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    Source: Voice of America
    Country: Cameroon, Nigeria

    Moki Edwin Kindzeka

    March 04, 2016 9:15 AM

    YAOUNDE—Cameroon has repeatedly praised the work of civilian self-defense groups in the north who are assisting security forces in the war against Boko Haram. Soldiers have given the militia some training and the state has now handed over motorcycles and bicycles so militia can monitor border areas.

    Hundreds of young men armed with machetes and knives sing of their vow to protect their homes from Boko Haram insurgents.

    Rise of vigilantes

    The vigilantes rose up last year as the Boko Haram insurgency spilled over Nigeria’s borders. Militants have razed villages, murdered civilians and carried out a steady string of bomb attacks in northern Cameroon.

    Self-defense groups have been asking the state for motorcycles and bicycles so they can patrol the hilly, hard-to-reach border areas. They hope to stop militants from infiltrating and planting landmines.

    At a ceremony, Midjiyawa Bakari, governor of the Far North region, handed the bikes over.

    He said thanks to education efforts, locals are sharing information and people in border villages have been massively joining self-defense groups. He called on the militia to stay vigilant each time they use the motorcycles and bicycles to go hunt for suspicious visitors and report them. But he said those that have been killed have not died in vain and the country will always remember and honor them.

    Local religious leaders said a prayer over the equipment.

    Booby traps and landmines

    Among them was Imam Moustapha Djibril, who lost his two sons in a landmine explosion just one week ago. "Allah, God the mighty in power,” he said, “we ask you for peace, stability and prosperity for our country."

    There have been seven landmine explosions in just the past five days. Thirty-four people, including 11 soldiers, were killed and another 40 people injured. Authorities blame Boko Haram.

    Self-defense group leader, Hamadikou Falama said at the end of February militia stopped three teenage boys they didn’t know. He said they had to search them forcibly as the strangers refused to cooperate. He said vigilantes found explosive devices the boys were planning to install on the road. He said they handed two of the suspects over to security forces. The third escaped.

    The United States has sent military advisers and equipment to northern Cameroon. Officers from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) are training Cameroonian soldiers there on techniques to detect and dismantle landmines and explosive devices.

    Cameroonian authorities say vigilante groups do not have the proper equipment for this work and have asked militia to focus on monitoring their towns and villages and reporting anything suspicious to specialized services within the military.


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    Source: UN News Service
    Country: Algeria, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Western Sahara

    4 March 2016 – With a “triple peril” of environmental degradation, poverty and insecurity facing the Sahel, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said today during a visit to Mauritania that improving the situation in the region is a top priority for the United Nations.

    “You know my dedication to the Sahel,” Mr. Ban told those participating in an event on peace and security, which discussed the root causes of instability in the region. 

    “When I visited at the end of 2013, we mobilized the international community to find durable solutions,” he recalled. “The countries of the region can defeat these difficulties by working together, with the support of the international community,” he added.

    The UN estimates that one in seven Sahelians lack food, one in five children will die before their fifth birthday, and four and a half million people have been forced to flee their homes. Communities have also been struggling against harsh environmental conditions and worsening climatic shocks.

    “The international response has a new boost thanks to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Paris Agreement on climate change,” the UN chief declared. “We have another opportunity to strengthen global solidarity at the World Humanitarian Summitin Istanbul in May. I count on Sahelian leaders to attend.”

    The Sahel is a region spanning across eight African countries – Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Cameroon and Chad – many of which are dealing with a volatile security situation.

    “I am especially concerned about the interlinked activities of criminal groups and terrorist organizations. Local people pay the highest price,” warned the Secretary-General, noting that insecurity in Northern Mali has driven thousands of people from their homes, including some 48,000 refugees living in the Mbera camp in Mauritania.

    “The United Nations is ready to assist in countering terrorism and other asymmetric threats,” he continued. “In this, we insist on full respect for human rights and international humanitarian law – as a matter of moral responsibility and strategic effectiveness,” he stressed.

    Welcoming the African Union Nouakchott Process and its sustained focus on security and terrorism, Mr. Ban said Mauritania's engagement is “invaluable.” In his remarks, he saluted President Abdel Aziz's regional leadership and his role in establishing the 'G5 Sahel.'

    “We need to carry out these new initiatives. And we need enhanced regional support to the UN mission in Mali, MINUSMA,” he said. “I especially applaud the G5's decision to establish a regional cell in Nouakchott for the prevention of radicalization. This can complement my global Plan of Action to Prevent Violent Extremism.”

    Meanwhile, he stressed that youth across this region need better access to education and decent jobs. “They can be a powerful force for progress against violent extremism. The historic Security Council resolution 2250 recognizes that young people can actively shape peace, contribute to justice and heal societies.”

    He added that it is equally essential to empower women, including by ending female genital mutilation(FGM), and praised Mauritania's national policy against FGM – and similar efforts across the region. Furthermore, he welcomed the country's laws to penalize slavery and address torture. “Such abominable practices have no place in the modern world,” he stressed.

    Tomorrow, Mr. Ban will meet with Sahrawi refugees suffering terribly under harsh conditions in Algeria. “The world cannot forget their plight. The Sahrawi people must enjoy their human rights – especially the right to self-determination within the framework of a mutually acceptable political solution,” emphasized the UN chief.

    He underlined that his aim is to contribute to this solution and facilitate “genuine” negotiations so that Sahrawi refugees can return home to Western Sahara.

    “I am also deeply concerned about the situation in Libya,” he added. “There are alarming reports of widespread human rights violations, including serious abuses that may amount to war crimes. All those with influence must use it to calm the situation and stop the fighting. It is utterly irresponsible for any outside player to stoke the fires.”

    Ending his remarks, the UN chief said he is inspired by Mauritania's rich history, and that the world needs “such an open-hearted spirit to break down walls and forge trust.” 


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    Source: The New York Times
    Country: Cameroon, Nigeria

    By DIONNE SEARCEY

    MORA, Cameroon — At first, the attack had all the hallmarks of a typical Boko Haram assault. Armed fighters stormed a town on the border with Nigeria, shooting every man they saw.

    But this time, instead of burning homes and abducting hostages, the fighters gathered cows, goats and any kind of food they could round up, then fled with it all.

    Read more on the New York Times


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    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, Niger

    N'Djamena, Tchad | AFP | vendredi 04/03/2016 - 20:02 GMT |

    Les ministres de la Défense des Etats membres du G5 Sahel, créé pour lutter contre les jihadistes dans la région, ont adopté vendredi à N'Djamena un projet "d'implantation en Mauritanie d'un Centre sahélien d'analyse des menaces et d'alerte précoce (CSAMAP)", selon un communiqué final.

    Ils ont également décidé la création d'une école de guerre provisoirement dénommée "collège de défense du G5 Sahel", dont le lieu d'implantation n'a pas été précisé.

    Ils ont enfin recommandé à leurs chefs d'Etat la création dans chaque "Etat membre de groupes d'action rapide avec l'appui technique de la France et de l'Espagne, et le financement de l'Union européenne".

    Le G5 Sahel est composé du Burkina Faso, du Mali, de la Mauritanie, du Niger et du Tchad, tous pays confrontés aux attaques et attentats des divers groupes islamistes, affiliés à Al-Quaïda ou bien à l'Etat islamique (EI), et qui sévissent dans la bande sahélienne, du nord du Mali au bassin du Lac Tchad.

    La prochaine réunion annuelle des ministres de la Défense du G5 Sahel doit se tenir en janvier 2017 à Bamako.

    La France entretient dans la région une force de 3.000 hommes, au sein de son opération Barkhane basée à N'Djamena, pour lutter contre les islamistes.

    Yas-jpc/sla

    © 1994-2016 Agence France-Presse


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Gambia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Nigeria


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Nigeria


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    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Mali

    Mopti, Mali | AFP | samedi 05/03/2016 - 23:45 GMT

    Les représentants des quinze pays membres du Conseil de sécurité de l'ONU, en visite au Mali, ont appelé samedi à accélérer la mise en oeuvre de l'accord de paix, à trois semaines d'un forum "de réconciliation" dans le nord en proie à des attaques récurrentes.

    Arrivée vendredi soir à Bamako, la délégation s'est entretenue tôt samedi matin avec le Premier ministre malien Modibo Keïta, avant de se rendre à Mopti (centre), puis à Tombouctou (nord-ouest), où elle a échangé avec des autorités régionales, locales et différents acteurs du processus de paix, a constaté un journaliste de l'AFP.

    Pour l'ONU, "la priorité aujourd'hui est à la pleine mise en oeuvre de l'accord de paix", "l'accélération de (sa) mise en oeuvre (...) y compris et d'abord sur le terrain", avait indiqué le représentant de la France, François Delattre, lors de la rencontre avec le Premier ministre.

    Lors des échanges à Mopti et Tombouctou, il a notamment été question des défis sécuritaires neuf mois après la signature de l'accord de paix. Un document entériné dans un premier temps en mai 2015 par le gouvernement malien, les mouvements armés qui le soutiennent - la Plateforme -, puis en juin 2015 par les groupes rebelles à dominante touareg qui l'ont combattu dans le nord du pays - la Coordination des mouvements de l'Azawad (CMA).

    Les diplomates onusiens ont notamment été informés de la tenue, du 27 au 30 mars, d'un "forum pour la paix et la réconciliation" à Kidal, jusqu'à récemment sous contrôle de la CMA. Début février, la CMA et la Plateforme ont annoncé s'être entendues pour y cohabiter pacifiquement, quelques jours après l'arrivée sans heurts dans la ville de centaines de pro-Bamako.

    Des représentants de ces deux camps ainsi que du gouvernement ont annoncé leur décision d'organiser ce forum à l'issue de plusieurs jours de discussions en février à Bamako, d'après un communiqué conjoint publié par la presse locale.

    Une annonce saluée samedi par le chef de la Mission de l'ONU au Mali (Minusma), Mahamat Saleh Annadif, qui a affirmé attendre "avec beaucoup d'impatience" cette rencontre de Kidal. "Il est extrêmement important que nous conjuguions nos efforts pour que l'accord de paix soit intégralement appliqué", a-t-il ajouté.

    En 2012, le nord du Mali a été transformé en sanctuaire et en base d'opérations par des groupes jihadistes liés à Al-Qaïda après la déroute de l'armée face à la rébellion, d'abord alliée à ces groupes qui l'ont ensuite évincée. Les jihadistes ont été chassés et en grande partie dispersés à partir de janvier 2013 par une opération militaire internationale, qui se poursuit actuellement.

    Mais des zones entières échappent encore au contrôle des forces maliennes et étrangères. Longtemps concentrées dans le Nord, les attaques se sont étendues à partir de début 2015 vers le Centre, puis le Sud.

    A Mopti, les autorités régionales ont indiqué être confrontées à plusieurs difficultés pour le rétablissement de la sécurité, particulièrement dans des zones inondables et difficiles d'accès de cette région dans le delta intérieur du fleuve Niger. "Ce qui nous manque, c'est le lien aérien", a affirmé Boukary Koïta, du gouvernorat de la région.

    "Il y a encore des progrès à effectuer, c'est vrai, en matière de formation, d'équipement" notamment, a indiqué François Delattre.

    La visite de la délégation au Mali prend fin dimanche.

    sr-cs/gkg

    © 1994-2016 Agence France-Presse


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    Source: Voice of America
    Country: Niger, Nigeria

    Nicolas Pinault

    DIFFA, NIGER—Hundreds of thousands of people forced from their homes are now living in the Diffa region of eastern Niger. Makeshift camps are everywhere on each side of the RN1, the country's main highway. The asphalt is boiling hot.

    Here, refugees from Nigeria live next to displaced people from Niger. They are two nationalities but have one common fear: Boko Haram.

    Mataram Kodogo, a Nigerian, fled her village with her eight children for the relative safety of the Ngourtoua camp.

    “It was 2:30 a.m.; it was a Thursday. Boko Haram arrived in our village, shooting, killing people," she said. "It was every man for himself. People were fleeing undressed, without shoes. I put my baby on my back, took another child under my arm, and I dragged another.”

    Others in the camps tell similarly horrible stories. Even with the Niger army on patrol, displaced people and refugees are scared. Daily life is not easy.

    Hunger problem

    The food situation is at best precarious. Last year, the United Nations estimated that the region's harvest would not meet local needs, falling short by 100,000 tons of cereals.

    The U.N. refugee agency has said efforts to help the displaced are complicated because they are spread out for 30 kilometers along RN1 instead of being in a proper camp. Aid officials aren't even sure how many people they are dealing with.

    "We know that many people have no IDs," said Karl Steinacker, the U.N. agency's representative in Niger. "It is extremely difficult to say where they are from. But, as of right now, we have more displaced people than Nigerian refugees."

    He estimated the Diffa region's total population at 700,000, including 100,000 Nigerian refugees. "And at least half of them are displaced or in need,” he told VOA.

    Many refugees or displaced people say they would return to their homes if security improved, but the chances of this seem remote. Boko Haram is still active along the Komadugu Yobe River, the natural border between Niger and Nigeria.


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    Source: UN News Service
    Country: Mali

    5 March 2016 – The United Nations Security Council is in Mali today, the first stop of its visit to the African continent, where it underlined that the 15-member body is united in supporting the country's peace and reconciliation efforts. 

    “We are here—the whole Council is here with its entire weight, with one voice, and with the same wish to see Mali reconciled, Malians united to build peace and to continue building the great country you have,” Ismael Abraão Gaspar Martins, the Permanent Representative of Angola and Security Council President for the month of March, told reporters at a press conference in the capital, Bamako. 

    “It's the main message we're bringing with us,” he added. “During this visit, we will meet with Malians, we will be close to them instead of just listening from afar and reading the reports. We will let them know directly that our main objective is to see the rebirth of Mali.” 

    The Malian Government has been seeking to restore stability and rebuild following a series of setbacks since early 2012, including a military coup d'état, renewed fighting between Government forces and Tuareg rebels, and the seizure of its northern territory by radical extremists. The country has also been wracked by a series of humanitarian crises. 

    Echoing the Angolan Ambassador's message was France's Permanent Representative François Delattre, who said the road travelled by the West African country during these past years has been “spectacular.” Building on this progress, he explained that the Security Council is putting all its weight on three items in particular. 

    “First, it is important to give renewed impulse to the implementation of the peace accords. These mark a historic step, they mark the coming together of all Malian stakeholders and of the whole international community supporting the agreement,” he underlined, referring to the Agreement for Peace and Reconciliation, signed by the Government, the Coordination of Movements of Azawad, and the Platform coalition of armed groups. 

    “The second objective is to put all the Security Council's weight on the fight against terrorism which counters the peace agreement,” Mr. Delattre continued. “It is the reason why are honoring the Malian security forces which are at the forefront of this battle. We are also honoring the UN Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) which works alongside the country's people and authorities.” 

    Finally, he said the Security Council's third message is to promote reconciliation. “It's the key word I think,” the Ambassador stressed. “To move forward with reconciliation between all Malians, no matter where they are, so they feel includes in this dynamic I have described.” 

    “We are at your side. You have, dear Malian friends, the destiny of your country in your hands. We are at a key moment in the history of your country. We will support your efforts especially in the implementation of the peace agreement. You have a historic chance, so cease it,” he concluded.


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    Source: UN News Service
    Country: Mali

    5 mars 2016 – Une délégation du Conseil de sécurité de l'ONU se trouvait samedi en visite au Mali pour promouvoir la réconciliation et souligner combien il est important de donner une nouvelle impulsion à la mise en oeuvre des accords de paix.

    “Nous sommes là, avec le poids de tout le Conseil, avec la même voix, le même souhait de voir le Mali réconcilié, les Maliens ensemble pour bâtir la paix”, a déclaré le Représentant permanent de l'Angola et Président du Conseil de sécurité pour le mois de mars, Ismael Abraão Gaspar Martins, dans une déclaration à la presse à Bamako.“Notre principal objectif, c'est de voir le Mali renaître."

    “Le chemin parcouru par le Mali au cours des dernières années est spectaculaire. Et sur la base de cette dynamique, nous souhaitons vous apporter tout le poids du Conseil de sécurité autour de trois messages en particulier”, a déclaré de son côté, le Représentant permanent de la France auprès des Nations Unies, François Delattre.

    “Le premier, c'est combien il est important de donner une nouvelle impulsion à la mise en oeuvre des accords de paix”, a-t-il ajouté.

    “Le deuxième objectif c'est de marquer tout le poids du Conseil de sécurité dans la lutte contre le terrorisme qui s'oppose à cette mise en oeuvre de l'Accord de paix”, a-t-il encore dit. “Le troisième message, c'est d'apporter là aussi le poids du Conseil pour promouvoir la réconciliation, aller de l'avant dans la réconciliation de l'ensemble des Maliens, où qu'ils soient, pour qu'ils se sentent parties prenantes de cette dynamique”.

    Le 12 février, un camp de la Mission multidimensionnelle intégrée des Nations Unies pour la stabilisation au Mali (MINUSMA) à Kidal, dans le nord du pays, avait été la cible d'une attaque ayant causé la mort de six Casques bleus.

    A cette occasion, le Secrétaire général de l'ONU, Ban Ki-moon, avait réitéré que les attaques perpétrées contre la MINUSMA n'affaibliraient pas “la détermination des Nations Unies à soutenir le gouvernement malien, les parties signataires de l'accord de paix et le peuple malien dans leurs efforts pour parvenir à une paix et une stabilité durables »


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    Source: Qatar Charity
    Country: Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Gambia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal

    Al Kuwairi,

    "Coordination and cooperation between active humanitarian actors is necessary to offer better services, and humanitarian and development programs to the countries of the Sahel."

    Mr. Toby Lanzer,

    "We cannot stop the reasons behind the people's needs in Sahel unless we work using a methodology based on security, development and humanitarian work."

    As part of the coordination between Qatari Humanitarian Organizations and OCHA, a round table meeting was held in Doha about humanitarian work in the African countries of the Sahel. Its main objectives were to review the work of the humanitarian actors, to discuss the possible cooperation, and to build partnerships in the countries of the Sahel considering the exacerbating conditions of such countries.

    Mr. Toby Lanzer, the United Nations Assistant Secretary-General and Regional Humanitarian Coordinator for the Sahel, and the representatives of Qatari humanitarian societies and institutions attended the meeting. The Qatari organizations included: Qatar Red Crescent, Qatar Charity, Sheikh Eid Charity, Sheikh Thani bin Abdallah for Humanitarian Services (RAF), Al Faisal Foundation, Afif Foundation, Education Above All and Silatech. All the Qatari humanitarian organizations active in the Sahel displayed their achievements there through presentations.

    At the beginning of the meeting, Mr. Youssef bin Ahmed Al Kuwairi, QC's CEO, thanked all the people who attended the meeting which discussed a very important region in Africa. The Sahel includes a group of countries where Qatari charity organizations are active.

    "QC pays extra attention to this region when it implements its humanitarian projects and programs. It is clear through the fact that we have 5 headquarters in Chad, Niger, Mali, Burkina Faso and Mauritania. Through its international and local partners, QC works in the 11 countries of the Sahel," said he.

    As he also mentioned, in the last 3 years QC implemented more than 6,000 projects at a cost of around 148,000,000 QR covering most of the sectors. QC is still implementing more projects in the fields of education, health, water, sanitation, food security, livelihoods, economic empowerment and others.

    Mr. Al Kuwairi stressed on the importance of cooperating and coordinating with active humanitarian organizations. "Because Qatar Charity believes in its mission and the humanitarian principles of assisting others, it is willing to coordinate and cooperate with all international, regional and local organizations so as to offer humanitarian and developmental programs and services to the countries of the Sahel."

    Continuous Crises

    Mr. Lanzer said that the exacerbating needs for humanitarian aid are a result of a three dimensional crisis: instability, lack of security, and climate change. "We cannot stop the reasons behind the people's needs in Sahel unless we work using a methodology based on security, development and humanitarian work. The humanitarian actors must always follow up with the deep needs of the countries of the Sahel," said he.

    He highlighted the importance of cooperation between the active organizations participating in the development programs to achieve stability. Without such programs, the the need for humanitarian aids will be indefinite.

    Mr. Lanzer expressed his gratitude for the Qatari humanitarian organizations and commended their work and efforts. "We thank these organizations for expressing their willingness to cooperate and coordinate. We hope that this meeting will be very successful and that the results will be as great as expected. We also hope it would bring good for the people living in the Sahel."

    The work agenda of the round table included exchanging information about the work of Qatari humanitarian organizations in the Sahel, the projects in progress, and the fields they cover. It also covered the chances of cooperation and exchange of partnerships with OCHA, which is covering the humanitarian work in the Sahel. In addition, the meeting was to reinforce coordination mechanisms and exchange of information with the UN.

    The African Countries of the Sahel

    It is worth mentioning that the Sahel African countries comprise of 9 countries: Chad, Niger, Nigeria, Cameron, Burkina Faso, Mali, Mauritania, Senegal and Gambia. Based on the studies conducted by OCHA, the Sahel is one of the most important places for the main humanitarian operation centers for the year 2016. It is expected that 23,500,000 people might suffer from the lack of security of food, healthcare, severe malnutrition, dire shortage in drinking water, malfunction in sanitation and problems in education. The armed disputes and violence made 4,500,000 people displaced.

    Since QC always makes sure to offer the best humanitarian aids, it cooperates with international organizations; especially the United Nations. OCHA and QC have a distinguished relationship especially at the level of coordination.


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    Source: UN News Service
    Country: Algeria, Libya, Mali, Western Sahara

    6 mars 2016 – Alors qu'il se trouvait dimanche en visite à Alger, le Secrétaire général de l'ONU, Ban Ki-moon, a rencontré des responsables du gouvernement algérien, avec qui il a notamment discuté de la situation en Libye, au Mali et de la question du Sahara occidental.

    « Il nous arrive de Libye des informations alarmantes sur des actes graves qui pourraient constituer des crimes de guerre. Tous les acteurs extérieurs doivent user de leur influence pour calmer la situation. Si les choses ne progressent pas sur le plan politique, la crise humanitaire s'aggravera et les atteintes à la sécurité, y compris les attaques de Daech, se multiplieront et gagneront du terrain », a déclaré M. Ban lors d'un point de presse à l'issue d'une rencontre avec le Ministre des affaires étrangères, Ramtane Lamamra.

    Le chef de l'ONU a salué le rôle que joue l'Algérie sur cette question, notamment en accueillant les pourparlers organisés sous l'égide des Nations Unies.

    Il a aussi remercié le ministre de l'engagement que l'Algérie continue de manifester en faveur du Mali, en tant que principal médiateur du processus de paix. “Nous sommes convenus de continuer à pousser pour que la médiation aboutisse”, a-t-il dit.

    Le chef de l'ONU et le ministre ont parlé de la question du Sahara occidental. Samedi, Ban Ki-moon se trouvait à Tindouf, dans le sud de l'Algérie, où il a visité des camps de réfugiés sahraouis.

    “Les parties au conflit n'ont fait aucun progrès réel dans les négociations devant aboutir à une solution politique juste, durable et acceptable par tous, fondée sur l'auto-détermination du peuple du Sahara occidental”, a souligné M. Ban. “Le monde ne peut continuer à négliger les Sahraouis. Ils espèrent l'appui de la région, de l'ONU et de la communauté internationale. Nous devons réagir”.

    Il s'agit de la deuxième visite de Ban Ki-moon en Algérie. La première avait eu lieu en 2007, après les attentats terroristes dirigés contre les bureaux de l'ONU à Alger.

    « L'histoire a montré à de nombreuses reprises que toute stratégie de lutte contre l'extrémisme violent qui ne repose pas sur le respect des droits de l'homme est vouée à l'échec. Le respect des droits de l'homme est à la fois une obligation morale et un avantage tactique », a déclaré M. Ban.

    Le Secrétaire général a également rencontré le Président algérien Abdelaziz Bouteflika, avec qui il a notamment parlé du Mali et de la Libye.

    Lors d'un point de presse à l'issue de cette rencontre, M. Ban s'est félicité de l'adoption de la réforme de la Constitution algérienne par l'Assemblée nationale et le Sénat le 7 février 2016.

    « Je suis convaincu qu'il faut se pencher sur les difficultés que connait l'Algérie aujourd'hui », a dit M. Ban. « Je pense en particulier qu'il importe d'investir dans la jeunesse algérienne ».


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    Source: UN News Service
    Country: Mali

    5 mars 2016 – Une délégation du Conseil de sécurité de l'ONU se trouvait samedi en visite au Mali pour promouvoir la réconciliation et souligner combien il est important de donner une nouvelle impulsion à la mise en oeuvre des accords de paix.

    “Nous sommes là, avec le poids de tout le Conseil, avec la même voix, le même souhait de voir le Mali réconcilié, les Maliens ensemble pour bâtir la paix”, a déclaré le Représentant permanent de l'Angola et Président du Conseil de sécurité pour le mois de mars, Ismael Abraão Gaspar Martins, dans une déclaration à la presse à Bamako.“Notre principal objectif, c'est de voir le Mali renaître."

    “Le chemin parcouru par le Mali au cours des dernières années est spectaculaire. Et sur la base de cette dynamique, nous souhaitons vous apporter tout le poids du Conseil de sécurité autour de trois messages en particulier”, a déclaré de son côté, le Représentant permanent de la France auprès des Nations Unies, François Delattre.

    “Le premier, c'est combien il est important de donner une nouvelle impulsion à la mise en oeuvre des accords de paix”, a-t-il ajouté.

    “Le deuxième objectif c'est de marquer tout le poids du Conseil de sécurité dans la lutte contre le terrorisme qui s'oppose à cette mise en oeuvre de l'Accord de paix”, a-t-il encore dit. “Le troisième message, c'est d'apporter là aussi le poids du Conseil pour promouvoir la réconciliation, aller de l'avant dans la réconciliation de l'ensemble des Maliens, où qu'ils soient, pour qu'ils se sentent parties prenantes de cette dynamique”.

    Le 12 février, un camp de la Mission multidimensionnelle intégrée des Nations Unies pour la stabilisation au Mali (MINUSMA) à Kidal, dans le nord du pays, avait été la cible d'une attaque ayant causé la mort de six Casques bleus.

    A cette occasion, le Secrétaire général de l'ONU, Ban Ki-moon, avait réitéré que les attaques perpétrées contre la MINUSMA n'affaibliraient pas “la détermination des Nations Unies à soutenir le gouvernement malien, les parties signataires de l'accord de paix et le peuple malien dans leurs efforts pour parvenir à une paix et une stabilité durables »


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Mali, Niger


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Mali, Niger


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Mali, Niger


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Mali, Niger


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    Source: UN Children's Fund
    Country: Central African Republic, Chad

    Highlights

    • Chad has a prevalence of Global Acute Malnutrition among children aged 6 to 59 months of 11.7% and an estimated target Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM) caseload of 176,900 for 2016 (November 2015 SMART Nutrition Survey).

    • An inter-cluster assessment was carried out from January 14th to 18th to Liwa and Daboua, an area in the Lake region inaccessible since the Bagasola market attacks in October 2015. The mission has confirmed the existence of 22 IDPs sites with dire humanitarian needs in the sub-prefectures of Daboua (12 sites) and Liwa (10 sites).

    • Eight IDP sites in Liwa, Bagasola and Bol health districts have benefited from mobile clinics services funded by UNICEF. 1,628 patients, including 659 children under five years of age (40.5%), benefited from curative consultations.

    • In the Dar Es Salam refugee camp UNICEF supports a voluntary HIV testing center, where 42 of the 104 people tested (40.7%) had tested positive (35.5% men and 47.6% women) and were put under ARV treatment. In Bagasola 1,390 people were tested, of which 439 were positive (31.5%) and were put on ARVs. HIV has become a major health concern in the region with very high proportion of people testing positive.

    • In addition to funding for the Lake emergency, additional funds are urgently required for the response to the returnees from Central African Republic, which has received no new emergency funding in the last year. It is particularly urgent to mobilize the 4,900,000 USD needed to cover at least 52,000 cartons of RUTF by end of March in order to be able to secure the pipeline for the third quarter of 2016.

    SITUATION IN NUMBERS

    31 January 2016

    2,200,000 Children affected (UNICEF HAC 2016)

    176,900 Children under 5 with Severe Acute Malnutrition in 2016 (Nutrition Cluster 2016)

    90,000 Returnees from Central African Republic (DTM, November 2015)

    47,000 Displaced persons registered in the Lake Region (ORS, Feb 2016)

    UNICEF Humanitarian funding needs in 2016 US$ 62.4 million

    Situation Overview & Humanitarian Needs

    Impact of violence in the Lake Chad region

    The situation is dynamic as primary and secondary (or more) population movements continue in the Lake region, with military actions and attacks by Boko Haram. The latest suicide attacks took place on January 31 in Guité and Mitérié localities on market day, resulting in 3 deaths and 50 wounded.

    In the Lake region, there are currently 42 IDP sites (OCHA Map, 20 January 2016) and one refugee camp. It remains difficult to estimate the accurate numbers of people internally displaced due to multiple ongoing waves of displacements, lack of access to some areas due to security risks, and very limited resources. Authorities secured and opened the route from Bagasola towards Daboua in the Northwest of the Lake region at the end of December. However, in some areas West and South of Bol and Bagasola, humanitarian access remains limited due to security and logistical constraints. An inter-cluster assessment was carried out from January 14th to 18th to Liwa and Daboua, an area inaccessible since the Bagasola market attacks of October 2015. The mission has confirmed the existence of 22 IDP sites with dire humanitarian needs in the sub-prefectures of Daboua (12 sites) and Liwa (10 sites). It was estimated that 56,639 (11,244 households) displaced people live in the 22 sites.

    Food, NFIs and shelter, water, sanitation and hygiene, health, nutrition and education needs are huge and urgent especially in large sites established in the last quarter of 2015. Among these sites, Magui, Bourora Amma, Digou and Dileron are classified high priority based on the severity analysis conducted by the clusters, including criteria such as size and access to essential services like water and health. However the mission’s report highlights several smaller sites with high vulnerability due to lack of access to services. These needs are in addition to those identified in the Bol and Bagasola areas, where humanitarian actors continue to extend humanitarian assistance to cover all IDP sites.

    Two new prefectures have been created in the Lake region, thus raising the local authorities means available to face the ongoing security situation. Bagasola and Ngouboua sub-prefectures now make up the Kaya Department, while Liwa, Daboua and Kaiga sub-prefectures are the new Department of Fouli. The capital of the Region continues to be the town of Bol.

    Refugees, returnees from CAR and stateless persons in the South

    As of 31 January, 65,383 refugees from Central African Republic continue to live in Chad, according to UNHCR. In addition, according to the latest publicly available data from the Camp Coordination and Camp Management Cluster, about 90,000 returnees fleeing violence in Central African Republic live in camps and host communities in Southern Chad. At the end of 2015, the three national NGOs that manage the Central African Republic returnee sites in Southern Chad informed of their intention to scale down their presence to the bare minimum due to lack of payments. SECADEV, the Chadian Red Cross and ADES were contracted by the Chadian government as site managers in early 2014, but have not been paid since mid-2014. In addition, IRC, one the main providers of primary healthcare in the returnee sites announced the end of its funding for this activity as of 31 December 2015.

    A joint UNICEF and OCHA mission from 2nd to 5th January visited the returnee sites to take stock of the outstanding emergency needs in the sites and identify opportunities for transition solutions to bridge outstanding humanitarian and emerging development needs in a durable manner. As WFP covers food needs, the main concerns of returnees include access to livelihood activities, health and education services as well as other opportunities for the youth.

    Furthermore, statelessness and lack of administrative papers among adults makes it harder for them to move, find jobs and reduce aid dependency, an issue that continues to be at the center of advocacy by humanitarian actors.

    Food insecurity and malnutrition

    In addition to the impact of the Nigerian crisis on the country, the Sahelian region and parts of the south of the country are experiencing a decline in agricultural production due to poor rainfall during 2015, particularly in connection with El Niño. A survey conducted by the NGO Première Urgence in December 2015 in the region of Ouaddai in the East of the country estimated the cereal deficit at 21% and 24% respectively in the two departments where the assessment took place (Ouara and Assoungha). According to the SMART survey conducted in October- November 2015, Chad has a prevalence of 11.7% of global acute malnutrition, with 7 regions showing a rate above the crisis threshold (15%) and with alarming severe acute malnutrition rates.


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    Source: Government of the United States of America
    Country: Cameroon

    For women farmers in Cameroon, the land is their livelihood.

    “Growing vegetables and growing my garden is how I feed my family and make a living,” said Evelyne, an agriculturalist and president of her farming group in rural Cameroon. “It is how I help my daughters succeed in their studies.”

    But flourishing as a farmer often hinges on purchasing seeds and fertilizer and developing the business acumen necessary to thrive in a competitive market.

    Agriculturalists in Africa, like Evelyne, face multiple barriers to growing a bountiful harvest that is also financially successful, even after paying for farming inputs. The costs of fertilizers, pesticides, seeds, equipment, and transportation can dramatically reduce profits.

    That’s where Peace Corps Volunteers like Clare MacMillen come in.

    With the help of a Feed the Future partnership in the region, MacMillen and her Cameroonian counterpart Vitalis recently evaluated a market garden project that involved Evelyne’s farming group. As they interviewed group members, they discovered common anxieties and challenges: While the women tending the garden made strides in financing, growing and selling their produce together, many lamented losses in soil fertility, detrimental pest infestations, and the expense of chemical inputs.

    “Each time these answers popped up [Vitalis and I] would look at each other and nod, realizing a strong need in the area,” MacMillen said.

    MacMillen, taking into account the women’s interest in organic gardening, paired resources from a Feed the Future training she attended with Vitalis’ extensive agriculture and community development experience to pilot a project on organic fertilizer and pest management.

    “Once I explained my vision for the project, Vitalis took full control from rallying community support to executing the trainings to organizing transportation for us to visit the trainees' compost piles,” Clare said.

    Composting was new for the community, but it met their needs on multiple levels. It provided an environmentally-friendly gardening technique that would enrich the soil, and the women’s group was already interested in the health benefits of organic produce. Best of all, it was also free. The women already had all the raw inputs they needed to create a compost pile—green nitrogen-rich weeds they clear from their farms, dead grasses and other debris from harvesting corn or removing rice hulls, wood ash from cooking fires or baking mud bricks, soil with local microbes, and water.

    Working between three villages, MacMillen’s counterpart trained 144 farmers in producing compost, organic pest repellents and pest deterrents. All of the products used inexpensive local ingredients.

    They also discussed management, budgeting and marketing with seven agriculturalist groups, further strengthening the connections between farm and market. As a result of the trainings, one women’s group constructed two compost piles at their group's garden and built six piles at one member’s home garden.

    Motivated women’s groups are the key to improving soils and food security in Cameroon. “In many ways I was merely a catalyst,” MacMillen said. “The agriculturalists and people like Vitalis are the truly motivated, dedicated, and inspiring people who made this project work.”

    The Peace Corps serves as one of 11 federal departments and agencies contributing to the U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative, Feed the Future. Volunteers across Peace Corps’ six technical sectors have a rare opportunity to bring American leadership and ingenuity to the doorsteps of families facing serious challenges around the world. More than 4,000 Volunteers have taken a grassroots approach to promoting important food security messaging and practices since 2011.


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