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ReliefWeb - Updates

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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Chad


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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Mali

    The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) monitors trends in staple food prices in countries vulnerable to food insecurity. For each FEWS NET country and region, the Price Bulletin provides a set of charts showing monthly prices in the current marketing year in selected urban centers and allowing users to compare current trends with both five-year average prices, indicative of seasonal trends, and prices in the previous year.

    Millet, rice, and sorghum constitute the basic staple foods for the majority of the Malian population. Millet has traditionally been the most widely consumed, but since 2005 rice has become a popular substitute in urban households. Sorghum is generally more important for rural than urban households. Markets included are indicative of local conditions within their respective regions. Ségou is one of the most important markets for both the country and region because it is located in a very large grain production area. Bamako, the capital and largest urban center in the country, functions as an assembly market. It receives cereals from Koulikoro, Ségou, and Sikasso for consumption and also acts as an assembly market for trade with the northern regions of the country (Kayes and Koulikoro) and Mauritania. Markets in the deficit areas of the country (Timbuktu and Gao) receive their supplies of millet and rice from Mopti, Ségou and Sikasso.


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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Mauritania

    The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) monitors trends in staple food prices in countries vulnerable to food insecurity. For each FEWS NET country and region, the Price Bulletin provides a set of charts showing monthly prices in the current marketing year in selected urban centers and allowing users to compare current trends with both five-year average prices, indicative of seasonal trends, and prices in the previous year.

    Local rice and sorghum are the most consumed food products by poor households in Mauritania followed by imported wheat which is a substitute that these households turn to the most. Local rice is grown in the river valley (in the southern regions of Trarza, Brakna, Gorgol and Guidimakha). Sorghum is produced in all areas of production (rainfed) and in flood-recession areas. However, a significant portion is imported from Mali and Senegal. Mauritania depends greatly on food imports (70% in a good agricultural year and 85% in a bad year) than on internal production. Nouakchott is the principal collection market for imported products and also the distribution market where traders acquire supplies for the secondary markets referenced below.

    Cooking oil is consumed mainly in urban areas. The sale of animals is a lifestyle in all areas and an important source of income and food.


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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Niger

    The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) monitors trends in staple food prices in countries vulnerable to food insecurity. For each FEWS NET country and region, the Price Bulletin provides a set of charts showing monthly prices in the current marketing year in selected urban centers and allowing users to compare current trends with both five-year average prices, indicative of seasonal trends, and prices in the previous year.

    Millet, maize, cowpea, and imported rice are the most important food commodities. Millet is consumed by both rural and poor urban households throughout the country. Maize and imported rice are most important for urban households, while cowpea is mainly consumed by poor households in rural and urban areas as a protein source. Niamey is the most important national market and an international trade center, and also supplies urban households. Tillaberi is also an urban center that supplies the surrounding area. Gaya market represents a main urban market for maize with cross-border connections. Maradi, Tounfafi, and Diffa are regional assembly and cross-border markets for Niger and other countries in the region. These are markets where households and herders coming from the northern cereal deficit areas regularly buy their food. Agadez and Zinder are also important national and regional markets. Nguigmi and Abalak are located in pastoral areas, where people are heavily dependent on cereal markets for their food supply. They are particularly important during the rainy season, when herders are confined to the pastoral zone.


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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Nigeria

    The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) monitors trends in staple food prices in countries vulnerable to food insecurity. For each FEWS NET country and region, the Price Bulletin provides a set of charts showing monthly prices in the current marketing year in selected urban centers and allowing users to compare current trends with both five-year average prices, indicative of seasonal trends, and prices in the previous year.

    Sorghum, maize, millet, cowpea, gari (fermented cassava starch), and rice are all found in Nigerian markets. Sorghum, millet and maize are widely consumed by most households, but especially in the north, and are used by various industries. Maize is mainly used by the poultry industry as a raw material for feed while sorghum is used by breweries for producing beverages. Sorghum and millet are important for households in the north, particularly the border markets where millet is also heavily traded with Niger. Gari is widely consumed by households in the south and some in the north. Rice is produced and consumed throughout the country. The north is a major production and consumption area for cowpea which flows to the south for use by households and food processing industries. Ilela, Maiadua, and Damasak are all critical cross-border markets with Niger. Saminaka, Giwa, Dandume, and Kaura Namoda are important grain markets in the north, which are interconnected with the Dawanu market in Kano, the largest wholesale market in West Africa, and some southern markets such as the Bodija market in Ibadan. Millet, sorghum, maize, and cowpea are among the most important cereals traded at Kano, while cassava and some cereals are traded with Ibadan.


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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Senegal

    Rice, millet, sorghum, and maize are the primary staple foods in Senegal.

    Groundnuts are both an important source of protein and a commonly grown cash crop. Imported rice is consumed daily by the vast majority of households in Senegal particularly in Dakar and Touba urban centers. Local rice is produced and consumed in the Senegal River Valley. St. Louis is a major market for the Senegal River Valley. Millet is consumed in central regions where Kaolack is the most important regional market. Maize is produced and consumed in areas around Kaolack, Tambacounda, and the Senegal River Valley. Some maize is also imported mainly from the international market. High demand for all commodities exists in and around Touba and Dakar. They are also important centers for stocking and storage during the lean season. The harvests of grains and groundnuts begin at the end of the marketing year in October; and stocks of locally produced grains are drawn down throughout the marketing year. Senegal depends more on imports from the international market for rice than from cross border trade which mainly includes cattle from Mali and Mauritania that supply Dakar and surrounding markets.


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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cabo Verde, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Togo

    West Africa can be divided into three agro-ecological zones or three different trade basins (West Basin, Central Basin and East Basin). Both important for understanding market behavior and dynamics.

    The three major agro-ecological zones are the Sahelian, the Sudanese and the Coastal zones where production and consumption can be easily classified. (1) In the Sahelian zone, millet is the principal cereal cultivated and consumed particularly in rural areas and increasingly, when accessible, in urban areas. Exceptions include Cape Verde where maize and rice are most important, Mauritania where sorghum and maize are staples, and Senegal with rice. The principal substitutes in the Sahel are sorghum, rice, and cassava flour (Gari), the latter two in times of shortage. (2) In the Sudanese zone (southern Chad, central Nigeria, Benin, Ghana, Togo, Côte d'Ivoire, southern Burkina Faso, Mali, Senegal, Guinea Bissau, Serra Leone, Liberia) maize and sorghum constitute the principal cereals consumed by the majority of the population. They are followed by rice and tubers, particularly cassava and yam. (3) In the Coastal zone, with two rainy seasons, yam and maize constitute the most important food products. They are supplemented by cowpea, which is a significant source of protein.

    The three trade basins are known as the West, Central, and East basins. In addition to the north to south movement of particular commodities, certain cereals flow horizontally. (1) The West basin refers to Mauritania, Senegal, western Mali, Sierra Leone, Guinea, Liberia, and The Gambia where rice is most heavily traded. (2) The Central basin consists of Côte d'Ivoire, central and eastern Mali, Burkina Faso, Ghana, and Togo where maize is commonly traded. (3) The East basin refers to Niger, Nigeria, Chad, and Benin where millet is traded most frequently. These three trade basins are shown on the map above.


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    Source: World Food Programme
    Country: Nigeria

    Key messages for decision makers

    • 87 percent of respondents have acceptable food consumption while the others have borderline (12%) or poor (1%) food consumption.

    • Some 23% of the households have one meal per day while others have two meals (38%) or three meals (39%).

    • During the seven days preceding the assessment, all households have used coping strategies to get food, and the mean reduced Coping Strategy Index (rCSI) remains high (21).

    • A total of 1,805 children were screened using MUAC, out of whom less than 2% were found to be malnourished.

    • Markets are functional and main staple foods are available, but at higher prices.

    • Security situation being the main driver of market functionality, cash based interventions could be gradually implemented once the security situation improve.

    Introduction

    According to IOM, the number of IDPs returning to their place of usual residence, before the insurgency began, is increasing. As of 15th December 2016, about 6,500 IDPs returning back to their place of origin were registered in Magumeri Local Government Area (LGA).

    A rapid food security assessment was conducted in Magumeri as part of the Rapid Response Mechanism (RRM) from 20th to 22nd December 2016.

    The RRM is a joint mission between WFP and UNICEF which is designed to respond to rapidly changing needs in hard-to-reach and/or newly accessible areas.

    Key activities conducted during RRM included registration and food distribution to vulnerable households along with the provision of nutrition supplements for the prevention of acute malnutrition and mortality. In addition to distribution, nutrition screening is carried out to identify children at risk.

    The objective of the rapid food security assessment was to evaluate the current food security and nutrition situation of beneficiaries.


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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Senegal

    Le Réseau de systèmes d’alerte précoce contre la famine (FEWS NET) surveille les tendances des prix des aliments de base dans les pays vulnérables à l'insécurité alimentaire. Pour chaque pays et chaque région couvert par FEWS NET, le Bulletin des prix fournit un ensemble de graphiques indiquant les prix mensuels de l’année commerciale en cours pour certains centres urbains, et permettant à l’utilisateur de comparer les tendances actuelles à la fois aux moyennes quinquennales, qui indiquent les tendances saisonnières, et aux prix de l'année précédente.

    Au Sénégal, le riz, le mil, le sorgho et le maïs constituent la base de l’alimentation des ménages. L’arachide représente aussi bien une source importante de protéine et communément une culture de rente. Le riz importé est consommé quotidiennement par la grande majorité des ménages, particulièrement dans les centres urbains de Dakar et Touba. Le riz produit localement dans la vallée du fleuve Sénégal y est consommé. St. Louis est le principal marché dans la vallée du fleuve Sénégal. Le mil est consommé dans les régions centrales où Kaolack représente le marché régional le plus important. Le maïs est produit et consommé dans les zones autour de Kaolack, Tambacounda et dans la vallée du fleuve Sénégal. Du maïs est aussi importé, principalement du marché international. Il existe une forte demande pour tous les produits à Touba et à Dakar. La récolte des céréales et celle de l’arachide débutent en Octobre et les stocks de céréales locales baissent de niveau tout au long de l’année de commercialisation qui s’achève en Octobre. Le Sénégal dépend plus des importations à partir du marché international, surtout le riz, que du commerce transfrontalier qui concerne essentiellement le bétail provenant du Mali et de la Mauritanie pour approvisionner Dakar et les marchés environnants.


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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Niger

    Le Réseau de Systèmes d’Alerte Précoce Contre la Famine surveille les tendances des prix des aliments de base dans les pays vulnérables à l'insécurité alimentaire. Pour chaque FEWS NET pays et la région, le Bulletin des prix fournit un ensemble de tableaux indiquant les prix mensuels à la campagne en cours dans certains centres urbains et en permettant aux utilisateurs de comparer les tendances actuelles à la fois les prix de cinq ans en moyenne, une indication des tendances saisonnières, et les prix l'année précédente.

    Le mil, le maïs, le niébé et le riz importé sont les produits alimentaires les plus importants consommés au Niger. Le mil est consommé aussi bien par les ménages ruraux que les ménages pauvres urbains dans l’ensemble du pays. Le maïs et le riz importé sont plus importants pour les ménages urbains, tandis que le niébé est principalement consommé par les ménages pauvres des régions rurales et urbaines en tant que source de protéine. Niamey est le marché national le plus important et un centre du commerce international ; elle approvisionne en outre les ménages urbains. Tillaberi est aussi un centre urbain approvisionnant les localités environnantes. Le marché de Gaya est le principal marché urbain pour le maïs avec des liens transfrontaliers. Maradi, Tounfafi et Diffa sont des marchés de regroupement régionaux et des marchés transfrontaliers pour le Niger et d’autres pays de la région. C'est dans ces marchés que vont régulièrement acheter leur nourriture les ménages et les éleveurs des régions déficitaires en céréales du nord. Agadez et Zinder sont également d’importants marchés nationaux et régionaux. Nguigmi et Abalak se trouvent dans des zones pastorales, où la population dépend largement des marchés céréaliers pour leur approvisionnement alimentaire. Ces deux marchés sont particulièrement importants pendant la saison des pluies, lorsque les éleveurs sont confinés dans la zone pastorale.


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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Mauritania

    Le Réseau de Systèmes d’Alerte Précoce Contre la Famine surveille les tendances des prix des aliments de base dans les pays vulnérables à l'insécurité alimentaire. Pour chaque FEWS NET pays et la région, le Bulletin des prix fournit un ensemble de tableaux indiquant les prix mensuels à la campagne en cours dans certains centres urbains et en permettant aux utilisateurs de comparer les tendances actuelles à la fois les prix de cinq ans en moyenne, une indication des tendances saisonnières, et les prix l'année précédente.

    Le riz local et le sorgho sont les produits alimentaires les plus consommés par les ménages pauvres de la Mauritanie suivis par le blé importé qui est l'aliment de substitution auquel ces ménages recourent le plus. Le riz local est cultivé dans la vallée du fleuve (dans le sud des régions du Trarza, du Brakna, du Gorgol et du Guidimakha). Le sorgho est produit dans toutes les zones de production (sorgho pluvial) et dans les walo et barrages (sorgho de décrue). Toutefois, une importante partie est importée du Mali et du Sénégal. La Mauritanie vit beaucoup plus de ses importations (70 % en bonne année agricole et jusqu'à 85 % en mauvaise année) que de sa production interne. Nouakchott est le principal marché de collecte pour les produits venant de l'extérieur et également le marché de distribution où viennent s'approvisionner les animateurs des marchés de distribution secondaire que sont les autres marchés référenciés. L'huile de cuisson est essentiellement consommée dans les zones urbaines. La vente des animaux est une mode d’existence dans toutes les zones et une importante source de revenus et de nourriture.


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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Mali

    The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) monitors trends in staple food prices in countries vulnerable to food insecurity. For each FEWS NET country and region, the Price Bulletin provides a set of charts showing monthly prices in the current marketing year in selected urban centers and allowing users to compare current trends with both five-year average prices, indicative of seasonal trends, and prices in the previous year.

    Le mil, le riz et le sorgho constituent les aliments de base de la majorité de la population malienne. Le mil est l'aliment le plus consommé traditionnellement, mais depuis 2005 le riz est devenu un substitut populaire chez les ménages urbains. Le sorgho est généralement plus important pour les ménages ruraux que pour les ménages urbains. Les marchés inclus sont révélateurs des conditions locales dans leurs régions respectives. Ségou est l’un des marchés les plus importants tant pour le pays que pour la région, dans la mesure où il se trouve dans une très vaste zone de production de céréales. Bamako, la capitale et le centre urbain le plus étendu du pays, fonctionne comme un marché de regroupement. Elle reçoit des céréales de Koulikoro, Ségou et Sikasso destinées à la consommation et fait également office de marché de regroupement pour les échanges avec les régions nord du pays (Kayes et Koulikoro) et avec la Mauritanie. Les marchés des régions déficitaires du pays (Tombouctou et Gao) reçoivent leurs approvisionnements en mil et en riz de Mopti, Ségou et Sikasso.


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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Chad

    Le Réseau de systèmes d’alerte précoce contre la famine (FEWS NET) surveille les tendances des prix des aliments de base dans les pays vulnérables à l'insécurité alimentaire. Pour chaque pays et chaque région couvert par FEWS NET, le Bulletin des prix fournit un ensemble de graphiques indiquant les prix mensuels de l’année commerciale en cours pour certains centres urbains, et permettant à l’utilisateur de comparer les tendances actuelles à la fois aux moyennes quinquennales, qui indiquent les tendances saisonnières, et aux prix de l'année précédente.

    Le sorgho, le mil, le maïs blanc et le riz local et d’importation sont les produits alimentaires les plus importants. La consommation de mil est la plus forte dans les régions est et nord du pays. Le riz local est un autre produit alimentaire de base, en particulier pour les ménages plus pauvres. Le riz importé et le maïs blanc sont le plus couramment consommés dans la capitale et ses environs. Le marché d'Atrone à N’Djamena, la capitale, est le marché le plus important pour les céréales. Moundou est un important centre de consommation pour le sorgho et le deuxième marché en importance après la capitale. Le marché d’Abéché est situé dans une zone de production au nord. Le marché de Sarh est à la fois un marché de détail local et un marché transfrontalier.


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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Burkina Faso

    Le Réseau de systèmes d’alerte précoce contre la famine (FEWS NET) surveille les tendances des prix des aliments de base dans les pays vulnérables à l'insécurité alimentaire. Pour chaque pays et chaque région couvert par FEWS NET, le Bulletin des prix fournit un ensemble de graphiques indiquant les prix mensuels de l’année commerciale en cours pour certains centres urbains, et permettant à l’utilisateur de comparer les tendances actuelles à la fois aux moyennes quinquennales, qui indiquent les tendances saisonnières, et aux prix de l'année précédente.

    Le mil, le maïs et le sorgho sont les produits alimentaires les plus importants pour la consommation ménagère. Le mil est le produit de base des ménages les plus vulnérables, tandis que le maïs et le sorgho contribuent aussi au panier alimentaire de la majorité des autres ménages. Le marché de Sankaryare est le plus vaste et le plus important de Ouagadougou; il approvisionne d’autres marchés du pays et dans la région. Koudougou se trouve dans l'une des régions les plus peuplées du pays, où une majorité des ménages dépend du marché pour son ravitaillement alimentaire. Djibo se situe dans la zone sahélienne, hautement vulnérable. Pouytenga est un marché de regroupement pour les produits du Nigeria, du Ghana, du Bénin et du Togo. Solenzo est un marché rural situé au milieu d’une zone de production excédentaire. Bobo Dioulasso est un important centre tant pour la consommation que pour la production : elle fait office de capitale économique du Burkina-Faso et se trouve dans une importante zone de production céréalière.


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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cabo Verde, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Togo

    Le Réseau de systèmes d’alerte précoce contre la famine (FEWS NET) surveille les tendances des prix des aliments de base dans les pays vulnérables à l'insécurité alimentaire. Pour chaque pays et chaque région couvert par FEWS NET, le Bulletin des prix fournit un ensemble de graphiques indiquant les prix mensuels de l’année commerciale en cours pour certains centres urbains, et permettant à l’utilisateur de comparer les tendances actuelles à la fois aux moyennes quinquennales, qui indiquent les tendances saisonnières, et aux prix de l'année précédente.

    L'Afrique de l’Ouest peut être divisée en trois zones agro-écologiques ou en trois bassins commerciaux (bassins de l’ouest, bassin du centre, bassin de l’est). Les deux sont importants pour l'interprétation du comportement et de la dynamique du marché.

    Les trois principales zones agro-écologiques incluent la zone Sahélienne, la zone Soudanaise et la zone Côtière où la production et la consommation peuvent être facilement classifiées. (1) Dans la zone Sahélienne, le mil constitue le principal produit alimentaire cultivé et consommé en particulier dans les zones rurales et de plus en plus par certaines populations qui y ont accès en milieux urbains. Des exceptions sont faites pour le Cap Vert où le maïs et le riz sont les produits les plus importants, la Mauritanie où le blé et le sorgho et le Sénégal où le riz constituent des aliments de base. Les principaux produits de substitution dans le Sahel sont le sorgho, le riz, et la farine de manioc (Gari), avec les deux derniers en période de crise. (2) Dans la zone Soudanienne (le sud du Tchad, le centre du Nigéria, du Bénin, du Ghana, du Togo, de la Côte d'Ivoire, le sud du Burkina Faso, du Mali, du Sénégal, la Guinée Bissau, la Serra Leone, le Libéria) le maïs et le sorgho constituent les principales céréales consommées par la majorité de la population. Suivent après le riz et les tubercules particulièrement le manioc et l’igname. (3) Dans la zone côtière, avec deux saisons de pluie, l’igname et le maïs constituent les principaux produits alimentaires. Ils sont complétés par le niébé, qui est une source très significative de protéines.

    Les trois bassins commerciaux sont simplement connus sous les noms de bassin Ouest, Centre, et Est. En plus du mouvement du sud vers le nord des produits, les flux de certaines céréales se font aussi horizontalement. (1) Le bassin Ouest comprend la Mauritanie, le Sénégal, l’ouest du Mali, la Sierra Leone, la Guinée, le Libéria, et la Gambie où le riz est le plus commercialisé. (2) Le bassin central se compose de la Côte d'Ivoire, le centre et l’est du Mali, le Burkina Faso, le Ghana, et le Togo où le maïs est généralement commercialisé. (3) Le bassin Est se rapporte au Niger, Nigéria, Tchad, et Bénin où le millet est le plus fréquemment commercialisé. Ces trois bassins commerciaux sont distingués sur la carte ci-dessus.


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    Source: UN Children's Fund
    Country: Nigeria

    By Krista van den Berg

    Children living in the Dalori camp in north-east Nigeria have seen violence and tragedy, but a day of fun activities gave them the opportunity to just be children.

    MAIDUGURI, north-east Nigeria, 30 December, 2016 – Just for a moment, Maimune could forget about her problems. It’s ‘Fun Day’ for children at Dalori camp for people who fled their homes because of violence in north-east Nigeria. It’s a day to play silly games and to make music with other children, to laugh and just be children.

    At just 12 years old, Maimune* already knows tragedy. She is one of thousands of girls who have been held captive by Boko Haram and she does not speak about what happened to her. She and her little brother were held by the group for a year and a half.

    One night, Maimune found an opportunity to escape. Her brother was not with her and she was faced with an agonizing decision. She had to leave without him, she decided. There is not a day that goes by that she doesn’t worry about what has happened to him.

    She was fortunate to find her mother at Dalori camp in the town of Maiduguri, the capital of Borno state, which is the worst-affected by the violence. “I was so relieved to see her, we both cried and hugged each other,” recalls Maimune. “But still, I am always thinking of my little brother.”

    “We hear so many stories like this,” says UNICEF Child Protection consultant Hauwa Magaji. “It is heartbreaking every time you hear them.”

    Hauwa and her team organized this party at the camp so the children had something to celebrate at the start of the holiday season. Children racing while balancing bottles of water on their heads, children playing drums and making noise – for a while, it is just a children’s party and the laughing and noise make it seem normal.

    “You might see just children playing, but it’s so much more than that,” says Hauwa. “It’s really important that we organize these kinds of events, where children are able to express themselves. For a while, they are not thinking about the bad things that have happened and it helps to reduce their stress.”

    Maimune especially loved the drums. “I enjoyed every bit of today and it was exciting! I loved beating the drum.”

    For Hauwa and her UNICEF colleagues, it was also a great way to start the holiday season. “I love it to see a smile on the children’s faces,” she says. “It encourages me in my work for them.”

    *Name changed to protect identity.


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    Source: Qatar Red Crescent Society
    Country: Niger

    January 1st, 2017 ― Doha: Qatar Red Crescent Society (QRCS) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) have recently signed a new memorandum of understanding (MoU) to continue their joint humanitarian efforts going on in Niger since 2012.

    The MoU seeks to enhance agricultural activities in Niger during the 2016-2017 season, by providing farmers in deprived areas with improved seeds, guidance, and technical support.

    A QRCS specialist group would supervise and advise the beneficiaries, in coordination with the Ministry of Agriculture and local authorities.

    A total of 4,100 kg of vegetable seeds would be distributed in 193 towns of 14 municipalities. The species covered include cabbage, lettuce, carrot, tomato, and corn.

    In preparation, a course was held for agricultural technicians and volunteers on the project's action plan and beneficiary selection criteria.

    Niger is one of Africa's poorest countries hit by climatic change, with years of food crises due to rainfall scarcity, to be added to the ineffective traditional techniques of agriculture.

    The country hosts thousands of Malian refugees, who fled the violence in their home country to settle in the Tillabéri and Tahoua border regions.

    Working there since 2011, QRCS operates primary health care centers at refugee camps, in cooperation with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). It also works closely with the World Food Programme (WFP) to treat malnutrition among children and mothers in Ayourou Town, Tillabéri.

    Thanks to its effective performance, QRCS was selected by UNHCR to be their main medical services provider in the country.

    End

    About Qatar Red Crescent Society (QRCS)

    Established in 1978, Qatar Red Crescent Society (QRCS) is a humanitarian charitable organization that aims to assist and empower vulnerable individuals and communities without partiality or discrimination. QRCS is a member of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, which consists of the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) in Geneva, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), and 190 National Societies. QRCS is also a member of several Gulf, Arab, and Islamic assemblies, such as: the Islamic Committee of International Crescent and the Secretariat-General of the Arab Organization of Red Crescent and Red Cross. In this legally recognized capacity, QRCS has access to disaster and conflict zones, thus serving as an auxiliary to the State of Qatar in its humanitarian efforts, a role that distinguishes it from other local charitable or philanthropic organizations.

    QRCS operates both locally and internationally and has ongoing international relief and development projects in a number of countries throughout the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Europe. QRCS's humanitarian actions include providing support in disaster preparedness, disaster response, risk reduction, and disaster recovery. To mitigate the impact of disasters and improve the livelihoods of affected populations, QRCS provides medical services, healthcare, and social development to local communities. It is also active at the humanitarian advocacy front. With the help of a vast network of trained, committed staff and volunteers, QRCS aspires to improve the lives of vulnerable people by mobilizing the power of humanity. As a reflection of its long-standing accomplishments and credibility, QRCS's Chairman, Dr. Mohammed Al-Maadheed, is former Vice-President of the IFRC.

    Qatar Red Crescent works under the umbrella of the seven international humanitarian principles: Humanity, impartiality, neutrality, independence, voluntary service, unity, and universality. For more information about Qatar Red Crescent, please contact Mr. Fareed Adnan, Head of Media Affairs, Communication Department, Tel.: +974 5583 7338, email: fareed@qrcs.org.qa. Or you can visit our website: www.qrcs.org.qa, or like and follow our social media pages:
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/QatarRedCrescent
    Twitter/ Instgram: @QRCS
    LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/qatar-red-crescent


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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: South Sudan

    Extreme levels of food insecurity expected across South Sudan in 2017

    Key Messages

    Extreme levels of food insecurity are expected across South Sudan through at least the first half of 2017. Food availability is likely to be lower than normal due to below-average production and volatile trade, and very high prices will further limit food access. Emergency (IPC Phase 4) outcomes already exist in several areas. In the absence of humanitarian assistance, some households in Northern Bahr el Ghazal and Unity could exhaust their capacity to cope and be in Catastrophe (IPC Phase 5). Continued emergency humanitarian assistance, and improved access, is needed urgently to save lives.

    Despite the ongoing harvest, levels of acute malnutrition remain at Crisis (IPC Phase 3) and Emergency (IPC Phase 4) thresholds in many counties. Given the likely early depletion of household stocks and continued constraints to normal livelihood activities, high levels of acute malnutrition are expected to persist throughout the outlook period.


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    Source: REACH Initiative
    Country: South Sudan

    Introduction

    This factsheet presents preliminary findings about the humanitarian needs in Budi County, Eastern Equatoria State. Between 11 - 14 November 2016, REACH interviewed 37 key informants (KIs) with recent knowledge from 30 settlements in this area. Due to the purposive sampling of KIs, who reported only on sectors which they were knowledgeable, findings are not statistically generalisable but remain indicative of the situation in assessed locations. Approximately 112,513 people lived in the area before the crisis.

    Budi County saw widespread displacement following the outbreak of conflict in Chukudum on 6 October 2016, which quickly spread to the rest of the county. Though the situation is reportedly now calm, access remains an issue due to security concerns, and NGOs have not yet re-established services there.
    The information presented in this factsheet seeks to inform humanitarian actors seeking to respond to humanitarian needs in the Budi County area.


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    Source: Sudan Tribune
    Country: South Sudan

    January 1, 2017 (JUBA) – War-torn South Sudan will experience extreme levels of food insecurity across the country in the first half of 2017, a new food security report show.

    Famine Early Warning Systems (FEWS Net), a body that provides early warning and analysis on food insecurity said in its new report that food availability is likely to be lower than normal due to below-average production and volatile trade and that very high price could also limit food access.

    Aid agencies say over 2.5 million people have been displaced by the conflict in South Sudan, with an estimated over a million said to have fled into neighbouring countries. The conflict between South Sudan’s rival factions, has led to deaths of thousands since it broke out in December 2013.

    "Despite the ongoing harvest, levels of acute malnutrition remain at Crisis and Emergency thresholds in many counties," FEWS Net said in a report released Saturday.

    "Given the likely early depletion of household stocks and continued constraints to normal livelihood activities, high levels of acute malnutrition are expected to persist throughout the outlook period,” it adds.

    The report also projects a likely upsurge in humanitarian needs within the country, citing the continued civil war.

    It, however, said emergency humanitarian assistance and improved access should continue to urgently save lives.

    According to the report, over 50 percent of the population in South Sudan’s oil-rich Unity state is already internally displaced and ongoing conflict in Mayendit, Rubkona and Leer resulted into new displacement of people last month.

    Food insecurity, the report further stressed, is particularly severe among internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Leer, the majority of whom are displaced to nearby swamps and lack access to food aid or basic health services.

    "Although Unity hosts the largest number of IDPs, internal displacement has increased most rapidly in Greater Equatoria, where the number of IDPs has increased 250 percent since July," it says.

    Also cited in the report is the insecurity in Eastern Equatoria region is forcing many to flee to Kenya, where the rate of refugee arrivals increased from about 300 people per week in September to over 1,000 people per week in November.

    (ST)


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