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ReliefWeb - Updates

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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Burkina Faso, Mali
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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Burkina Faso, Mali
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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria
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    The aim of this Nigeria Regional Refugee Response Plan is to mobilize support for an inter-agency response to the refugee situation developing in south-east Niger, south-west Chad and northern Cameroon and to present the corresponding emergency programme needs. These countries are affected by a continuing influx of refugees from north-eastern Nigeria seeking safety from attacks by armed insurgents. UNHCR, together with the Governments of the countries of asylum, has already started to establish protection monitoring systems and coordinate initial emergency assistance, in close collaboration with the UN sister agencies, international and national NGOs.

    Since 2011, a militant insurgent group in Nigeria operating in the north-eastern Federal States of Yobe, Adamawa and Borno has been carrying out armed attacks on civilian populations in Nigeria. In May 2013, the Government of Nigeria declared a state of emergency with the imposition of curfews. Despite military interventions by the Government, the security crisis has continued to worsen, with growing numbers of victims of killings and abductions, and the destruction of social and economic infrastructures, including the disruption of education services in the affected areas. The conflict has resulted in the deaths of over 3,700 civilians to date and massive internal displacement of populations. An inter-agency mission fielded in May 2014 assessed that the number of conflict-generated IDPs was at that point over 650,000.

    Alongside the internal displacement, a growing number of Nigerians are seeking refuge in neighbouring countries:

    • It is estimated there are over 30,000 Nigerian refugees in northern Cameroon, some 20,000 of whom have so far been registered by UNHCR and over 6,000 have been relocated from the border to Minawao camp where multi-sectoral assistance is being provided.

    • Currently, Chad is hosting over 1,000 Nigerian refugees. A second wave of refugees (about 1,000) arrived in August 2014 on Lake Chad’s Choua Island; they are being relocated further away from the border to Ngouboua where the first group was settled last year.

    • More than 50,000 persons have fled Nigeria and sought refuge in the Diffa region of south-east Niger. The group includes Nigerian refugees, returning Niger nationals and third country nationals.

    • In both Niger and Chad, refugees have settled among local communities, whereas in Cameroon, because of the specific security challenges linked to cross-border movements from Nigeria by the insurgents, refugees are being encouraged by the Cameroonian Government to settle in an organized camp (Minawao).

    From the outset, UNHCR has been monitoring the evolving situation and providing protection responses and humanitarian assistance, in collaboration with the Governments, other UN agencies and civil society partners. In Cameroon, Chad and Niger contingency plans have been prepared for responding to a possible further deterioration of the situation and increased numbers of forcibly displaced people.


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    Source: UN Children's Fund
    Country: Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone
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    About 8.5 million children and youth live in areas affected by Ebola in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia

    GENEVA/DAKAR/NEW YORK, 16 September 2014 – UNICEF said today it needs over $200 million to respond to the Ebola outbreak that has claimed over 2,400 lives and ravaged communities across West Africa. This is part of a broader, six-month appeal for $987.8 million that governments and humanitarian agencies require to fight the disease.

    “Ebola is killing people and undermining futures,” said Afshan Khan, UNICEF Director of Emergency Programmes. “It is closing schools, destroying health systems and threatening the very fabric of communities. This is a crisis of enormous proportions.”

    Of the $200 million, nearly $65 million will go to UNICEF’s programmes in Liberia, around $61 million to Sierra Leone and more than $55 million to Guinea. An additional $10 million will help neighbouring countries be prepared for a potential spread of the disease within their borders. The remaining $9 million are required for regional coordination efforts.

    UNICEF estimates that 8.5 million children and young people under the age of 20 live in areas affected by Ebola in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. Of these, 2.5 million are under the age of five.

    From working with communities to raise awareness of the disease and providing essential hygiene supplies since the first days of the outbreak, UNICEF has stepped up its response as Ebola continues its deadly spiral. The children’s agency, present in all affected countries, has been rushing in essential supplies and providing life-saving information in the heart of affected communities on how families can protect themselves.

    Examples of such effort by UNICEF and its partners include:

    • With support from the World Bank, Japan and USAID, airlifting 544 metric tonnes of supplies to Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, with almost 50 flights since early August. These supplies include protective equipment, hygiene items and essential medicines.

    • Supporting the Government of Sierra Leone in conducting a three-day public awareness campaign, 19-21 September, by helping train volunteers and providing accurate information on Ebola.

    • Installing water and sanitation facilities in Ebola treatment units in the three countries.

    • Training community health volunteers, teachers and others and help spread life-saving information on Ebola.

    • Working to avert non-Ebola disease outbreaks and provide basic services to women and children.

    -Providing psychosocial support to children affected by Ebola.

    “We need to work with communities,” Khan said. “We can save lives now if every country, every agency that has the means to support, does so.”

    #

    About UNICEF
    UNICEF promotes the rights and wellbeing of every child, in everything we do. Together with our partners, we work in 190 countries and territories to translate that commitment into practical action, focusing special effort on reaching the most vulnerable and excluded children, to the benefit of all children, everywhere. For more information about UNICEF and its work visit: www.unicef.org

    Download multimedia content at: http://weshare.unicef.org/mediaresources.

    Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

    For further information please contact:

    Timothy LaRose, UNICEF Guinea, tlarose@unicef.org, +224 622 350 251
    Sarah Crowe, currently with UNICEF Liberia, scrowe@unicef.org, +1646 209 1590
    Issa Davies, UNICEF Sierra Leone, idavies@unicef.org, +232 76 601 310
    Laurent Duvillier, UNICEF Regional Office in Dakar, lduvillier@unicef.org, +221 777 403 577
    Najwa Mekki, UNICEF New York, nmekki@unicef.org, +1917 209 1804

    For additional resources:

    Photos and b-roll from Ebola-affected countriesUNICEF's work for children in Ebola-affected countries


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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua

    Poor rainfall in the region expected to impact harvests

    Key Messages

    • Poor households and small farmers in the dry corridor of Honduras and El Salvador will be Stressed (IPC Phase 2) from August to December due to well below-average 2014 Primera harvests, reduced income from coffee sector employment and sales, and above-average prices of red beans.

    • Poor households and migrants in the dry corridor of Nicaragua will face Minimal (IPC Phase 1) acute food insecurity through September due to reserves of basic grains and alternative work sources. However, Stressed (IPC Phase 2) food insecurity is expected during the October to December period due to very high 2014 Primera season losses and high red bean prices.

    • In Guatemala, Crisis (IPC Phase 3) food security outcomes will remain in the departments El Progreso, San Rosa, Zacapa, Chiquimula, Jalapa, and Jutiapa until October. A FEWS NET assessment in these departments found that there were losses of maize and bean crops of 80 to 100 percent among subsistence farmers. From November to December, incomes will improve during the period of peak labor demand, and food access and availability will improve with Postrera harvests. Stressed food insecurity will be present during this period. Crisis levels will be present in the Highlands until December, following the annual harvests in November/December.

    • In the Central America region, below-average Postrera harvests (November-December) are expected given the forecast for below-average rainfall for the dry corridor and the Pacific basin.

    • In Haiti, despite improvements in rainfall in late August, rainfall since early June continues to be 50-80 percent of normal in southern areas of Haiti and the Central Plateau. Below-average rainfall is expected for the remainder of the August-December rainy season, likely causing the second-below average harvest this year. A second consecutive poor harvest and reduced agricultural income would cause an early start in February to the lean season for poor households. Stressed food security outcomes will continue through the end of the year in parts of Artibonite, Northwestern, Northeastern, Southeastern, and Nippes departments. During October to December, Crisis food security outcomes are expected in parts of the Northeast and Center departments and Ile de la Gonave.


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria

    GENEVE, 16 septembre (HCR) – Le HCR a lancé un appel de fonds conjoint aux donateurs pour un montant de 34 millions de dollars afin de financer des opérations urgentes pour aider des dizaines de milliers de réfugiés nigérians au Cameroun, au Tchad et au Niger.

    Le HCR et 16 partenaires appellent les donateurs à contribuer d'urgence pour protéger et assurer une aide vitale à plus de 75 000 personnes ayant déjà fui de l'autre côté de la frontière depuis l'année dernière, lorsque les groupes insurgés ont intensifié leur campagne de terreur, de meurtres et d'enlèvements de civils au nord-est du Nigéria, dans les Etats de l'Adamaoua, de Borno et de Yobe.

    Le Plan d'aide aux réfugiés nigérians présentés aux donateurs aujourd'hui (mardi) couvre les besoins les plus immédiats en termes de protection et d'assistance pour jusqu'à 95 000 personnes qui auront fui le Nigéria d'ici la fin 2014. Etant donné le regain de violences et le nombre croissant de personnes fuyant le conflit, ce nombre devra probablement être révisé à la hausse.

    Le porte-parole du HCR Babar Baloch a déclaré que, durant le seul mois d'août, plus de 11 000 réfugiés ont rejoint le Cameroun et le Tchad. Quelque 15 000 civils sont arrivés dans la région de Diffa au Niger depuis début août. Beaucoup d'entre eux se sont installés sur des îles du Lac Tchad.

    En septembre, de récentes attaques dans les Etats de Borno et d'Adamaoua ont poussé de nouveaux réfugiés à rejoindre le Cameroun et le Niger. « Au Cameroun, les nouveaux arrivants ont trouvé refuge dans des bâtiments d'école et des églises. Certains sont hébergés par des familles hôtes alors que d'autres vivent et dorment en plein air. Le taux important d'infections respiratoires parmi les enfants est très préoccupant », a indiqué Babar Baloch.

    « Ce week-end, les réfugiés nouvellement arrivés ont dit à nos équipes à la frontière que des insurgés avaient attaqué leurs villages dans les régions de Gwoza, Bama, Pulka et Idagala dans l'Etat de Borno. Ils ont tout volé avant de brûler les maisons. Certains réfugiés sont gravement traumatisés après avoir vu les assassinats brutaux de leurs proches », a-t-il ajouté.

    Selon certains réfugiés, un groupe de 40 à 60 hommes armés sont arrivés dans leur village à moto, en disant aux villageois d'adopter un islam plus radical et de rejoindre leurs rangs, en menaçant de les tuer.

    Les réfugiés ont fui leurs maisons de nuit et ils ont marché pendant des jours avant d'atteindre une sécurité relative à Kolofata, Mora ou Fotokol au Cameroun. Les enfants sont arrivés épuisés après ce long voyage et ils s'étaient blessé les pieds. Selon des réfugiés, la plupart des villages du côté nigérian se sont vidés de leurs habitants. Il n'y resterait que des personnes âgées ou handicapées.

    Le HCR craint davantage d'attaques transfrontalières au Cameroun. De ce fait, nous avons commencé à transférer les réfugiés nouvellement arrivés vers le camp de réfugiés de Minawao, situé à environ 120 kilomètres plus à l'intérieur du pays. Depuis la dernière semaine d'août, près de 8 000 réfugiés ont été transférés vers ce camp, qui accueille aujourd'hui plus de 13 000 personnes.

    Cependant, la situation sécuritaire instable dans la région de l'Extrême-Nord au Cameroun entrave sérieusement cette opération de transfert. Plus de 13 000 réfugiés se trouvent toujours à la frontière avec le Nigéria. Au total, le Cameroun accueille quelque 43 700 réfugiés nigérians selon les autorités, y compris 26 753 d'entre eux qui ont été enregistrés par le HCR. Des dizaines de personnes continuent d'arriver chaque jour.

    Au Niger, les civils continuent à arriver en nombre croissant. Plus de 70% d'entre eux sont des femmes et des enfants. Beaucoup ont fui les récentes attaques sur Doron Bagga, d'autres partent de peur que la menace des insurgés ne se rapproche de leurs villes et villages. L'escalade de la violence au Nigéria et la menace permanente à la périphérie de Maiduguri, la capitale de l'Etat de Borno, conduiraient à un afflux encore plus important dans les pays voisins. De nombreux ressortissants tchadiens arrivent également. Ils transitent par le Niger lors du retour vers leur pays.

    Babar Baloch a souligné que les personnes déplacées cherchent un hébergement dans les villages et leur présence porte une pression considérable sur les communautés hôtes. Ces communautés se trouvent dans des zones confrontées à l'insécurité alimentaire chronique, des problèmes environnementaux et une pénurie de services essentiels. Par conséquent, les efforts humanitaires se concentrent sur le renforcement des capacités et des services au niveau local, y compris pour les établissements de santé et d'éducation, en impliquant également les communautés d'accueil.

    De plus, les autorités nigérianes ont demandé l'appui du HCR pour mieux protéger les quelque 650 000 personnes déplacées à l'intérieur des six États du Nord-Est du Nigéria, y compris les trois États où l'état d'urgence (Adamaoua, Borno et Yola). Avec la Commission nationale des droits de l'homme et les ONG nationales, nous mettons en place un système de surveillance en matière de protection qui nous permettra d'identifier et de définir des problèmes en matière de protection, suivi par une réponse adéquate.

    Le HCR, dans le cadre de l'effort de secours des Nations Unies, lance un appel de fonds supplémentaire d'un montant de 5,5 millions de dollars pour ces activités au Nigéria.


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    Source: World Bank
    Country: Senegal

    LES POINTS MARQUANTS

    • Grâce à la gestion communautaire, les pêcheurs sénégalais de Ngaparou bénéficient à nouveau de stocks halieutiques abondants.
    • Des solutions durables comme la création des zones protégées, des règles de gestion de pêche exigeantes, la maîtrise de l’effort de pêche et l’amélioration de l’équipement de production ont déjà permis l’augmentation des revenus des pêcheurs.
    • Les habitants de Ngaparou retrouvent leur fierté et partagent leur savoir-faire avec des pays voisins tels que le Liberia, le Sierra Leone et le Cabo Verde.

    NGAPAROU le 10 septembre 2014 - Pendant des générations, les habitants de Ngaparou, un village de la côte sénégalaise à 64 kilomètres au sud de Dakar, ont pêché dans les eaux de l’océan Atlantique remplissant filets et assiettes des richesses de la mer.

    L’augmentation de la pêche illégale et la surpêche engendrent toutefois la disparition de plusieurs espèces, confrontant les villageois de Ngaparou à une baisse d’activité et une perte de revenue.

    Open QuotesJe suis toujours impressionnée par la fierté retrouvée dont parlent les villageois. Je pense que celle-ci vient du fait qu’ils ont démontré leur capacité à s’auto-organiser en tant que groupe, malgré les difficultés liées au caractère pionnier de l’initiative Close Quotes

    Bérengère Prince
    Spécialiste en gestion des ressources naturelles, en charge du Projet Régional des Pêches en Afrique de l’Ouest

    Pour préserver leurs moyens de subsistances, la communauté s’est alors mobilisée en établissant le Comité local des pêcheurs (CLP) de Ngaparou, un groupement de pêcheurs, qui a mis en œuvre un projet de cogestion visant à assurer une gestion équilibrée des ressources marines. Doté par la Banque mondiale d’un fonds de 15 millions de dollars, ce volet sénégalais du Programme Régional des Pêches en Afrique de l'Ouest (PRAO), apporte des solutions durables aux problèmes de surexploitation de ressources halieutiques et permet aux habitants de bénéficier d’un filet de sécurité sur le plan social.

    Pour s’attaquer au problème de la surpêche, le CLP a dû convaincre les pêcheurs de Ngaparou « qu’il vaut mieux s’abstenir de pêcher durant certaines périodes, car le rendement des pêches est nettement supérieur lorsque les zones ainsi protégées sont rouvertes », selon Mansour Ndour, facilitateur local du projet.

    Le CLP a divisé le périmètre de pêche en trois zones d’une superficie de 3 kilomètres de large sur 12 kilomètres de long. « Nous avons une zone fermée, où toute pêche est interdite, une zone de récif et une zone où la pêche est permise pendant une certaine période de l’année, mais dans laquelle nous appliquons des procédures plus strictes que celles en vigueur sur le plan national, notamment en matière de filets de pêche », explique M. Ibou Ndoye, pêcheur et membre du CLP.

    Concernant l’impact de la cogestion, les chiffres parlent d’eux-mêmes : le poids moyen des langoustes débarquées a augmenté de 72%, passant de 295 grammes en 2005 à 420 grammes en 2010. Les rendements en langouste des pêches ont plus que doublé, de 1,5 kg par pêche en 2006 à 3,5 kg par pêche en 2010; les espèces démersales (vivant près des fonds) sont progressivement réapparues; les espèces pélagiques (vivant en pleine mer) et les juvéniles prolifèrent dans l’aire de cogestion.

    La protection contre la violation des zones régulées est un exercice difficile pour les surveillants communautaires, qui réalisent en moyenne 20 sorties mensuelles afin de chasser les braconniers de la mer. L’avenir de cette surveillance est incertain car les pêcheurs-surveillants bénévoles opèrent sans statut légalement défini et sans prise en charge lorsqu’ils sont victimes d’agressions de la part de pêcheurs récalcitrants.

    Les femmes de Ngaparou ont également vu leurs revenus augmenter grâce à la valorisation des produits cogérés. Selon Waré Signaté, mareyeuse et membre du CLP, « les femmes gagnent plus d’argent grâce au camion frigorifique mis à notre disposition par le CLP. Nous sommes désormais capables de transporter poisson et langoustes sur le marché de la ville de Mbour, au lieu de les brader à bas prix à des mareyeurs venus d’ailleurs ».

    « Au-delà des résultats positifs du projet, je suis toujours impressionnée par la fierté retrouvée dont parlent les villageois. Je pense que celle-ci vient du fait qu’ils ont démontré leur capacité à s’auto-organiser en tant que groupe, malgré les difficultés liées au caractère pionnier de l’initiative », constate Bérengère Prince, spécialiste en gestion des ressources naturelles, en charge du PRAO.

    Il n’est pas étonnant que des visiteurs des autres régions du Sénégal et des délégations étrangères, notamment du Liberia, de la Sierra-Leone ou du Cabo Verde, viennent apprendre auprès des pêcheurs de Ngaparou les meilleures pratiques pour gouverner la pêche artisanale et en tirer plus de profits de façon durable.


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    Source: World Bank
    Country: Senegal

    STORY HIGHLIGHTS

    • Community-based fisheries management in Ngaparou, Senegal, has led to the restoration of abundant fish stocks throughout the area.
    • Sustainable solutions such as the creation of protected areas, strict fisheries management rules, fishing regulations, and the use of more modern fish processing equipment have resulted in higher incomes for Ngaparou’s fishermen.
    • The improvement in fishing conditions is not only a source of pride for the people of Ngaparou, but also a source of inspiration to neighboring countries such as Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Cape Verde.

    NGAPAROU, September 10, 2014 - For generations, the fishermen of Ngaparou, a Senegalese coastal village 64 kilometers south of Dakar, have relied on the Atlantic ocean’s wealth of fish and crustaceans to fill their nets, their wallets, and their stomachs.

    However, recent surges in illegal fishing, resulting in overfishing, have threatened to eliminate several species that could once be found in abundance, leaving Ngaparou’s villagers vulnerable to stark poverty.

    Open QuotesI am really impressed by the sense of a newly rediscovered pride expressed by the villagers. I believe this comes from the fact that they have demonstrated their ability to organize themselves as a group to implement a larger communal strategy, despite the challenges stemming from such a novel initiative Close Quotes

    Bérengère Prince
    Senior Natural Resource Management Specialist in charge of the West Africa Regional Fisheries Program

    As the situation became dire, worried fishermen rallied the entire village to take action in an effort to save their livelihoods and maintain their way of life. The village came together to establish the Local Fishermen’s Committee of Ngaparou (known by its French acronym, CLP), with the goal of implementing a community-based fisheries management aimed at restoring fish stocks and promoting a healthy marine environment. Supported by $15 million dollars in funding from the World Bank, this Senegalese component of the West Africa Regional Fisheries Program (WARFP)enables the people of the Ngaparou to confront the challenge of over-exploited fish resources with sustainable solutions while benefiting from a social safety net.

    To tackle the problem of overfishing, the CLP had to convince fishermen in Ngaparou “that it was better to refrain from fishing in certain zones in order to benefit from markedly higher fishing yields when these areas, which were subject to protection, are reopened,” explains Mansour Ndour, the local project facilitator.

    With the agreement and cooperation of the village’s fishermen, the CLP divided Ngaparou’s fishing perimeter into three areas spanning 3 kilometers wide and 12 kilometers long. “We have a closed area where all fishing is prohibited, and a reef area where fishing is allowed during certain periods of the year and where we apply stricter fishing procedures than even those in effect nationally, particularly with respect to fishing nets,” says CLP member Ibou Ndoye.

    However ensuring compliance with the rules concerning the protected areas has proved to be difficult. Despite the fact that voluntary community surveillance missions perform an average of 20 trips per month to drive away illegal fishermen, there continues to be problems with poachers who often use violence to threaten surveillance volunteers. Furthermore, the future of this surveillance is uncertain given that these volunteers operate without a legally defined status and lack access to any kind of recourse when they are victims of attacks.

    While attacks at sea and changing traditional habits can be challenging, the CLP continues to persevere as the rewards reaped are well worth the work with statistics reflecting the CLP’s significant impact over the past few years. The average weight of lobsters caught in the area has increased by 72%, from 295 grams in 2005 to 420 grams in 2010. Lobster yields have more than doubled from 1.5 kilograms per catch in 2006 to 3.5 kilograms per catch in 2010. Demersal fish species that live on the ocean floor have gradually reappeared and pelagic (deep-sea) species as well as juvenile fish flourish in the community managed zone.

    The women of Ngaparou are also benefiting from the positive impact of the CLP’s community-based management strategy and the higher yields of fish captures. Waré Signaté, a fishmonger and member of the CLP, has seen an increase in her income as well as the incomes of women around her thanks to the use of a refrigerated truck, put at their disposal by the CLP. “We are now able to transport fish and crustaceans to the market of Mbour instead of selling them off cheaply to wholesale fish merchants who come from other areas,” says Signaté.

    “Beyond the positive results of the project, I am really impressed by the sense of a newly rediscovered pride expressed by the villagers. I believe this comes from the fact that they have demonstrated their ability to organize themselves as a group to implement a larger communal strategy, despite the challenges stemming from such a novel initiative,” notes Bérengère Prince, Senior Natural Resource Management Specialist in charge of the WARFP.

    It comes as no surprise that visitors from other regions of Senegal and foreign delegations from Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Cape Verde travel to Ngaparou to draw inspiration and learn from the accomplishments of this coastal village in the hopes of recreating this success.


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Burkina Faso, Mali
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    Source: World Vision
    Country: Guatemala
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    Guatemala enfrenta una nueva crisis humanitaria, un “Estado de Calamidad Pública” para atender a los afectados por los efectos de la canícula prolongada fue declarada por Gobierno de la República el pasado 26 de agosto, según Decreto Gubernativo 3-2014, oficializado por 30 días en 16 departamentos del país. Las acciones estarán focalizadas en los departamentos de Jutiapa, Chiquimula, Zacapa, Huehuetenango, Sololá, Totonicapán, Chimaltenango, San Marcos, Guatemala, Retalhuleu, Baja Verapaz, Santa Rosa, Quiché, El Progreso, Suchitepéquez y Jalapa.


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    Source: World Vision
    Country: Guatemala
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    Contexto

    La canícula prolongada, sin precedentes en 40 años, ha provocado daños en las siembras de primera, además de retrasos y daños en la siembra de postrera (segunda siembra) y ha dado como efectos escasez de alimentos, desempleo agrícola y altos precios de los granos básicos, aunado a la crisis de la roya que redujo el nivel de empleo agrícola vinculado a esa actividad económica.

    Y el panorama que se espera no es muy alentador, un periodo de lluvias por debajo de lo normal en septiembre, octubre y noviembre (con 56% de probabilidades, según FEWS NET).

    La canícula severa asociada a la llegada del Fenómeno del Niño que ha tenido lugar en Centroamérica durante el mes de Julio y agosto, ha provocado cuantiosas pérdidas en los cultivos de granos básicos (maíz y frijol) en el corredor seco, áreas del occidente y sur de Guatemala.

    Según los reportes del gobierno, se ha perdido el 80% del maíz y el 63% del frijol de la siembra de primera en el área evaluada, de los 16 departamentos declarados en el estado de calamidad. El balance anual se obtendrá posterior a la siembra de postrera que se puede estimar en octubre próximo; sin embargo se estiman pérdidas oficiales superiores a los Q631 millones hasta el momento.

    En los departamentos contemplados en el “Estado de Calamidad Pública”, acordado por el gobierno, se ha identificado que se verán afectadas más de 230 mil familias en 3,300 comunidades de 160 municipios por la sequía.


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    Source: Government of France
    Country: France, Niger

    Signature au Niger de la convention de financement du projet Initiative Santé Solidarité Sahel (I3S). Le Niger est le premier pays bénéficiaire de cette initiative française pour l'accès aux soins des enfants du Sahel, qui vise à accompagner les pays politiquement engagés dans la mise en place de systèmes solidaires d’accès aux soins en faveur des enfants de moins de 5 ans.

    C'est en présence de MM. Issoufou et Hollande, que la convention de financement du projet Initiative Santé Solidarité Sahel (I3S), a été signée à Niamey par Anne Paugam, le 18 juillet dernier.

    Le projet contribuera à améliorer le système actuel de gratuité des soins pour les enfants, ainsi que la disponibilité des médicaments et des intrants pour traiter la malnutrition.

    Les fonds I3S, mobilisés à hauteur de 30 M€ pour les pays du Sahel bénéficiaires de l’initiative sont issus d’une partie (10%) des recettes de la taxation sur les transactions financières (TTF) de 2013. La convention de financement est d’un montant de 6 M€.


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    Source: European Commission Humanitarian Aid department
    Country: Burkina Faso, Mali, Mauritania, Niger

    The European Commission is increasing by €5 million its humanitarian funding in Mali. This will bring new European support to the victims of extreme food insecurity and renewed violence in the north of the country. The new assistance package brings the total humanitarian aid funding to Mali in 2014 to €40 million.

    "Hunger and conflict continue to claim lives and keep hundreds of thousands of Malians in desperate crisis. The European Commission is responding to the need to scale up its assistance to food insecure Malians in the north, to the newly displaced populations and to the 140 000 refugees in Burkina Faso, Mauritania and Niger who rely on humanitarian assistance for their survival," said EU Commissioner Kristalina Georgieva, responsible for International Cooperation, Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Response.

    The new funding will provide emergency food assistance to more than one million people, including pastoralists who have lost their herds due to this year's particularly long lean season. The newly displaced will also be targeted with aid, including the provision of water and sanitation facilities in the areas where they have found shelter. Malian refugees in the neighbouring countries will also continue to receive humanitarian assistance thanks to the new aid decision.

    Part of the European assistance will contribute to the continuation of a humanitarian air service: essential given the frequency of targeted attacks and explosive devices on the roads.

    Background

    Renewed conflict in northern Mali between the Malian army and armed groups has led to new population displacements since May. Access to basic services remains interrupted due to the lack of progress in the negotiations between the various sides in the conflict.

    In parallel, Mali is affected by a lingering food and nutrition crisis: 3.7 million Malians are threatened by food shortages and more than half a million children are at risk of malnutrition.

    Access to the people in need of assistance is a growing concern. Security incidents are more and more frequent and hamper the work of humanitarian organisations which attempt to provide vital services such as food assistance and healthcare in the North.

    The European Commission has released €178 million to assist Malians since the beginning of the conflict in 2012.

    For more information

    The European Commission's humanitarian aid and civil protection:

    http://ec.europa.eu/echo/index_en.htm

    Commissioner Georgieva's website:

    http://ec.europa.eu/commission_2010-2014/georgieva/index_en.htm

    Contacts : David Sharrock (+32 2 296 89 09) Irina Novakova (+32 2 295 75 17)


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    Source: World Food Programme
    Country: Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sudan, World, South Sudan
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    Highlights

    Sahel

    • The Sahel region has undergone significant and widespread rainfall deficits, leading to significantly below average vegetation levels.

    • Worst affected areas are Senegal, southern Mauritania, eastern Niger, NE Nigeria and central Chad • There was some recovery from late July, in particular in Niger and Chad. However, Senegal and Mauritania remained affected by persistent rainfall deficits.

    • Hopes of an extended rainfall season have now faded. Early September rains were also poor in the affected regions (e.g. Senegal) and unremarkable in areas under recovery (Niger).

    • Serious impacts on agricultural production in Senegal and Mauritania are now inevitable. Recovery window in Niger and surrounding countries is quickly narrowing.

    Eastern Region (Sudan, Ethiopia)

    • After promising early rains, drier than average conditions have affected central and eastern Ethiopia for the remainder of the season.

    • Sudan has had a varied season with dryness episodes but also heavy and intense rainfall events leading to floods in West Darfur, Kordofan and Khartoum regions. Cereal producing regions in eastern Sudan show clear signs of poor crop performance.

    • South Sudan has had a good season so far with early onset of the growing season and no major rainfall deficits. Recent heavy rains have led to localized flooding in along riverine areas in Unity and Jonglei States.


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    Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
    Country: Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Guinea, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Uganda
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    • Seasonal shower activity weakens, leaving many anomalously dry areas as the ITCZ/ITF withdraws across the Sahel.
    • Heavy September rains lead to flooding, and damaged crops throughout many parts of Uganda.

    1) Below-average rains during the Belg season and a late onset of the Kiremt rains have led to persistent moisture deficits, which have delayed planting and negatively affected the development of already-planted crops over the Arsi and West Arsi zones in central Oromia of central Ethiopia. 2) Despite a seasonable return of precipitation during August, moisture deficits have persisted in northwestern Senegal. The delayed onset of the season in July has already resulted in deteriorated conditions and affected crops on the ground. 3) An early cessation of Mar-May seasonal rainfall, as well as, an anomalously dry July have led to deteriorated crop and degraded pasture conditions across several zones in central and northern Ethiopia. 4) Poor seasonal rainfall since the middle of August has led to late-season moisture deficits, increasing the likelihood for adverse ground impacts throughout many parts of western and southern Niger, eastern Mali, and northern Nigeria. Below average rains are forecast in the region for the upcoming outlook period. 5) Several consecutive weeks of enhanced rainfall has resulted in widespread flooding, thousands of displaced people, and extensive crop damages across many provinces of eastern Uganda. 6) Poor July rains throughout several local regions in Mali have resulted in degraded crop and pastoral conditions. August and September rains have continued to help improve ground impacts.


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    Source: UN Children's Fund
    Country: Benin, Cameroon, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, Niger, Togo
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    Tchad (Français)

    Le 24 août 2014, une femme de 37 ans a été conduite d’urgence dans le centre de santé de Bipare dans le district de Léré suite à des diarrhées et vomissements. Ses enfants ont été admis par la suite avec les mêmes symptômes. Les tests rapides cholera sur 13 parents se sont révélés positifs. Le 01 septembre 2014, le laboratoire de référence nationale a isolé le choléra dans 10 échantillons.

    Selon la genèse de l’apparition de la maladie sur le territoire Tchadien, la première victime venait d’une visite dans un village camerounais. Le village Bipare est séparé du Cameroun par le fleuve. Les habitants de part et d’autre de la frontière appartiennent aux même familles et les échanges commerciaux sont fréquents (fréquenta&on des marches hebdomadaires transfrontaliers). Au total, 25 cas et 0 décès ont été enregistrés dans le district de Léré dans les aires de sante de Bipare et de Guegou. De l’autre cote de la frontère, dans la région du Nord Cameroun, l’épidémie est toujours en cours avec 93 cas dont 7 décès enregistrés pendant la semaine 35.

    La transmission suite aux visites à domicile et au centre de santé est élevée en début d’épidémie. Les mesures d’isolement des pa&ents, de sensibilisa&on de l’entourage du pa&ent et de désinfec&on des domiciles sont clefs. Des ac&ons spécifiques doivent être menées en ce qui concerne les marches transfrontaliers et les mouvements de populaton.

    Chad (English)

    On 24 August 2014, a 37 year old woman was admitted in the health center of Bipare, ditrict of Lere following diarrhea and vomiting. Her children were subsequently admitted with the same symptoms.
    Cholera Rapid Diagnostic Tests performed on 13 parents were positives. On 01 September 2014, the national laboratory has isolated the vibrio cholerae in 10 stool samples.

    According to the genesis of disease’s onset on Chadian territory, the first victim came from a visit to a village in Cameroon. The village of Bipare is separated from Cameroon by the river. The people on both sides of the border belong to the same families and trades are frequent (weekly border markets). Up to date, a total of 25 cases and 0 deaths were recorded in the villages of Bipare and Poheme, district of Lere. On the other side of the border, in the region of North Cameroon, the outbreak is still ongoing with 93 cases including 7 deaths registered during week 35.

    Transmission following visits to the health center and to the home of the sick person is high. Isolation measures, awareness of the parent's kinship and household disinfection are key. Specific ac&on should be performed regarding border markets and population movement.


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    Source: World Food Programme
    Country: Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sudan, South Sudan
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    Highlights

    Sahel

    • The Sahel region has undergone significant and widespread rainfall deficits, leading to significantly below average vegetation levels.

    • Worst affected areas are Senegal, southern Mauritania, eastern Niger, NE Nigeria and central Chad • There was some recovery from late July, in particular in Niger and Chad. However, Senegal and Mauritania remained affected by persistent rainfall deficits.

    • Hopes of an extended rainfall season have now faded. Early September rains were also poor in the affected regions (e.g. Senegal) and unremarkable in areas under recovery (Niger).

    • Serious impacts on agricultural production in Senegal and Mauritania are now inevitable. Recovery window in Niger and surrounding countries is quickly narrowing.

    Eastern Region (Sudan, Ethiopia)

    • After promising early rains, drier than average conditions have affected central and eastern Ethiopia for the remainder of the season.

    • Sudan has had a varied season with dryness episodes but also heavy and intense rainfall events leading to floods in West Darfur, Kordofan and Khartoum regions. Cereal producing regions in eastern Sudan show clear signs of poor crop performance.

    • South Sudan has had a good season so far with early onset of the growing season and no major rainfall deficits. Recent heavy rains have led to localized flooding in along riverine areas in Unity and Jonglei States.


    0 0

    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, Côte d'Ivoire, Guinea, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Togo
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    0 0

    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Algeria, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Guinea, Mali, Mauritania, Niger
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    0 0

    Source: Government of Guatemala
    Country: Guatemala

    Un total de 6 mil 800 familias de 11 municipios del departamento de San Marcos que se incluyen en el listado de afectados por la canícula prolongada, recibirán alimentos y apoyo técnico, para paliar la emergencia provocada por el cambio climático.

    La entrega de la ayuda para los damnificados está siendo coordinada por las autoridades del Ministerio de Agricultura, Ganadería y Alimentación y la Secretaría de Seguridad Alimentaria y Nutricional, entre otras instituciones con sede en San Marcos, informó Luis Rivera, gobernador.

    El funcionario explicó que esos núcleos perdieron la cosecha de granos básicos por la sequía. “Los encargados de las instituciones nos hemos comprometido a trabajar y llevar a tiempo las raciones a quienes las necesitan. Contamos con el apoyo de vehículos del Ejército”, agregó.

    Rivera manifestó que las familias recibirán alimento durante 6 meses. “La ayuda consiste en 1 quintal de maíz, 30 libras de frijol y harina fortificada. Además, se brindará apoyo técnico para que los campesinos puedan tener mejores cosechas en los próximos años”, añadió.

    Atención inmediata
    Los municipios priorizados por la emergencia son Catarina, Ayutla, Malacatán, Pajapita, Ocós, La Blanca, Concepción Tutuapa, Ixchiguán, Sibinal, Comitancillo y San José Ojetenam.
    La vicepresidenta Roxana Baldetti se reunió la semana pasada con los gobernadores departamentales, a quienes pidió que agilicen las acciones para atender el problema causado por la sequía.


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