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    Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
    Country: Belgium, Haiti, Iraq, Mali

    Belgium, a long-time supporter of FAO's work in emergencies, has deepened its commitment to protecting agriculture in countries struck by disaster with a €14-million contribution. This boosts FAO and its member countries' capacity to respond immediately to disasters and crises, and to strengthen the long-term resilience of vulnerable farmers and herders.

    The lion's share of the contribution is aimed at building farmers' ability to withstand shocks through multi-year programmes - an innovative approach to funding humanitarian responses. Commonly, humanitarian projects are funded in six-months or one-year cycles, leaving limited time to rehabilitate agriculture production and to improve risk-sensitive practices.

    These longer-term project cycles are particularly important for agriculture, as they allow support through multiple seasons and harvests. They were among the recommendations of the 2016 World Humanitarian Summit, which focused on reducing human suffering and delivering better aid for people facing crises around the world.

    "We strongly appreciate Belgium's efforts to "walk the talk" of the World Humanitarian Summit by providing flexible and multi-year humanitarian funding," said Dominique Burgeon, Director of FAO's Emergency and Rehabilitation Division and Strategic Programme Leader for Resilience. He added that, "Belgium's donation recognizes the critical role that farming plays in the lives of millions around the world."

    "Saving agriculture livelihoods helps people affected by a crisis in a sustainable way and allows them to stay on their land if they feel safe enough to do so," said Bruno van der Pluijm, Director-General for Development Cooperation and Humanitarian Aid.

    Among the crisis areas benefiting from the Belgium funding are the Sahel (€ 4 million), Mali (€ 2 million), Haiti (€ 3 million) and Iraq (€ 2 million). Another € 3 million went to FAO's Special Fund for Emergency Activities (SFERA). The latter allows FAO to release money quickly for rapid on-the-ground interventions - even before an emergency appeal is launched - when natural disasters or conflicts threaten the livelihoods, food security and nutrition of farming families.

    Belgium's support to SFERA is critical for rapid distributions of cereal and short-cycle quality vegetable seeds, which are often part of FAO's emergency interventions. These ensure that communities struck by crisis don't miss the upcoming planting season and are able to grow food fast and recover their livelihoods.

    Protecting valuable livestock with emergency feed and vaccinations is another important early action in many crises, so animals continue to provide protein, milk and income to pastoralist communities. In conflict zones, supporting backyard gardening, with poultry and small crops, and fishing activities are also essential lifelines for families forced to abandon their land or who have limited access to functioning markets. A new FAO publication, Partenariat humanitaire FAO-Belgique [in French], illustrates some of the most successful agriculture emergency interventions across the world.

    Its latest contributions places Belgium among FAO's top 10 humanitarian donors. FAO, together with the UN's Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) and the Norwegian Refugee Council, is undertaking a study on the effects of multi-year financing and will use Belgium as an example of best practice in international aid.


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    Source: UN Office of the SRSG for Children and Armed Conflict
    Country: Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mali, Myanmar, Nigeria, Philippines, South Sudan, Sudan, World

    New York – In her annual report to the Human Rights Council, the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict highlighted the progress accomplished since the creation of her mandate twenty years ago, but also urged Member States and parties to conflict to take immediate action to end persistent grave violations against children.

    “Despite notable advances achieved in the past two decades, the basic rights of children continue to be regularly violated,” said Leila Zerrougui. “For example, in Afghanistan, Iraq, Nigeria, Syria, South Sudan and Yemen, thousands of children are killed, maimed, recruited and used, and face acute humanitarian crises.”

    She added that the sheer number and variety of actors in today’s armed conflicts have contributed to an environment in which the protection of children is increasingly challenging and resource intensive. The grave impact on children of an increase in attacks on hospitals and healthcare professionals taking place in several countries on the children and armed conflict agenda was also highlighted in the report.

    Deprivation of liberty and screenings of children as an emerging aspect of counterterrorism strategies
    In light of the gravity of concerns related to children deprived of liberty in situations of armed conflict, the Special Representative raised this issue in her report again this year.

    “Children allegedly associated with non-State armed groups should be treated primarily as victims and I call on Member States to urgently adopt protocols for the handover of these children to protection actors,” Leila Zerrougui recommended. “Providing children with reintegration opportunities must be the prevailing approach.”

    With an increasing number of operations countering terrorism, the screening of civilians, including children, fleeing armed groups, has emerged as a new concern in 2016. This practice has led to the deprivation of liberty for children, in some cases due to the presumption of association with the armed groups they are fleeing. The Special Representative urged concerned bodies to focus on the detrimental impact that results from widespread screening exercises of civilians in situations of armed conflict.

    Impact of conflict on girls
    In a section of the report dedicated to the impact of conflict on girls, the Special Representative highlighted how, despite significant efforts to end impunity, they continue to be victims of rape and sexual violence. Recruitment and use is another issue requiring sustained attention, as some estimates state that as many as 40% of children associated with armed groups are girls.

    “Appropriate services should be available for the reintegration of girls associated with parties to conflict as well as supporting communities for the return of those who have been forcedly married, suffered sexual violence or borne children,” the Special Representative recommended.

    The vulnerabilities of girls are compounded by situations of displacement and Member States are encouraged to ensure that child-centered protection measures are implemented at all stages of displacement.

    Dialogue with parties to conflict
    In fulfilling her mandate, the Special Representative and the UN had interactions with parties to conflict in the Central African Republic, Colombia, Mali, Myanmar, Nigeria, the Philippines, South Sudan and Sudan. Three new Action Plans were signed, and, through the campaign “Children, Not Soldiers”, there was notable progress in the implementation of Action Plans in Afghanistan, the Democratic of the Congo, Myanmar and Sudan.

    “When there is political will and an openness to engage with the United Nations, Action Plans are one of the strongest tools available to generate tangible progress for boys and girls,” said Leila Zerrougui. “I’m confident that the increase in dialogue and progress in the implementation of Action Plans will continue, with direct benefits for children who need it the most.”

    For additional information, please contact:
    Stephanie Tremblay, Communications Officer, Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict, +1-212-963-8285 (office), +1-917-288-5791 (mobile), tremblay@un.org

    Read the annual report of the Special Representative to the Human Rights Council

    Download this press release as a pdf document

    Read this press release on our website: https://childrenandarmedconflict.un.org/press-release/annual-report-human-rights-council/


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria


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    Source: UN General Assembly
    Country: Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Iraq, Mali, Myanmar, Nigeria, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

    Note by the Secretariat

    The Secretariat has the honour to transmit to the Human Rights Council the report of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict, Leila Zerrougui. In the report, which covers the period from December 2015 to December 2016, the Special Representative outlines the activities undertaken in discharging her mandate and the progress achieved in addressing grave violations against children. The Special Representative also explores the challenges in strengthening the protection of children affected by armed conflict, including by addressing the impact of armed conflict on girls, the emerging and recurrent challenges related to the deprivation of liberty of children in situations of conflict, and progress in ending grave violations against children, in particular through direct engagement with parties to conflict. Lastly, the Special Representative sets out recommendations addressed to the Human Rights Council and Member States to further the protection of children’s rights.

    I. Introduction

    1. The present report covers the period from December 2015 to December 2016 and is submitted pursuant to General Assembly resolution 70/137, in which the Assembly requested the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict to submit a report to the Human Rights Council on the activities undertaken in fulfilment of her mandate, including information on her field visits and on the progress achieved and the challenges remaining on the children and armed conflict agenda.

    II. Progress and challenges in addressing grave violations against children in armed conflict

    1. The present report is submitted to the Human Rights Council 20 years after Graça Machel presented her findings on the impact of armed conflict on children (A/51/306) to the General Assembly, which through its resolution 51/77 subsequently created the mandate of the Special Representative. The Assembly also requested in its resolution that an annual report containing relevant information on the situation of children affected by armed conflict be transmitted to the then Commission on Human Rights. The anniversary thus provides an important opportunity to take stock of the longer-term achievements since the first report and to highlight to the Human Rights Council areas where progress is still required in order to enhance the protection of children and of their rights during armed conflict.

    2. Despite the advances that have been achieved in those two decades, the basic rights of children were regularly violated during the reporting period. In the Middle East, in addition to the direct impact of current conflicts on children, with thousands being killed, maimed, and recruited and used, there were rapidly developing and evolving humanitarian crises that were of serious concern at the time of writing, in December 2016. In Iraq, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) estimated that over half a million children and their families were trapped in Mosul with food and medicine running out and clean water in short supply. In a similar vein, in the Syrian Arab Republic, it was estimated that, at the end of the reporting period, nearly 500,000 children were living in besieged areas and were completely cut off from sustained humanitarian aid. In Yemen, intense conflict has resulted in a lack of food and water, which has put one and a half million children at risk of acute malnutrition.

    3. The Central African Republic was also a particular concern in 2016, and in the latter part of the reporting period the situation deteriorated significantly. Clashes between ex-Séléka factions in November in the east of the country resulted in many civilians, including children, being killed or wounded, and in over 11,000 persons reportedly being displaced. These clashes have added to the tension and violent outbreaks that have been ongoing throughout the reporting period. The prevailing insecurity led to the suspension of humanitarian activities in certain areas of the country, gravely compromising the right of children to health and well-being.

    4. With the resumption of fighting between the Sudan People’s Liberation Army and the Sudan People’s Liberation Army in Opposition in July 2016, children in South Sudan have also continued to bear the brunt of a devastating ongoing conflict. In the three years since the start of the hostilities, children have had their right to life, survival and development violated on a daily basis, and at the time of writing there was little end in sight to the conflict.

    5. Children’s rights to liberty and security of person were impacted by government security responses and many children were detained for their or their parents’ alleged association with armed groups. While advocacy has been successful and some children have been released, many more remained deprived of their liberty in situations of armed conflict. In the reporting period, the screening of civilians during military operations was also an emerging detention-related concern in a number of situations on the children and armed conflict agenda, which is elaborated upon in the present report.

    6. In Afghanistan, the Syrian Arab Republic and Yemen, the right of children to health has been severely compromised by attacks on hospitals and health-care professionals. A number of highly publicized attacks have taken place in 2016, which are indicative of trends that have seen increasing numbers of attacks and threats of attacks on health care in recent years. The right of girls to education has also continued to suffer, with attacks or threats of attacks on schools, teachers and female pupils in situations such as in Iraq, Nigeria and the Syrian Arab Republic, as well as in Afghanistan and Mali.

    7. Notwithstanding these pressing concerns and their impact on children, there has been progress in the last 12 months to protect the rights of children affected by armed conflict, which is described extensively in the report. This progress has included improvements in the normative framework, additional agreements with parties to conflict to protect children, and concrete action taken to separate and release children who were allegedly associated with parties to conflict.


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    Source: International Organization for Migration
    Country: Algeria, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Libya, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, World

    FLOWS OBSERVED THROUGH THE FLOW MONITORING POINTS

    The migrant movements in the north of Niger during the month of December are evolving in a context of tighter control of transporters who might facilitate passage of migrants into Libya. Trends of migrant flows thus continue to be lower than they were in the period from May to September with less than 15 000 migrants observed passing through the flow monitoring points during the reporting month.

    Since September 2016 the government of Niger has been operating a policy towards stronger repressive measures for smugglers transporting migrants from Agadez, through Arlit and Séguédine through arrests and confiscation of cars used to transport migrants. This has led to reports of it being much more difficult to leave Agadez and to pass through Arlit and Séguédine, not only towards Libya or Algeria but also from Libya and Algeria. There are reports of it being now more difficult to find available transporters given the riskier conditions that the smugglers are facing in light of increased controls. This has reportedly also led to a considerable raise in transportation fares for migrants wanting to travel from Agadez towards Algeria or Libya relying on transporters.

    Whilst there have always been lots of alternative routes through the desert that do not go through the main towns, with increased security controls in the towns of Séguédine and Arlit, it is clear from discussions with migrants that new and or alternatives routes are being used more. There are some reports of smugglers taking migrants on a route farther east of Séguédine, closer to the border with Chad to reach Libya. There are also preliminary reports of a road to reach Libya that goes from Mali, through Algeria and then to Libya to avoid going through Niger. These reports are being further investigated.

    With regards to the border with Algeria, only Nigeriens and Malians are still allowed to travel towards Tamanrasset, the other nationalities are not being allowed to pass through the police control points. In addition, the cases of migrants being repatriated from Algeria towards their countries of origin has in some measures deterred the migrants who initially wanted to migrate towards Algeria.

    The main nationalities passing through the flow monitoring points have been fairly constant over the entire monitoring period with the main nationalities overall entering Niger from the Libyan border being Nigeriens (81%), Nigerians (9%) and Malians (3%) while the main nationalities going towards Libya from Niger are Nigerians (22%), Nigeriens (19%), Gambians (15%), Senegalese (13%) and migrants from Côte d’Ivoire (7%). The main nationalities arriving in Arlit from Algeria have been Nigeriens (17%), Malians (13%) Guineans (11%), Cameroonians (11%) and Nigerians (8%). The main nationalities leaving Arlit to go towards Algeria are similar with Malians (17%), Nigeriens (14%) Guineans (23%), Cameroonians (11%) and Nigerians (10%).


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Senegal


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    Source: Voice of America
    Country: Nigeria

    ABUJA — The death toll from last week's bombing of civilian IDP camp in northeastern Nigeria has more than quadrupled from the originally reported 70 to 236 people. The Nigerian military says the bombing was an accident and is under investigation.

    A team of six senior officers of the Nigerian Air Force has arrived in the northeastern Borno state to begin investigating how a military jet could drop two bombs on a camp for displaced civilians.

    Nigerian Air Force spokesman Ayodele Famuyiwa told VOA the investigators will submit their findings no later than February 2. It is not clear whether the findings will be made public.

    Human Right Watch Nigeria senior researcher Mausi Segun says she had hoped for a broader panel of investigators that included civil society.

    “It should not be the Air Force alone, because indeed you cannot prosecute your own matter, should you? It goes against the principles of justice. And they’re not the only party involved,” Segun said.

    In a surprising move, Nigeria's Air Force quickly confirmed the bombing and called it a mistake. Nigeria’s military routinely resists accusations of alleged abuses against civilians.

    A Doctors Without Border (MSF) handout photo distributed Jan. 17, 2017, shows a wounded child after following the bombing by a Nigerian Air Force jet of a camp for those displaced by Boko Haram Islamists, in Rann, northeast Nigeria.

    The bombing occurred a week ago in Rann, a small rural town where at least 20,000 people have sought refuge from Boko Haram. Teams from Doctors Without Borders were providing humanitarian assistance there when the bombing occurred.

    ‘An emergency within an existing emergency’

    Doctors Without Borders Switzerland Director General Bruno Jochum told VOA the bombing exacerbated the situation on the ground.

    “This attack has created an emergency within an existing emergency, and I think people have to understand it is a daily cycle of violence for populations caught between a movement like Boko Haram and a military counteroffensive,” Jochum said.

    The seven year Boko Haram conflict has killed at least 20,000 people and displaced more than two million in the Lake Chad Basin.

    Nine workers from the Nigerian Red Cross and the International Committee of the Red Cross were among the victims. Segun suggests this could be why the Air Force was so prompt in responding to the incident.

    “If it were just ordinary local civilians, we might not have gotten an apology, a claim of responsibility, and a promise to investigate from the Nigerian government, if it ever came at all. Whether it was an accident or not, the right to life has been breached and the right of refugees to protection and safety has been breached,” Segun said.

    Satellite imagery indicates the IDP settlements were clearly visible from the air, raising further questions.

    Nigerian president Muhammadu Buhari called the bombing a “regrettable operational mistake.” But his claim that the conflict is in its “final stages” has been called into question. Among those critical of the claim is counterterrorism analyst Yan St. Pierre, who has been following Nigeria’s fight against Boko Haram for several years.

    “If the Air Force is still involved in so-called mopping up operations, which is in itself problematic, that says they still require a heavy hand. They still require a lot of backup to use the Air Force. That means this conflict is anything but over and the situation is actually worse than they presented,” St. Pierre said.

    Nigerian military officials declined to comment further until the investigation is finished.


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    Source: International Organization for Migration
    Country: Algeria, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Libya, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, World

    FLOWS OBSERVED THROUGH THE FLOW MONITORING POINTS

    The migrant movements in the north of Niger during the month of December are evolving in a context of tighter control of transporters who might facilitate passage of migrants into Libya. Trends of migrant flows thus continue to be lower than they were in the period from May to September with less than 15 000 migrants observed passing through the flow monitoring points during the reporting month.

    Since September 2016 the government of Niger has been operating a policy towards stronger repressive measures for smugglers transporting migrants from Agadez, through Arlit and Séguédine through arrests and confiscation of cars used to transport migrants. This has led to reports of it being much more difficult to leave Agadez and to pass through Arlit and Séguédine, not only towards Libya or Algeria but also from Libya and Algeria. There are reports of it being now more difficult to find available transporters given the riskier conditions that the smugglers are facing in light of increased controls. This has reportedly also led to a considerable raise in transportation fares for migrants wanting to travel from Agadez towards Algeria or Libya relying on transporters.

    Whilst there have always been lots of alternative routes through the desert that do not go through the main towns, with increased security controls in the towns of Séguédine and Arlit, it is clear from discussions with migrants that new and or alternatives routes are being used more. There are some reports of smugglers taking migrants on a route farther east of Séguédine, closer to the border with Chad to reach Libya. There are also preliminary reports of a road to reach Libya that goes from Mali, through Algeria and then to Libya to avoid going through Niger. These reports are being further investigated.

    With regards to the border with Algeria, only Nigeriens and Malians are still allowed to travel towards Tamanrasset, the other nationalities are not being allowed to pass through the police control points. In addition, the cases of migrants being repatriated from Algeria towards their countries of origin has in some measures deterred the migrants who initially wanted to migrate towards Algeria.

    The main nationalities passing through the flow monitoring points have been fairly constant over the entire monitoring period with the main nationalities overall entering Niger from the Libyan border being Nigeriens (81%), Nigerians (9%) and Malians (3%) while the main nationalities going towards Libya from Niger are Nigerians (22%), Nigeriens (19%), Gambians (15%), Senegalese (13%) and migrants from Côte d’Ivoire (7%). The main nationalities arriving in Arlit from Algeria have been Nigeriens (17%), Malians (13%) Guineans (11%), Cameroonians (11%) and Nigerians (8%). The main nationalities leaving Arlit to go towards Algeria are similar with Malians (17%), Nigeriens (14%) Guineans (23%), Cameroonians (11%) and Nigerians (10%).


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    Source: Government of Finland
    Country: Afghanistan, Chad, Finland, Iraq, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World

    Press Release 17/2017

    25 January 2017

    Following a decision by Minister for Foreign Trade and Development Kai Mykkänen, Finland granted an additional EUR 14 million for humanitarian crisis areas across the world in late December 2016. Emergency relief will be directed at the southern African region that suffers from El Niño-induced drought, Yemen, South Sudan, Kenya, Chad, Iraq, Northern Nigeria, and Afghanistan’s refugee situation. This aid will be channelled through the UN World Food Programme (WFP), the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and the UN Children's Fund (UNICEF).

    Minister Mykkänen has expressed his worries about current developments:

    “I regret that the humanitarian situation in the world did not take a turn for the better in 2016. We remained powerless in face of the devastating civil war in Syria and the tragedy of Aleppo, prime examples of today’s prolonged man-made humanitarian crises. At the same time, I feel proud because Finland is among the countries that support humanitarian assistance even in the hardest circumstances. In 2016, we were also actively involved in the efforts to develop humanitarian aid by striving, for example, to improve the conditions for the disabled and enhance the private sector’s role.”

    With this funding decision, Finland’s humanitarian aid totalled EUR 92 million in 2016. As for last year’s individual humanitarian crises, the largest amount of aid, a total of EUR 15 million, was allocated to Syria and its neighbouring areas. Finland’s humanitarian aid to Yemen rose to EUR 4.5 million, while Syria was granted a total of EUR 7.4 million. Over 80 per cent of Yemenites are in need of humanitarian aid, and their total needs will reach EUR 1.9 billion in 2017.

    In Iraq, the annual humanitarian needs have increased to over EUR 1 billion due to such developments as the military action in connection with the recapture of Mosul. An estimated 1.2 to 1.5 million civilians will need shelter and emergency relief following this operation. In 2016, Finland’s humanitarian aid for Iraq reached a total of EUR 5.3 million.

    The food security situation in southern Africa has deteriorated significantly as a result of severe drought caused by the El Niño weather event with ensuing yield losses. The number of people without food security in this area is 41.4 million, and 23 million of them will need emergency relief. In 2016 Finnish aid for the southern African region amounted to EUR 4.5 million.

    The humanitarian situation in Afghanistan remains very challenging. It was estimated that over one million Afghan refugees were on the move internally and across borders on their way back to Afghanistan in late 2016. Such a high level of mobility, combined with winter conditions, gives rise to a serious humanitarian crisis due to the extremely poor absorption capacity of local communities and the inadequate resources of aid organisations for addressing the situation. In 2016, Finland granted EUR 4 million to alleviate the refugee situation in Afghanistan.

    Kenya is the second most important host country for refugees in Africa, providing refuge to over 600,000 people. The majority of them originate from Somalia, and their voluntary return to their home country is supported by the UNHCR. New refugees keep fleeing to Kenya from South Sudan. Finland has granted EUR 1.5 million to help Kenya cope with its current situation.

    As for West Africa, the Sahel region faces a difficult situation: security problems, lack of food security, population growth and climate change have increased the need for humanitarian aid. At the same time, assistance operations suffer from a serious shortage of funding in this forgotten crisis. Due to the region’s demographic structure, children form a significant part of those in need. In late 2016, Finland granted aid to Chad and North-Eastern Nigeria through UNHCR and Unicef.

    Inquiries: Claus Jerker Lindroos, Director, Unit for Humanitarian Assistance and Policy, tel. +358 295 351 234.

    The Foreign Ministry's email addresses follow the format firstname.lastname@formin.fi.


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    Source: UN Security Council
    Country: Mali

    SC/12692-AFR/3525-PKO/622

    The following Security Council press statement was issued today by Council President Olof Skoog (Sweden):

    The members of the Security Council condemned in the strongest terms the attack against the camp of the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) in Aguelhoc, in the north of Mali, on 23 January 2017, which caused the death of a Chadian peacekeeper and injured others.

    The members of the Security Council expressed their deepest condolences and sympathy to the family of the victim, as well as to the Government of Chad and to MINUSMA. They paid tribute to the peacekeepers who risk their lives.

    The members of the Security Council called on the Government of Mali to swiftly investigate these attacks and bring the perpetrators to justice. They underlined that attacks targeting peacekeepers may constitute war crimes under international law.

    The members of the Security Council reaffirmed that terrorism in all its forms and manifestations constitutes one of the most serious threats to international peace and security. The members of the Security Council underlined the need to bring perpetrators, organizers, financiers and sponsors of these reprehensible acts of terrorism to justice. They stressed that those responsible for these killings should be held accountable, and urged all States, in accordance with their obligations under international law and relevant Security Council resolutions, to cooperate actively with all relevant authorities in this regard.

    The members of the Security Council reiterated that any acts of terrorism are criminal and unjustifiable, regardless of their motivation, wherever, whenever and by whomsoever committed. They reaffirmed the need for all States to combat by all means, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations and other obligations under international law, including international human rights law, international refugee law and international humanitarian law, threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts.

    The members of the Security Council reiterated their full support for MINUSMA and the French forces that support it. They reiterated their strong support for the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Mali, Mahamat Saleh Annadif, and for MINUSMA to assist the Malian authorities and the Malian people in their efforts to bring lasting peace and stability to their country, including through MINUSMA’s support to the implementation of the Agreement for Peace and Reconciliation in Mali.

    The members of the Security Council expressed their concern about the security situation in Mali, including the violations of the ceasefire arrangements. They urged the Malian parties to fully implement the Agreement without further delay. They noted that the full implementation of the Agreement and the intensification of efforts to overcome asymmetric threats can contribute to improving the security situation across Mali.

    The members of the Security Council further stressed the importance that MINUSMA has the necessary capacities to fulfil its mandate and promote the safety and security of the United Nations peacekeepers, pursuant to Security Council resolution 2295 (2016).

    For information media. Not an official record.


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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Iraq, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

    Emergency food assistance needs unprecedented as Famine threatens four countries

    The combined magnitude, severity, and geographic scope of anticipated emergency food assistance needs during 2017 is unprecedented in recent decades. Given persistent conflict, severe drought, and economic instability, FEWS NET estimates that 70 million people, across 45 countries, will require emergency food assistance this year. Four countries – Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, and Yemen – face a credible risk of Famine (IPC Phase 5). In order to save lives, continued efforts to resolve conflict and improve humanitarian access are essential. In addition, given the scale of anticipated need, donors and implementing partners should allocate available financial and human resources to those areas where the most severe food insecurity is likely.

    Food insecurity during 2017 will be driven primarily by three factors. Most importantly, persistent conflict is disrupting livelihoods, limiting trade, and restricting humanitarian access across many regions, including the Lake Chad Basin, the Central African Republic, Sudan, South Sudan, the Great Lakes Region, Somalia, Yemen, Ukraine, Syria, Iraq, and Afghanistan. A second important driver is drought, especially those driven by the 2015/16 El Niño and the 2016/17 La Niña. In Southern Africa and the Horn of Africa, significantly below-average rainfall has sharply reduced crop harvests and severely limited the availability of water and pasture for livestock. In Central Asia, snowfall to date has also been below average, potentially limiting the water available for irrigated agriculture during 2017. Finally, economic instability, related to conflict, a decline in foreign reserves due to low global commodity prices, and associated currency depreciation have contributed to very high staple food prices in Nigeria, Malawi, Mozambique, South Sudan, and Yemen.

    As a result of these principal drivers, FEWS NET estimates that 70 million people across 45 countries, will face Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or worse acute food insecurity and will require emergency food assistance during 2017 (Figure 2). This marks the second consecutive year of extremely large needs, with the size of the acutely food insecure population roughly 40 percent higher than in 2015 (Figure 1). The countries likely to have the largest acutely food insecure populations during 2017 are Yemen, Syria, South Sudan, and Malawi. Together, these four countries account for roughly one-third of the total population in need of emergency food assistance.

    In addition to the sheer size of the food insecure population, a persistent lack of access to adequate food and income over the past three years has left households in the worst-affected countries with little ability to manage future shocks. Given this reduced capacity to cope and the possibility that additional shocks will occur, four countries face a credible risk of Famine (IPC Phase 5) during 2017. In Nigeria, evidence suggests that Famine occurred in 2016 and could be ongoing. In both Yemen and South Sudan the combination of persistent conflict, economic instability, and restricted humanitarian access makes Famine possible over the coming year. Finally in Somalia, a failure of the October to December 2016 Deyr rains and a forecast of poor spring rains threaten a repeat of 2011 when Famine led to the deaths of 260,000 Somalis. Emergency (IPC Phase 4), characterized by large food gaps, significant increases in the prevalence of acute malnutrition, and excess mortality among children, is also anticipated in southern areas of Malawi, Zimbabwe, Sudan, and Madagascar if adequate assistance is not provided.


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Central African Republic, Chad, Nigeria, Sudan

    HIGHLIGHTS

    • School year 2016/2017 resumed in Chad

    • High Commissioner, Fillipo Grande, visit to Chad

    • Ongoing Nutritional Survey to assess the malnutrition and anemia condition of refugee children


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria

    SITUATION ANALYSIS

    On an unprecedented scale, almost half of the Diffa region’s population was forcibly displaced in 2016. As of September, the Government of Niger estimated that 302,000 persons including refugees (30%), IDPs (60%) and returning Niger nationals (10%), were displaced. Due to insecurity, the number of settlement areas open to the displaced was reduced from approximately 150 to 80, as people moved to sites in safer and more accessible locations, mainly located along the Route Nationale 1. Although, the population of concern is now more easily accessible to the humanitarian community, continued access challenges remain in the Bosso and N’Guigmi areas. The majority of refugees and IDPs, who were previously hosted by local families now have to settle on the outskirts of towns and villages or in isolated sites, resulting in the creation of rural ghettos. This exerts additional pressure on already scarce natural resources, infrastructure and limited basic services. As a result, inter-communal and inter-ethnic tensions have increased and the causes of this worrying development are being investigated. The displaced’s tendency to move to either Sayam Forage refugee camp or Kabelawa IDP camp grew during 2016 as more and more people sought security and access to basic assistance. Still, both camps combined host less than 20,000 people, representing less than 10 per cent of the total displaced population.

    The key priority in the Diffa response is to enhance social cohesion and peaceful coexistence through the various cluster responses and to strengthen institutional, community and individual resilience throughout the region.

    RRRP partners (28) and authorities at national, regional, and local levels are working closely together to respond to the needs of the affected population. At Diffa level, the overall coordination of the crisis falls under the responsibility of the Governor of Diffa, through the Regional Committee for the Management of the Displaced. The Sectoral Technical Working Groups coordinate the response with the support of the national clusters based in Niamey. Concerning coordination and planning for 2017, UNHCR and OCHA have worked closely to develop the 2017 Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) and the RRRP.


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    Source: UN Security Council
    Country: Mali

    SC/12692-AFR/3525-PKO/622

    On trouvera ci-après le texte de la déclaration à la presse faite, aujourd’hui, par le Président du Conseil de sécurité pour le mois de janvier, M. Olof Skoog (Suède):

    Les membres du Conseil de sécurité ont condamné dans les termes les plus énergiques l’attaque qui a visé le camp de la Mission multidimensionnelle intégrée des Nations Unies pour la stabilisation au Mali (MINUSMA) à Aguelhoc, dans le nord du Mali, le 23 janvier 2017, et qui a causé la mort d’un soldat de la paix tchadien et fait plusieurs blessés.

    Les membres du Conseil ont exprimé leur profonde sympathie et leurs sincères condoléances à la famille de la victime, ainsi qu’au Gouvernement tchadien et à la MINUSMA. Ils ont rendu hommage aux soldats de la paix qui risquent leur vie.

    Les membres du Conseil ont demandé au Gouvernement malien d’ouvrir rapidement une enquête sur cette attaque et d’en traduire les auteurs en justice. Ils ont souligné que les attaques visant des soldats de la paix peuvent constituer des crimes de guerre au regard du droit international.

    Les membres du Conseil ont réaffirmé que le terrorisme sous toutes ses formes et dans toutes ses manifestations constituait l’une des menaces les plus graves contre la paix et la sécurité internationales. Ils ont souligné la nécessité de traduire en justice les auteurs et les organisateurs de ces actes de terrorisme odieux, ainsi que ceux qui financent et commanditent ces actes. Ils ont fait valoir que les responsables de ces tueries devaient être amenés à répondre de leurs actes et exhorté tous les États à coopérer activement avec toutes les autorités compétentes à cet égard, conformément aux obligations que leur imposent le droit international et les résolutions pertinentes du Conseil de sécurité.

    Les membres du Conseil ont réaffirmé que tous les actes de terrorisme étaient des crimes injustifiables, quels qu’en soient les motivations et les auteurs et indépendamment de l’endroit et du moment où ils étaient perpétrés. Ils ont réaffirmé que tous les États devaient combattre par tous les moyens, conformément à la Charte des Nations Unies et aux autres obligations que leur impose le droit international, notamment le droit international des droits de l’homme, le droit international des réfugiés et le droit international humanitaire, les menaces à la paix et à la sécurité internationales que constituent les actes terroristes.

    Les membres du Conseil ont réaffirmé qu’ils soutenaient sans réserve la MINUSMA et les forces françaises qui l’appuient. Ils ont de nouveau assuré de leur ferme soutien le Représentant spécial du Secrétaire général pour le Mali, Mahamat Saleh Annadif, et la MINUSMA dans les efforts qu’ils font pour aider les autorités et le peuple maliens à parvenir à une paix durable et à la stabilité dans leur pays, notamment dans le cadre de l’appui fourni par la Mission à la mise en œuvre de l’Accord pour la paix et la réconciliation au Mali.

    Les membres du Conseil se sont déclarés préoccupés par la situation en matière de sécurité au Mali, et notamment par les violations des accords de cessez-le-feu. Ils ont exhorté les parties maliennes à mettre en œuvre l’Accord dans son intégralité et sans plus tarder. Ils ont noté que la mise en œuvre intégrale de l’Accord et l’intensification des efforts visant à lutter contre les menaces asymétriques pouvaient contribuer à améliorer les conditions de sécurité dans tout le pays.

    Les membres du Conseil ont en outre souligné qu’il importait que la MINUSMA dispose des capacités nécessaires pour s’acquitter de son mandat et promouvoir la sûreté et la sécurité des soldats de la paix des Nations Unies, conformément à la résolution 2295 (2016) du Conseil de sécurité.


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria

    SITUATION ANALYSIS

    In 2016, the fight against Boko Haram insurgents intensified with the continued deployment of the Multi-National Joint Task Force (MNJTF). To support these efforts, local authorities in Chad’s Lake region, provided strong leadership in community mobilisation efforts to prevent Boko Haram from infiltrating communities. In response, the insurgent group changed its modus operandi, switching from attacking villages and civilians, to attacking military positions and planting mines instead. The state of emergency in the region declared in November 2015 is still in force. As a result of counter-insurgency operations, the number of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) and returned Chadian nationals increased.

    Heavy military presence in the area jeopardized the civilian and humanitarian character of IDP sites and Dar Es Salam refugee camp, increasing the number of incidents related to sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV). Lastly, humanitarian space and access were further reduced. Since May 2016, armed escorts have been necessary to provide humanitarian assistance to refugees in Ngouboua and Tchoukoutalia. Those refugees hosted in more remote areas continued to receive minimal assistance through close collaboration with the authorities and volunteers from the Chadian Red Cross.

    In 2017, RRRP partners will continue to provide protection and assistance to 8,000 Nigerian refugees and 14,550 host community members, to support affected communities in a region already characterized by harsh climatic conditions, poor infrastructure, poor service delivery and frequent epidemic outbreaks.

    UNHCR will continue to collaborate with the Government through the Commission Nationale pour l’Accueil et la Réinsertion des Réfugiés et des Rapatriés (CNARR) to coordinate the refugee response in close cooperation with local authorities. RRRP partners include six UN agencies as well as their implementing partners.

    In N’Djamena and Baga Sola, UNHCR will continue to lead coordination meetings related to the refugee response in close collaboration with partners and local authorities.


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria

    SITUATION ANALYSIS

    In 2016, the Far North region of Cameroon continued to endure violent cross-border attacks perpetrated by Boko Haram. The conflict in north-eastern Nigeria forced over 85,000 Nigerians from Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states to seek safety in Cameroon, and caused the internal displacement of 198,889 Cameroonians in the Far North region. At the beginning of 2016, the majority of new arrivals into Cameroon’s Minawao refugee camp came from border areas, where they had previously sought asylum and safety, but owing to Boko Haram incursions and military retaliations, the latter were forced to move further inland, in search of protection, security and assistance. Since June, the majority of new arrivals have come directly from Nigeria. As of end-October, UNHCR had registered 58,933 refugees in Minawao camp including new arrivals and newborns. The camp continues to operate beyond maximum capacity and the congestion makes providing assistance at international humanitarian standards a key challenge. In addition, 25,756 unregistered refugees live in villages along the border with Nigeria, mainly in the departments of Logone-et-Chari (12,770) and Mayo-Tsanaga (12,986).

    The needs of Nigerian refugees in Cameroon and host communities remain significant. The strong presence of security forces and fears of potential infiltrations in border areas require renewed engagement in order to maintain and ensure the civilian and humanitarian character of asylum. Furthermore, humanitarian needs persist in all sectors. These include strengthening the prevention of and response to malnutrition and increasing surveillance as well as improving access to primary health care and to education on a non-discriminatory basis and providing water in a sustainable manner. Furthermore, sanitary infrastructures in Minawao camp need to be improved and a greater focus needs to be placed on the use of participatory approaches.

    The coordination of the overall humanitarian response for all impacted populations in the Far North has been delegated to UNHCR’s Head of Sub-Office in Maroua, who, together with 17 partners implements projects for Nigerian refugees in Minawao camp and surrounding host communities, which are the main populations targeted.


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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Chad, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Yemen

    This brief summarizes FEWS NET’s most forward-looking analysis of projected emergency food assistance needs in FEWS NET coverage countries. The projected size of each country’s acutely food insecure population (IPC Phase 3 and higher) is compared to last year and the recent five-year average and categorized as Higher, Similar, or Lower. Countries where external emergency food assistance needs are anticipated are identified. Projected lean season months highlighted in red indicate either an early start or an extension to the typical lean season. Additional information is provided for countries with large food insecure populations, an expectation of high severity, or where other key issues warrant additional discussion. Analytical confidence is lower in remote monitoring countries, denoted by “RM”. Visit www.fews.net for detailed country reports.


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Nigeria

    Highlights

    • As of 25 January, International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) medical teams had performed surgeries on 78 people injured during the military airstrike on Rann on 17 January. In Rann itself, 107 people were treated.

    • Those who underwent operations had broken limbs, suffered burns or shrapnel wounds.

    • A total of 98 people were airlifted for treatment in Maiduguri, the capital of Borno state. The majority of them were children, some of whom were not accompanied by their families. Nigeria Red Cross volunteers are looking after the unaccompanied minors.

    • The humanitarian community continues to express shock over the airstrike and show solidarity with the victims and their families. The Nigerian military has said it is investigating the circumstance that led to the incident.

    Situation overview

    Surgical teams have been working hard to treat the dozens of injured civilians. Over three days, 98 people were evacuated to hospitals in Maiduguri, where two boys in serious condition unfortunately succumbed to their injuries. Nine Nigerian Red Cross Society volunteers remain in critical state. Six of their colleagues died in the bombardment that occurred as they were starting food distribution to displaced people in Rann. The food distribution to 25,000 people was completed on 23 January with the help of local volunteers.

    UN Humanitarian Air Service and military helicopters were instrumental in the emergency medical evacuation that saw the UN air service airlift 967 kg of medical cargo to Rann and ferry medical teams to the ground.

    Aid agencies have called for better protection of civilians and respect of humanitarian space in the ongoing conflict that has brought deep devastation to millions of people across north-eastern Nigeria. An inter-agency assessment in Rann on 9 January found that around 35,000 people were displaced in the locality, with the majority living in makeshift shelters and lacking sufficient food, water, health and sanitation services.

    The long-running conflict has left some 8.5 million people in need of assistance in Adamawa, Borno and Yobe.

    This year, humanitarian organizations plan to assist 6.9 million people in dire need of nutrition, food, shelter, health, education, protection and water and sanitation. A projected 5.1 million people will face serious food shortages as the conflict and threat of unexploded devices have hampered farming for a third year in a row.


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    Source: World Food Programme
    Country: Nigeria

    Responding to Nigeria Emergency

    Partners have sent medicines, medical kits, tarpaulins, water tanks, generators, prefabricated warehouses, and vehicles to Abuja, Lagos, and Maiduguri.

    For information about stocks available through UNHRD’s Loan and Borrow facility, please visit www.unhrd.org or contact unhrd.customerservice@wfp.org.


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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Burkina Faso

    Key Messages

    La situation alimentaire des ménages pauvres reste normale et est favorisée par la stabilité, voire la baisse légère des prix des denrées de base comparativement à la moyenne quinquennale. La majorité de ces ménages ont encore recours à leur propre production pour la consommation. Ce qui leur permet d’être en insécurité alimentaire Minimale (Phase 1 de l’IPC).

    Dans les zones à dominance pastorale, la dégradation de la situation sécuritaire et la réduction de la demande des principaux pays importateurs perturbent le fonctionnement normal des marchés. Sur les marchés à bétail, il y a une baisse de la fréquentation des acheteurs étrangers et une persistance de la baisse des prix des animaux de l’ordre de 10 à 20 pourcent par rapport à la moyenne quinquennale – une situation particulièrement défavorable aux éleveurs qui font face à des termes de l’échange bétail/céréales en-dessous de la normale.

    Les activités de maraichage se déroulent normalement. Il en est de même pour la pratique de l’orpaillage. Depuis les récoltes, ces deux activités constituent comme en année normale, la principale occupation des ménages. Les prix de vente des produits maraichers et de l’or étant similaires à leurs niveaux moyens des cinq dernières années, les revenus générés sont aussi typiques.


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