Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

ReliefWeb - Updates

older | 1 | .... | 188 | 189 | (Page 190) | 191 | 192 | .... | 728 | newer

    0 0

    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Mali
    preview


    Early harvests mark the end of the lean season in agropastoral areas

    • With the exception of a few isolated incidents, the securitization of northern Mali has allowed for the reestablishment of near-normal movements of people and goods. IDPs and refugees are actively returning to their homes with the help of the government and the humanitarian community in the form of transportation services, as well as food and nonfood assistance.

    • Harvests are expected to be average, which should ensure adequate staple food supplies on both northern and southern markets. In addition to good market supplies in northern areas, harvests of wild fonio and certain early-maturing crops are bolstering household food availability.

    • Cereal market prices are seasonally declining due to ongoing harvests and are expected to continue to fall through December/January. Good livestock prices are also strengthening incomes for pastoral households who are taking advantage of good terms of trade to rebuild their cereal stocks.

    • The availability of early crops in millet-producing areas and the improvement in terms of trade for pastoralists by more than 30 percent are helping to ease Stressed (IPC Phase 2) food security conditions that have been observed in northern areas since July. In addition to the availability of fresh millet crops in October, rice harvests between November and January will enable households to meet their food needs. The combination of these factors, plus continuing humanitarian food assistance through December and the arrival of crops from southern surplus-production areas that are selling at near-average prices, will cause households to face Minimal (IPC Phase 1) food insecurity throughout the outlook period.


    0 0

    Source: ECOWAS
    Country: Mali

    24 November 2013 [Bamako -Mali]

    Mali’s Prime Minister Oumar Tatam Ly has expressed his country’s profound gratitude to ECOWAS for its solidarity and contributions that facilitated the resolution of Malian crises and restoration of national unity and constitutional order.

    Receiving in audience in his office on Friday 22nd November 2013, Prof. Amos Sawyer, Head of ECOWAS Election Observation Mission to Mali’s Sunday legislative poll, the Prime Minister mentioned in particular the laudable efforts by the President of the ECOWAS Commission, His Excellency Kadre Desire Ouedraogo and his management team in advancing the regional integration agenda.

    He noted that ECOWAS support had encouraged Mali to build on the momentum of its recent successful presidential polls by taking on the challenges of organizing the parliamentary elections in the aftermath of the country’s political and security crises.

    According to the Prime Minister, the presence of the regional observers will not only boost the credibility of the elections, but also reassure the local population and the international community on the prevailing peace and security in Mali.

    Prof. Sawyer, who met the Prime Minister as part of his consultations with political stakeholders ahead of Sunday’s poll, briefed the Malian leader on the role of the 100-strong regional observation team and their neutrality in process to conclude the country’s political transition being facilitated by ECOWAS.

    Recalling the key role played by ECOWAS in ending the 14-year bloody civil war in his own country, Liberia, with Mali as part of that process, Prof. Sawyer said this formed the basis for the involvement of ECOWAS and its Member States in helping Mali in its period of need.

    “When your neighbour’s house is on fire you have to help put it out,” the head of ECOWAS Mission said, adding that it has become “an obligation for ECOWAS to help Malian brothers and sisters” out of crises.

    Prof. Sawyer also met with the Malian Minister for Territorial Administration Mousa Sinko Coulibaly, the Chairman of the Independent National Electoral Commission, CENI, Mr. Mamadou Diamoutani and other officials of the Commission, as well as the Delegate General for elections in Mali, Gen. Siaka Sangare.

    The head of ECOWAS observer mission, who was accompanied on the courtesy visits and discussions by Ambassador Aboudou Toure Cheaka, President of ECOWAS Commission’s Special Representative to Mali, the Director of Cabinet in the President’s Office, Mr. Denis Ouedraogo and the Commission’s Director of Political Affairs, Dr. Abdel-Fatau Musah, also met with heads of other observer missions.

    Speaking shortly on his arrival in Bamako on Thursday, Prof. Sawyer appealed for peaceful parliamentary polls in Mali to consolidate the progress made towards the restoration of constitutional order and the country’s territorial integrity.

    He also called on Malians to turn out massively to elect members of the147-seat National Assembly from the more than 1,100 contending candidates.

    More than 6.5million registered Malian voters from the country’s estimated 16.5million population will cast their ballots in more than 20,000 polling centres on Sunday.

    ECOWAS observers are being deployed to the country’s eight regions and the municipalities of Bamako, the nation’s capital.


    0 0

    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, Chad, Gambia, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal
    preview


    FEWS NET’s Food Security Outlook reports for the Sahel and West Africa for October 2013 to March 2014 are based on the following regional assumptions developed at the beginning of October 2013:

    SEASONAL PERFORMANCE

    End-of-season/Agro-climatic conditions

    The Intertropical Front (ITF) has been retreating southwards, towards the Equator, since September in line with normal seasonal trends (Figure 1). Based on its mean position during the last dekad of September, all end-of-season forecasts are predicting the following:

    • In the Sahelian zone, the rainy season generally finished up at the end of September, although sporadic storms may allow crops in localized areas to finish maturing. In many areas within the zone, planting delays were observed earlier in the season and as a result, crops are at unusually early stages of development. This could lead to localized declines in crop yields compared to average, particularly in the far northern reaches of Burkina Faso, Niger (localized areas of the Diffa, Tillaberi, and Tahoua regions), northeastern and west-central Nigeria, Mali (localized areas in central Mali and in western Kayes), Chad (the Sahel and western Chari Baguirmi), south-central Mauritania, and north-central Senegal and Gambia.

    • In the Sudano-Guinean zone and bimodal areas, the rainy season will continue into November (for the Sudano-Guinean zone) and into December (for bimodal areas), with a normal increase in storm activity during the month of October as the ITF retreats southwards. This will allow standing crops in the Sudano-Guinean zone to finish maturing normally and will help get the second growing season (October to December) in bimodal areas off to a good start.


    0 0

    Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
    Country: Malawi
    preview


    FOOD SECURITY SNAPSHOT

    • Planting of the 2014 cereal crop is underway

    • Maize production in 2013 is estimated at a similar level to the 2012 harvest

    • Generally firm maize prices in October 2013 following strong gains in the preceding months

    • Approximately 1.46 million people are estimated to be food insecure, due to poor harvests and persistent high food prices


    0 0

    Source: IRIN
    Country: Mali

    GAO/BAMAKO, 25 novembre 2013 (IRIN) - Onze mois après que les forces françaises chassé les militants islamistes du nord du Mali, la crise humanitaire perdure dans la région. Les niveaux de faim sont plus élevés qu'en 2012 et la malnutrition a atteint un taux alarmant dans la ville de Gao, à Bourem et à Ansongo. Dans le Nord, les actes de banditisme entravent l'accès des éleveurs aux pâturages, et l'insécurité empêche certaines organisations d'aide humanitaire d'atteindre les populations isolées et dans le besoin.

    « Le Mali n'a jamais connu de période aussi difficile. La situation est explosive dans les zones [de Kidal] qui étaient contrôlées par les rebelles. Un demi-million de personnes ont été déplacées pendant le conflit ; 200 000 enfants souffrent de malnutrition aigüe ; 1,3 million de personnes vivent dans l'insécurité alimentaire et sont dépendantes des distributions de nourriture », a dit à IRIN David Gressly, Représentant spécial adjoint de la Mission multidimensionnelle intégrée des Nations Unies pour la stabilisation au Mali (MINUSMA), depuis la capitale, Bamako.

    Les zones d'insécurité sont le massif des Ifoghas, situé dans la région de Kidal ; Tessalit, ville localisée à l'est de Tombouctou, non loin de la frontière mauritanienne ; et les environs de la ville de Ménaka, dans la région de Gao, non loin de la frontière algérienne, ont indiqué M. Gressly et le Bureau de la coordination des affaires humanitaires des Nations Unies (OCHA).

    Fernando Arroyo, chef du bureau d'OCHA au Mali, a dit à IRIN : « Il est difficile de se déplacer à l'extérieur des centres urbains, pas seulement à Kidal, mais aussi à Tombouctou, à Gao et autour de Mopti, dans les zones anciennement occupées. Nous n'avons pas ou peu d'accès aux villes comme Tessalit ».

    La faim

    D'après une évaluation de la sécurité alimentaire menée en juillet 2013 par le gouvernement, le Programme alimentaire mondial (PAM) et l'Organisation des Nations Unies pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture (FAO), trois ménages sur quatre sont dépendants de l'aide alimentaire pour assurer leur survie à Gao, à Tombouctou, à Kidal et dans les zones anciennement occupées de la région de Mopti. La moitié de la population de ces régions a déjà vendu ou hypothéqué des biens essentiels, ce qui menace encore plus la sécurité alimentaire. Certaines familles consacrent jusqu'à 90 pour cent de leurs revenus à l'achat de nourriture, a indiqué Alexandre Brecher, porte-parole du PAM au Mali.

    Alors que les personnes déplacées à l'intérieur de leur propre pays (PDIP) reviennent dans le Nord, 1,5 million de personnes pourraient être confrontées à la faim dans la région en 2014, conclut l'évaluation.

    Selon l'enquête de suivi et d'évaluation normalisés des phases de secours et de transition (enquête SMART) qui a été réalisée en mai par le Fonds des Nations Unies pour l'enfance (UNICEF) et ses partenaires, les taux globaux de malnutrition aigüe ont atteint 13,5 pour cent à Gao et jusqu'à 17 pour cent dans le district de Bourem.

    Action contre la faim, le gouvernement, l'Office d'aide humanitaire de la commission européenne (ECHO) et l'UNICEF répondent aux besoins des enfants malnutris à l'hôpital régional de Gao et dans les dispensaires locaux de Gao et Bourem. Aucune enquête SMART n'a pour l'instant été menée à Tombouctou ou à Kidal en raison de problèmes de sécurité, a indiqué l'UNICEF.

    La saison maigre annuelle touche à sa fin au Mali, mais les retombées de la sécheresse de 2011-2012 et les perturbations liées au conflit - y compris les déplacements de masse - ont rendu plus difficile l'accès à la nourriture dans le Nord. Si quelques agriculteurs sont revenus dans la région pour récolter leurs cultures pendant la saison des pluies, beaucoup ne l'ont pas fait, a dit Wanalher Ag Alwaly, de l'organisation non gouvernementale (ONG) Tassaght de Gao.

    La fuite des commerçants arabes de Gao et de Tombouctou vers les pays voisins et la fermeture de la frontière algérienne - une plaque tournante commerciale - ont perturbé les échanges. La semaine dernière, le gouvernement algérien a indiqué qu'il ouvrira la frontière pour des périodes de temps limitées.

    La route entre Gao et Kidal « n'est pas encore sûre », a dit Soumeila Cissé, un chauffeur de camion de Gao. « Il est fréquent que des bandits arrêtent les voitures appartenant à des particuliers et volent les marchandises transportées dans les camions. C'est pour cette raison que nous n'avons pas pu transporter les marchandises vers les villages situés au nord de Gao », a-t-il dit à IRIN. Certaines compagnies de transport basées à Gao ont mis un terme au transport de marchandises dans toute la région du nord du pays, a-t-il dit.

    Cependant, au Sud, les conditions de route sont presque revenues à la normale sur la route de Gao à Niamey (Niger).

    Dans les régions de Bourem et de Gao, où la culture principale est le riz, l'ensemencement a été différé à cause des précipitations tardives et des crues de la rivière Niger, qui ont empêché les agriculteurs d'accéder à leurs champs. Cette année, les perspectives de récolte ne sont pas prometteuses à Gao et à Bourem, a dit Christian Munezero, responsable du programme humanitaire d'Oxfam à Gao.

    « L'année dernière, à cette époque, la grange était presque pleine de millet », a dit Aishatoun Touré, un agriculteur de la région de Gao. « Cette année, nous avons déjà utilisé toutes nos réserves et nous n'aurons pas de millet avant la prochaine récolte. Les mois à venir vont être très difficiles ».

    Les responsables de certaines communautés ont contacté Oxfam, car elles ont désespérément besoin d'aide.

    « Si l'on n'accroit pas le volume actuel de l'aide, nous allons nous retrouver dans une situation plus difficile que lors de la crise alimentaire de 2012 », a dit Mohamed Coulibaly, directeur pays d'Oxfam.

    L'organisation réalise actuellement une évaluation des besoins d'urgence dans les zones de Gao où elle intervient.

    Le brigandage entrave l'accès aux pâturages

    Moussa Ag Bilal, un éleveur de Forgho, petit village situé à 25 km de Gao, a dit à IRIN que bon nombre d'éleveurs ont trop peur des attaques des bandits pour s'aventurer à plus de 10 km de leur village. Les éleveurs sont donc regroupés sur une petite superficie et les pâturages commencent à manquer.

    « Il y a de moins en moins de pâturages et les éleveurs sont parfois obligés de traverser des pâturages qui appartiennent à d'autres groupes d'éleveurs. Étant donné le manque de précipitations, le niveau d'eau des puits et des rivières est insuffisant. Dans certains endroits, l'accès à l'eau devient vraiment problématique », a-t-il dit à IRIN.

    Si les organisations ont réhabilité 70 pour cent des points d'eau destinés aux animaux le long des circuits de pâturage traditionnels dans la région de Gao, ainsi que 50 pour cent de ceux de Bourem, le manque de ressources humaines et de pièces de rechange en complique l'entretien, selon Oxfam.

    « Je crains que la situation ne devienne critique, que les pâturages et l'eau soient de plus en plus rares et viennent à manquer dans les semaines à venir », a dit à IRIN M. Ag Awaly, de Tassaght.

    Les services de base

    La capacité du gouvernement à trouver des solutions à certains de ces problèmes reste très limitée, ont dit des responsables de l'aide, bien que de nombreuses améliorations aient été apportées aux services publics. Une grande partie des systèmes d'eau et d'électricité ont été remis en état à Gao et Tombouctou, par exemple.

    Le Mali a attiré les fonctionnaires dans le Nord avec des incitations financières dont le montant peut atteindre 400 dollars, mais beaucoup d'entre eux n'ont pas encore fait le pas, ce qui veut dire que les bureaux du gouvernement régional ne fonctionnent que partiellement. Bon nombre d'hôpitaux, d'écoles et de services sociaux de base ne sont pas entièrement opérationnels. La population a donc toujours besoin de l'aide des organisations humanitaires sur le terrain.

    À Gao et à Tombouctou, 480 écoles ont rouvert leurs portes, mais elles manquent de matériel, de livres et de bureaux, et bon nombre d'écoles n'ont pas suffisamment de personnel. Les écoles de Kidal sont toujours fermées.

    Les principaux hôpitaux fonctionnent grâce à l'aide de partenaires, tandis que de nombreux dispensaires sont maintenant ouverts - 80 pour cent de ceux de Tombouctou, 94 pour cent de ceux de Gao et 66 pour cent de ceux de Kidal - mais plusieurs d'entre eux manquent de personnel et d'équipements, selon Claude Dunn, Coordinateur d'urgence de l'UNICEF au Mali.

    Le secteur des soins de santé rencontre des problèmes à Kidal, a dit son maire, Arabcane Ag Abzayack. « Dans la ville de Kidal, le CICR [Le Comité international de la Croix-Rouge] et les ONG locales fournissent des soins de santé. Les personnes qui vivent dans le désert et dans les villages éloignés de Kidal doivent encore se rendre à Tamanarasset et à Tin Zaouatine, dans le sud de l'Algérie, pour recevoir des soins médicaux ».

    L'accès

    Si certaines organisations d'aide humanitaire, comme le CICR, ont réussi à négocier un accès humanitaire dans les trois régions du Nord, d'autres organisations indiquent qu'elles ont un accès limité.

    Attaher Maiga, un membre du personnel du CICR, a dit que cette organisation est le seul groupe humanitaire présent dans les onze communes de Kidal.

    « Nous intervenons partout. Nous sommes présents dans toutes les communes depuis que le Nord a été libéré [en janvier]. Pendant l'occupation, nous avons travaillé avec les responsables locaux pour obtenir un accès humanitaire à Gao et à Kidal. Nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec les forces maliennes et la MINUSMA ; nous les informons de nos déplacements dans les zones sensibles autour d'Ansongo et Ménaka et à [l'ouest] de Tombouctou, non loin de la frontière avec la Mauritanie », a-t-il dit.

    L'organisation Oxfam a indiqué qu'elle avait accès à la région de Gao et qu'elle suivait en permanence la situation pour évaluer les risques sécuritaires. MSF intervient à Tombouctou et à Gao, où l'organisation dispose de personnel, mais pas dans la région de Kidal. L'UNICEF mène des actions à Gao et à Tombouctou, mais pas à Kidal non plus, tandis que le PAM achemine de la nourriture à Kidal par le biais du CICR et de ses partenaires locaux.

    Les agences des Nations Unies n'utiliseront des escortes militaires qu'en « dernier recours », a dit M. Gressly. « C'est un environnement explosif. Nous nous efforçons d'améliorer l'accès humanitaire dans les zones reculées sans dépendre de l'armée », a-t-il dit à IRIN.

    kh/aj/rz-mg/ld

    [FIN]


    0 0

    Source: African Union
    Country: Mali

    Addis Abéba, le 19 novembre 2013 – La Présidente de la Commission de l’Union africaine (UA), le Dr Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma a décidé de déployer une mission d'observation au Mali dans le cadre des élections législatives qui auront lieu le 24 novembre courant. La mission d’observation de l’UA est conduite par M. Dileita Mohamed Dileita, ancien Premier Ministre de Djibouti.

    La Mission de l’Union africaine est composée de 50 observateurs de court terme, parmis lesquels des observateurs des droits de l’homme de la Mission de l’Union africaine pour le Mali et le Sahel (MISAHEL) déployés sur le territoire du Mali depuis le mois de juillet 2013. Elle sera déployée à travers le pays à partir du 22 novembre. La mission de l’UA est composée de parlementaires panafricains, de responsables de Commissions électorales nationales indépendantes, de représentants des organisations de défense des droits de l’Homme ainsi que de la société civile africaine.

    Cette mission se déroulera conformément aux dispositions pertinentes de la Déclaration de Durban sur les principes régissant les élections démocratiques en Afrique, adoptée en juillet 2002, par les Chefs d'Etat et de gouvernement de l’Union africaine.

    La mission d’observation électorale de l’UA a établi son secrétariat à l’hôtel Radisson Blu de Bamako.

    Note aux rédacteurs :

    La Mission d’Observation de l’Union africaine a pour mandat d’observer les élections du 28 juillet 2013, conformément aux dispositions pertinentes de :
    - la Charte Africaine sur la Démocratie, les élections et la Gouvernance, entrée en vigueur le 15 février 2012, qui prône le raffermissement des processus électoraux en Afrique par le renforcement des institutions électorales et la conduite des élections dans des conditions de transparence, d’équité et d’indépendance ;
    - la Déclaration de l’OUA sur les principes régissant les élections démocratiques en Afrique adoptée en juillet 2002 par la Conférence des Chefs d’Etat et de Gouvernement ;
    - les Directives de l’Union Africaine pour les Missions d’observation et de suivi des élections ; - la constitution et des lois de la République Malienne.

    Contact :
    Mme Yaye Nabo SENE
    Mission d’observation électorale de l’Union africaine
    Radisson Hôtel
    Cellulaire : +223 75 94 12 70 (à partir du 20 novembre)
    E-mail : seney@africa-union.org ou epsilone10@gmail.com


    0 0

    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Mali

    11/25/2013 17:52 GMT

    Par Serge DANIEL

    BAMAKO, 25 novembre 2013 (AFP) - Le soulagement était de mise lundi au Mali au lendemain du premier tour des législatives qui n'a pas donné lieu aux attentats jihadistes tant redoutés mais a peu mobilisé les électeurs, contrairement à la présidentielle de cet été.

    Après la série d'attaques et attentats meurtriers commis ces dernières semaines dans le nord du pays, les forces armées françaises et maliennes, ainsi que celle de l'ONU, ont été sur les dents toute la journée de dimanche pour prévenir de nouveaux incidents.

    Mission accomplie, puisque les seuls incidents signalés ont été provoqués par des indépendantistes touareg qui ont empêché le vote de se tenir dans la localité de Talataye, à l'est de Gao, la plus grande ville du nord du Mali, et ont brisé les vitres de voiture à Kidal, fief des Touareg et de leur rébellion situé plus au nord. Une femme a été blessée par les éclats de verre.

    "Les fauteurs de troubles de dimanche seront recherchés et punis sur toute l'étendue du territoire national", a réagi le ministère malien de la Justice.

    En présentant lundi à Bamako la déclaration préliminaire de l'Union européenne (UE) sur le scrutin, Louis Michel, chef des observateurs européens, a salué "un nouveau succès" pour le Mali après la présidentielle remportée au second tour du 11 août par Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta.

    Selon M. Michel, "la journée du scrutin s'est déroulée paisiblement, en dépit des quelques incidents survenus dans le Nord, d'ampleur limitée, et qui ne sont pas de nature à remettre en cause la sincérité du vote".

    De retour de Bourem, au nord de Gao, où il s'était rendu dimanche, Bert Koenders, chef de la mission de l'ONU au Mali, la Minusma, a estimé que "le système des Nations unies au Mali a pleinement joué son rôle d'appui logistique et sécuritaire dans les trois régions et grandes villes du Nord, Gao, Tombouctou et Kidal".

    Face à la faible mobilisation constatée dimanche et "même si la nature d'une élection présidentielle est différente de celle d'une élection législative", M. Michel a exhorté "tous les acteurs de la vie politique à une mobilisation le 15 décembre", date du second tour. "Dans le contexte particulier du Mali, voter n'est pas seulement un droit, c'est un devoir moral", a-t-il estimé.

    Participation peut-être "inférieure à 30%"

    La centaine d'observateurs européens qui ont visité 789 bureaux de vote sur 17.983 dans cinq des huit régions du pays, ont évalué positivement les opérations électorales dans 97,6% d'entre eux.

    Le Pôle d'observation citoyenne électorale (POCE), rassemblement d'ONG qui avait déployé 3.700 observateurs dans tout le pays, a également estimé que "le vote s'est bien déroulé", constat partagé par les observateurs de la Communauté économique des Etats d'Afrique de l'Ouest (Cédéao) dont le Mali est membre.

    Le POCE a également souligné la faible participation qui pourrait être "inférieure à 30%", alors qu'elle avait atteint près de 50% à la présidentielle.

    De "premières tendances" sur les résultats du premier tour pourraient être connues dans la journée de lundi, selon le ministère de l'Administration territoriale, une des structures chargées de l'organisation des élections au Mali.

    Fort de la dynamique créée par son élection en août avec près de 80% des voix, le président Keïta espère "une confortable" majorité à l'Assemblée nationale pour son parti, le Rassemblement pour le Mali (RPM).

    Quant à son adversaire malheureux du second tour, Soumaïla Cissé, il espère devenir avec son parti, l'Union pour la République et la démocratie (URD), le chef de l'opposition parlementaire.

    Quelque 6,5 millions d'électeurs étaient appelés à voter pour ces législatives censées parachever le retour à l'ordre constitutionnel, interrompu par le coup d'Etat de mars 2012 qui avait précipité la chute du nord du Mali aux mains de groupes islamistes armés liés à Al-Qaïda.

    Plus de 10 mois après une intervention armée internationale initiée par la France en janvier 2013 pour les traquer, ces groupes conservent une capacité de nuisance et continuent d'y mener attaques et attentats. Depuis fin septembre, ils ont tué une dizaine de soldats maliens et tchadiens et des civils, dont deux journalistes français enlevés et tués le 2 novembre à Kidal.

    bur-stb/sd

    © 1994-2013 Agence France-Presse


    0 0

    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Central African Republic, Chad, Libya, Nigeria, Sudan
    preview


    SITUATION OVERVIEW

    Movements of populations continue to be a humanitarian issue to be addressed in Chad. Around 150,000 Chadian returnees from Libya have arrived since Libya Crisis in 2011, and sporadic arrivals continue in Faya-Largeau and areas of difficult humanitarian access in the northern mine-affected Tibesti region. Following tribal clashes in Darfur during the course of 2013, an influx of around 25,000 Sudanese refugees and 22,757 Chadian returnees have arrived at the border town of Tissi in the South East of the country. Political instability in the CAR has sent a new wave of about 12,000 refugees in the Chadian region of Gore and Moissala since January 2013 and 8,900 have been integrated into existing camps in southern Chad, bringing the total figure of CAR refugees to 67,435. Additionally, more than 1,000 Chadian returnees fleeing the CAR crisis have also arrived in Tissi. Claches between Nigerian Military and armed groups in northern Nigeria have caused an influx of about 3,500 returnees and 553 Nigerian refugees in the Lake Chad region. Some 90,000 former IDPs and 91,000 internal returnees, reintegrated and relocated are still in need for assistance.Despite good harvest during the 2012/2013 agricultural season, an increase of 54% of the five-year average, 2.3 million people remain food-insecure in Chad, including 1.2 million people at risk of extreme food insecurity


    0 0

    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Mali

    11/26/2013 00:43 GMT

    Par Serge DANIEL

    BAMAKO, 26 novembre 2013 (AFP) - Le soulagement était de mise lundi au Mali au lendemain du premier tour des législatives qui n'a pas donné lieu aux attentats jihadistes tant redoutés mais a peu mobilisé les électeurs, contrairement à la présidentielle de cet été.

    Après la série d'attaques et attentats meurtriers commis ces dernières semaines dans le nord du pays, les forces armées françaises et maliennes, ainsi que celle de l'ONU, ont été sur les dents toute la journée de dimanche pour prévenir de nouveaux incidents.

    Mission accomplie, puisque les seuls incidents signalés ont été provoqués par des indépendantistes touareg qui ont empêché le vote de se tenir dans la localité de Talataye, à l'est de Gao, la plus grande ville du nord du Mali, et ont brisé les vitres de voiture à Kidal, fief des Touareg et de leur rébellion situé plus au nord. Une femme a été blessée par les éclats de verre.

    "Les fauteurs de troubles de dimanche seront recherchés et punis sur toute l'étendue du territoire national", a réagi le ministère malien de la Justice.

    En présentant lundi à Bamako la déclaration préliminaire de l'Union européenne (UE) sur le scrutin, Louis Michel, chef des observateurs européens, a salué "un nouveau succès" pour le Mali après la présidentielle remportée au second tour du 11 août par Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta.

    Selon M. Michel, "la journée du scrutin s'est déroulée paisiblement, en dépit des quelques incidents survenus dans le Nord, d'ampleur limitée, et qui ne sont pas de nature à remettre en cause la sincérité du vote".

    De retour de Bourem, au nord de Gao, où il s'était rendu dimanche, Bert Koenders, chef de la mission de l'ONU au Mali, la Minusma, a estimé que "le système des Nations unies au Mali a pleinement joué son rôle d'appui logistique et sécuritaire dans les trois régions et grandes villes du Nord, Gao, Tombouctou et Kidal".

    Face à la faible mobilisation constatée dimanche et "même si la nature d'une élection présidentielle est différente de celle d'une élection législative", M. Michel a exhorté "tous les acteurs de la vie politique à une mobilisation le 15 décembre", date du second tour. "Dans le contexte particulier du Mali, voter n'est pas seulement un droit, c'est un devoir moral", a-t-il estimé.

    Participation peut-être "inférieure à 30%"

    Washington s'est également félicité du bon déroulement du scrutin. "Le Mali a fait un pas en avant important en organisant le premier tour de ses élections législatives", a loué le secrétaire d'Etat John Kerry dans un communiqué.

    La centaine d'observateurs européens qui ont visité 789 bureaux de vote sur 17.983 dans cinq des huit régions du pays, ont évalué positivement les opérations électorales dans 97,6% d'entre eux.

    Le Pôle d'observation citoyenne électorale (POCE), rassemblement d'ONG qui avait déployé 3.700 observateurs dans tout le pays, a également estimé que "le vote s'est bien déroulé", constat partagé par les observateurs de la Communauté économique des Etats d'Afrique de l'Ouest (Cédéao) dont le Mali est membre.

    Le POCE a également souligné la faible participation qui pourrait être "inférieure à 30%", alors qu'elle avait atteint près de 50% à la présidentielle.

    Fort de la dynamique créée par son élection en août avec près de 80% des voix, le président Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta espère "une confortable" majorité à l'Assemblée nationale pour son parti, le Rassemblement pour le Mali (RPM).

    Quant à son adversaire malheureux du second tour, Soumaïla Cissé, il espère devenir avec son parti, l'Union pour la République et la démocratie (URD), le chef de l'opposition parlementaire.

    Quelque 6,5 millions d'électeurs étaient appelés à voter pour ces législatives censées parachever le retour à l'ordre constitutionnel, interrompu par le coup d'Etat de mars 2012 qui avait précipité la chute du nord du Mali aux mains de groupes islamistes armés liés à Al-Qaïda.

    Plus de 10 mois après une intervention armée internationale initiée par la France en janvier 2013 pour les traquer, ces groupes conservent une capacité de nuisance et continuent d'y mener attaques et attentats. Depuis fin septembre, ils ont tué une dizaine de soldats maliens et tchadiens et des civils, dont deux journalistes français enlevés et tués le 2 novembre à Kidal.

    bur-stb/jr

    © 1994-2013 Agence France-Presse


    0 0

    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Mali

    11/26/2013 02:05 GMT

    by Serge Daniel

    BAMAKO, November 26, 2013 (AFP) - The United States and EU on Monday hailed the largely peaceful parliamentary elections in Mali with Washington urging the country to build on its democratic progress.

    Sunday's polls marked Mali's latest steps to recovery after the west African nation was plunged into chaos by a military coup in March last year, and finalised a process begun with the election of President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita in August.

    But voters were prevented from taking part by Tuareg separatist protesters in a northeastern town of around 14,000 people, while there were demonstrations in the northern rebel stronghold of Kidal and reports of ballot box thefts elsewhere.

    "Mali has taken an important step forward by holding the first round of legislative elections," said US Secretary of State John Kerry.

    "These elections speak volumes about the resilience of Mali's democratic tradition and the progress it has made over the past two years," he stressed.

    "We call on Mali's new government to build on these efforts in preparing for an anticipated second round of legislative elections on December 15, and we encourage the Malian people's peaceful and active participation in those polls," he added.

    Some 6.5 million Malians were eligible to vote for a new national assembly, with more than 1,000 candidates running for the 147 seats -- but turnout initially looked weak across the country and there were reports of thefts of ballot boxes in the north.

    The Citizen's Electoral Observation Deck, a monitoring programme put together by charities which deployed 3,700 observers, also said the vote went smoothly, but noted turnout could be "less than 30 percent".

    Earlier Monday the European Union said Mali's parliamentary polls had confounded fears over possible Islamist violence and were "another success" despite low-level protests in the north and a poor turnout.

    Louis Michel, head of the bloc's election observation mission, paid tribute to "the success of the organisation of elections, particularly with regard to the logistical, material and human conditions that prevailed during voting operations".

    Michel said the election "took place peacefully, despite some small-scale incidents in the north which are not likely to jeopardise the integrity of the vote".

    Meanwhile the Mali justice ministry said in statement that troublemakers would be "sought and punished throughout the national territory".

    One hundred EU observers visited 789 out of 17,983 polling stations, reporting that voting went well in almost all of them.

    This was despite fears that Al-Qaeda-linked militants driven from the towns and cities of northern Mali by a French-led military operation launched in January would use the election to launch violent reprisals.

    The ECOWAS bloc of 15 west African nations also noted a poor turnout, saying around a tenth of voters had cast their ballots by midday at two polling stations visited by observers in Bamako and that the rate had risen to just 16.5 percent by the close in another.

    Amos Sawyer, the head of ECOWAS's election observation mission, said however that Malians had displayed "orderly conduct" throughout the country.

    "The electoral process... has been orderly, security and the general atmosphere is fine and the preparation has been very good," he said.

    The ruling Rally for Mali (RPM) party has vowed to deliver "a comfortable majority" to smoothe the way for the reforms Keita plans to put in place to rebuild Mali's stagnant economy and soothe simmering ethnic tensions in the north.

    If results show no party is able to form a government, the second round vote will be held on December 15

    bur-stb/ft/pvh/mtp

    © 1994-2013 Agence France-Presse


    0 0

    Source: IRIN
    Country: Mali

    GAO/BAMAKO, 26 November 2013 (IRIN) - While security in some northern Mali towns has improved, continued sporadic attacks by militant groups in Timbuktu and Gao, as well as fighting between separatist Tuareg groups and Malian forces in Kidal, are still hampering some aid operations and keeping refugees from returning home.

    The most recent attacks took place on 21 November, when three rockets were fired by militants towards Gao town from 10km away, and on 20 November in Kidal, when a landmine injured three French soldiers just outside Kidal town.

    In Kidal, insecurity is worst in the northern Ifoghas Mountain region and around the town of Tessalit; in Gao Region, it is worst in the Menaka and Ansongo towns, close to the Niger border, according to UN peacekeeping mission in Mali (MINUSMA) Deputy Special Representative David Gressly.

    Insecurity in these areas has hampered aid deliveries, said Fernando Arroyo, head of the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) in Mali, which has offices in Gao and Timbuktu but not in Kidal. "Very few agencies have access to northern Kidal at the moment," Arroyo said.

    Access issues

    Humanitarian needs assessments have also been limited in Kidal, said aid agency staff, noting that UNICEF's May nutrition assessment, for instance, covered Gao but not Timbuktu or Kidal due to insecurity. Insecurity is also slowing down operations, as UN agencies wait for MINUSMA troops to secure or patrol areas before going in.

    But some agencies say they are continuing to work throughout the north's danger zones - unimpeded. Attaher Maiga, with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in Gao, said the ICRC continues to access all 11 of the region's "cercles", or districts. "There are no areas where we can't go," he told IRIN.

    ICRC works in the hospital in Kidal town and in health clinics around the region, among other activities.

    Yssoufou Salah, Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) head of mission in northern Mali, said, "So far there have been no areas we haven't been able to go."

    MSF works mainly in Timbuktu's regional hospital and recently opened a clinic close to the Mauritania border, though it also travels all over Timbuktu, as well as Gao, where it works in Goundam. "Our biggest worry is homemade bombs on the road. We have to be very careful and always consult with the Malians and MINUSMA before we go on a mission," he told IRIN.

    The last attack in Timbuktu took place in September, when four suicide bombers, driving a truck loaded with explosives, blew themselves up outside a Malian military camp, killing two civilians and six soldiers.

    Moulaye Sangaré, a doctor at the regional hospital in Gao town, said he worries that some vulnerable populations in rural areas are not being reached because many families are too fearful to leave their homes. "I'm afraid there are more malnourished children that are not being treated simply because their mothers can't bring them here to the hospital," he said.

    Some locals have expressed anger that more is not being done to secure rural areas and villages, where they say members and former members of militant groups continue to lurk.

    "We know that these people are out there. To feel safe we need the army to control who moves in and out of town," said Ousmane Maiga, member of a youth coalition in Gao. "The government has already agreed to negotiate with the rebels. The problem is they don't know who is MNLA [National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad], MUJAO [Movement for Oneness and Jihad in West Africa] or AQIM [Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb]. We do. When the negotiations start we would like to participate," he said.

    Residents of Gao town have become used to constant attacks, resident and radio journalist Amy Idrissa told IRIN. "The rebels have left Gao and are hiding in the bush not far from here, maybe only in the next village or across the river. They've been trying to get back into town since it was liberated," she said.

    Gao-based bus driver Soumeila Koné said he is nervous working in the area, but he has little choice. "The north is a violent no man's land where bandits and armed groups roam," he said.

    Kidal power struggle

    In Kidal, the security improvement expected to follow a June 2013 accord signed by the Malian government, the MNLA and the Arab Movement of Azawad (MAA) has not materialized.

    Amid the continued attacks, there has been confusion over who is in charge; French troops, MINUSMA forces and Tuareg rebels all control different parts of Gao town. But according to Kidal mayor Arbacane Ag Abzayack, "There's no doubt it's the Tuareg rebels who control Kidal."

    French troops with Operation Serval in Kidal focus on anti-jihadist operations, while MINUSMA and Malian troops are tasked with securing the town. Despite these efforts, two-thirds of adult residents carry a gun for protection, Ag Abzayack told IRIN from Bamako, where he was travelling. "Because there is no government, everyone does as they please."

    Malian soldiers were only allowed back into Kidal in July, because of fears of clashes between them and Tuareg rebel groups. Since then, they "haven't left camp a lot" said the mayor.

    Earlier this month, the MNLA, MAA and the High Council for the Unity of Azawad (HCUA) joined to form a united front in peace talks with the Bamako authorities, which are scheduled to start this month.

    In early November, when the MNLA/MAA/HCUA coalition handed over the keys to administrative buildings to MINSUMA in preparation for the Malian government to take them over, women and youths gathered in front of the governor's office, launching a protest in support of the rebels.

    "So far no government officials have returned, and no one knows who's in charge," he said.

    More troops needed

    While troops with France's Operation Serval, the Malian army and MINUSMA are all present in the north, there are not enough troops to secure the vast area, said experts.

    Some 1,800 of the remaining 2,000 French troops in Mali are deployed to the north - most of them to Gao, and the rest to Timbuktu, Kidal town and Tessalit.

    Following the murder of two French radio journalists in early November - which AQIM has claimed responsibility for - France reinforced its troop presence in Kidal to 350, according to its spokesperson, Hubert de Quievrecourt. But it is still scheduled to follow through with a drawdown to 1,000 troops following the legislative elections.

    This process was supposed to coincide with the build-up of the MINSUMA force to 12,600 troops - but thus far only 5,162 MINUSMA personnel are in Mali. Multiple reasons for the poor showing, include a drawdown of forces by Nigeria as it faces its own security crisis, and a reduced commitment by Chad following heavy troops casualties in combat in the north and mounting violence in Chad's neighbour, the Central African Republic.

    Some 2,675 MINUSMA troops are in Gao, Tessalit, Aguelhok, Kidal, Ménaka and Ansongo; 1,823 are stationed to secure Timbuktu, Gossi, Douentza, Sévaré, Goundam and Diabaly; and 664 are serving as military and police in Kidal.

    More military and police are expected to arrive soon from Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, China, the Netherlands and Rwanda, according to Quievrecourt.

    Amid this inadequate capacity, the Malian army is gradually building up its presence, while European Union trainers try to get troops fit for purpose. Thus far, it has boosted checkpoints and patrols outside of Timbuktu and Gao towns and increased its presence towards the Mauritania border and in Gourma-Rharous on the Niger border, where rebels kept a presence several months after the north was liberated, said its head in the north, Maj-Col Abdoulaye Coulibaly.

    The army continues to struggle in its fight against sleeper cells in towns and rural areas, said Coulibaly. The Timbuktu bombings and Gao rocket attacks, in his view, "had help from people inside and around Gao. They are the husbands, sons and brothers of Gao and Timbuktu citizens, and that's why we are asking the population to help us in chasing down these criminals."

    He added: "My main concern is not how many peacekeeping troops are on the ground but where they are deployed."

    Though some internally displaced people are voluntarily returning, unless security improves, few of the 140,000 or so Malian refugees in neighbouring countries are likely to return, said Coulibaly.

    Among Timbuktu residents living as refugees in Mauritania's Mbera camp, distrust is pervasive. Few had imminent plans to return. Mohammed Ag Adnana, a Tuareg from Timbuktu, told IRIN he did not trust any of the troops in place. "If you have light skin [if you are a Tuareg or Arab], they will attack you in the north," he said.

    Returns are a Catch-22, said Coulibaly: "Returns [of IDPs and refugees] as well as the reopening of clinics, schools and government institutions are all important to improve security and prevent the terrorists from taking back some areas."

    kh/aj/rz


    0 0

    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network, World Food Programme, Permanent Interstate Committee for Drought Control in the Sahel, Food and Agriculture Organization
    Country: Burkina Faso, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Senegal

    A good agro-pastoral production with localized risks of food and nutrition insecurity in the region

    The 2013-2014 agro-pastoral campaign was marked by a late start in several localities in the region. But, due to the effective return of rains in mid-July, the rains were abundant and even exceptional in some places, with a good distribution in time and space. Seasonal rainfall totals were generally higher than those of the 1971-2000 inter-annual average. The hydrological regime of the main rivers has been satisfactory with flood and dams filling levels favorable for irrigated and recessional agriculture in dry season.

    The installation of seedlings was effective in late July 2013 in the region, except in certain northern parts of the agricultural area of the Sahel, where delays of over 20 days were observed. The pest situation was generally calm. However, a locust outbreak was noted in northern Mauritania, which could pose a threat to the oasis crops and abundant pastures in the northern regions of Mauritania.

    The pastoral situation is relatively good with satisfactory animal health, water points relatively well filled and pasture available. However, forage deficits are locally observed in Niger, Chad, Mauritania, Senegal and Mali. The food situation of the herd may deteriorate earlier in these areas before the usual pastoral lean period.

    The projected cereal production in the Sahel and West Africa is 57, 462, 000 tons. It has increased of 16% compared to the last five-year average. The Sahel registers an average production of 19, 541, 000 tons (+1%) while the coastal zone records a more favorable situation with a total production of 37, 921, 000 tons, given an increase of 25% compared to the last 5-year average. Gross cereal production per capita is decreasing in the Sahel of about 13% compared to the average of the past five years, while it is increasing of 19% in the coastal zone.

    Rice (16, 181, 000 tons) is the crop that experienced the largest increase with more than 31% compared to the average, followed by maize (19, 239, 000 tons and 19% increase). On the other hand, millet production experienced a decrease of 17%.

    For other crops, compared to the last 5-year average, groundnut (5, 801, 000 tons) has an important increase of +25%, Cassava production is estimated at 82, 243, 000 tons (+24%), yam production amounts to 51, 825, 000 tons (+1%), cocoyam: 4, 901, 000 tons (-2%) and cowpea: 4, 852, 000 tons (+11%).

    The market supply level is generally satisfactory. The introduction of new crops helped to initiate the seasonal price declines in September in the region. However, prices are still high compared to the last 5-year average, particularly for millet and sorghum in the eastern and western basins. The prices of cash crops vary differently depending on the basin. Compared to the last 5-year average, the prices of groundnut are increasing and those of cowpea experience significant decrease in the west. In central and eastern basins, the trader’s interest for the cowpea contributes in maintaining prices above average. The terms of trade for livestock/cereal are favorable to breeders with livestock prices which are generally in increase in the region. Possible local degradations of terms of exchange are expected at the end of the first quarter of 2014, due to localized deficits of pastures.

    Regarding the nutritional status, although declines in the prevalence of global acute malnutrition are observed in Niger, Burkina Faso, Mali and Chad, the nutritional situation remains worrying in the Sahel and West Africa with pockets of nutritional emergencies identified following surveys conducted between June and August 2013. The moderate acute malnutrition affects 3.4 million children of under 5 years old and 1.1 million for the severe form. The nutritional situation could deteriorate as a result of the expected lower production in certain parts of Chad, Senegal, Mali and Niger combined with low purchasing power of households and social tensions in the region.

    The analysis of food and nutritional security with the Harmonized Framework tool, conducted in October and November 2013 in ten (10) countries in the region shows that many areas are still facing food stress with localized peaks despite ongoing harvests. This is, in general, the result of the combined effects of low stocks in poor households, of their limited food access and the prevalence of high acute malnutrition.

    The population estimates conducted in six (6) countries (Burkina Faso, Gambia, Niger, Senegal, Mauritania,
    Côte d’Ivoire), shows that 11, 300 million people are affected by food insecurity in all forms, among which 1,600 million are in need of immediate food assistance. To these will be added 1,725 million food insecure people in all its forms in Chad. In addition, the region has at November 12th, 2013, over 654, 000 refugees and more than 373, 000 internally displaced people.

    Given the foregoing, the meeting recommends that the States and their partners should:

    • Develop response plans to assist populations in food and nutrition insecurity;

    • Continue assistance in stress areas to strengthen the resilience of vulnerable populations;

    • Strengthen the monitoring of the nutritional status and the management of acute malnutrition;

    • Strengthen the desert locusts monitoring in Mauritania and in Mali;

    • Avoid any restriction on the functioning of markets to ensure adequate transfer of surpluses to deficit areas;

    • Strengthen the pastoral situation monitoring, bushfires control and facilitate trans-boundary transhumance;

    • Support dry season activities of irrigated and recessional agriculture for market gardening and food crops where possible;

    • Start collecting data for the next cycle of the Harmonized Framework in March 2014 for an update of the current situation.

    Dated at Lome, on 22 November 2013


    0 0

    Source: World Food Programme
    Country: Mali

    As displaced people and refugees start to voluntarily return to northern Mali, the World Food Programme is scaling up its operations to help rebuild livelihoods while also responding to immediate food and nutritional needs. Saouda Salihou, who returned to Gao with her young family, explains why this assistance is vital.

    GAO - Sitting in front of her straw hut, Saouda Salihou proudly watches her two-year-old son Souleymane as he plays with his ‘toy cars’ – two tin cans attached to a length of rope. The toddler mischievously teases his older brother as he plays. Salihou, 27, can hardly believe this joyful, healthy child is the same boy she brought to a health clinic just three weeks ago.

    During that visit to Gao’s health centre, Souleymane was diagnosed with moderate acute malnutrition. Nurses had weighed him and measured his mid-upper-arm circumference (MUAC) - a quick method to assess nutritional status.

    Salihou was given Plumpy’Sup, a ready-to-use nutritional supplement delivered to health centres in Gao by WFP, in partnership with Action Against Hunger.

    “After I started giving the product to my child, he quickly gained weight,” said Salihou. “The following week, I was amongst the first people to arrive at the health centre for my child’s medical appointment."

    These weekly appointments allow health agents to monitor vulnerable children’s nutritional status. Mothers also receive information on nutrition, and are given cooking demonstrations, using local products like peanuts, millet and maize.

    Salihou attended many of these cookery classes, but said she often did not have enough money to cook the nutritious meals she was shown.

    She is not alone. In northern Mali, three out of four households are food insecure and heavily reliant on food assistance, according to the results of a joint survey carried out by WFP and the government of Mali in September this year.

    Salihou returned to Gao in mid-October after spending around 18 months in the capital Bamako following her family’s flight from the conflict that gripped northern Mali. But her husband was unable to return to Gao with her as they could not afford the transport fees.

    He sends a little money to the family, and Salihou uses this to buy and resell condiments in Gao market. But the little she earns is never enough.

    This is why WFP’s school meals programme in Gao is so important. One of the reasons Salihou returned was to send her children to school in their home region.

    Her 10-year-old daughter Alima is now enrolled, and was delighted to rediscover her old friends in the classroom. She also enjoys a hot meal of enriched porridge every morning and another hot meal at midday.

    “I have struggled to feed my children since I returned and it’s a real relief for me that Alima is getting food at school. She is also very motivated to go to school,” said Salihou.

    WFP provides school meals to around 120,000 children in 576 schools in northern Mali. As more schools reopen, WFP is expanding this programme. WFP is also extending its malnutrition prevention and treatment in areas where health centres have started to function again.

    “WFP is scaling up its operations and requires more funding,” said Sally Haydock, WFP’s Representative in Mali.

    “The drought and subsequent food crisis in 2012, combined with the protracted security crisis have made it very difficult for the most vulnerable people to rebuild their lives. They will require food assistance throughout 2013 and into 2014,” she said.


    0 0

    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network, World Food Programme, Permanent Interstate Committee for Drought Control in the Sahel, Food and Agriculture Organization
    Country: Burkina Faso, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Senegal

    Une production agropastorale bonne avec des risques localisés d’insécurité alimentaire et nutritionnelle dans la région

    La campagne agropastorale 2013-2014 a été marquée par une installation tardive des pluies dans plusieurs localités de la région. Mais à partir de mi-juillet, les pluies ont été abondantes, voire exceptionnelles occasionnant des inondations par endroits. Les cumuls pluviométriques saisonniers ont été globalement supérieurs à ceux de la moyenne interannuelle 1981-2010. Le régime hydrologique des principaux cours d’eau a été satisfaisant avec des niveaux de crues et de remplissage des barrages favorables aux cultures de contre saison et de décrues.

    L’installation des semis a été effective en fin juillet 2013 dans la région, exceptées dans certaines localités du nord de la zone agricole du Sahel, où des retards de plus de 20 jours ont été relevés. La situation phytosanitaire a été globalement calme. Toutefois, il est noté une résurgence acridienne au nord de la Mauritanie, qui pourrait constituer une menace sur les cultures oasiennes et les pâturages abondants des régions du nord de la Mauritanie.

    La situation pastorale est globalement bonne avec une santé animale satisfaisante, des points d’eau relativement bien remplis et des pâturages disponibles. Cependant, des déficits fourragers sont localement observés au Niger, au Tchad, en Mauritanie, au Sénégal et au Mali. La situation alimentaire du cheptel risque de se détériorer précocement dans ces zones avant la période habituelle de soudure pastorale.

    La production céréalière prévisionnelle au Sahel et en Afrique de l’Ouest se chiffre à 57 462 000 tonnes. Elle est en hausse de 16% par rapport à la moyenne des cinq dernières années. Le Sahel accuse un niveau de production moyenne de 19 541 000 tonnes soit +1%. La zone côtière enregistre une situation plus favorable avec une production totale de 37 921 000 tonnes en hausse de 25%. La production brute de céréales par habitant est en baisse dans le Sahel de 13% par rapport à la moyenne des cinq dernières années, tandis qu’elle est en hausse de 19% dans la zone côtière.

    La production de riz estimée à 16 181 000 tonnes a connu la plus grande hausse avec plus de 31% par rapport à la moyenne, suivie de celle du maïs avec 19 239 000 tonnes en hausse de 19%. Par contre, la production de mil connait une baisse de 17%.

    Parmi les autres cultures, l’arachide avec 5 801 000 tonnes a subi une hausse importante de 25% comparé à la moyenne des cinq dernières années. La production du manioc est estimée à 82 243 000 tonnes (+24%), celle de l’igname à 51 825 000 tonnes (+1%), le taro à 4 901 000 tonnes (-2%) et le niébé à 4 852 000 tonnes (+11%).

    Le niveau d’approvisionnement des marchés est globalement satisfaisant. L’apparition des nouvelles récoltes a permis d’amorcer les baisses saisonnières des prix dès septembre dans la région. Cependant, les prixrestent encore élevés par rapport à la moyenne des 5 ans, particulièrement pour le mil et le sorgho dans les bassins Est et Ouest. Les prix des produits de rente varient différemment selon les bassins de productions. Par rapport à la moyenne des cinq dernières années, les prix de l’arachide sont en hausse et ceux du niébé en baisse à l’Ouest. Dans les bassins Centre et Est, on note un intérêt des commerçants autour du niébé, ce qui a maintenu les prix au-dessus de la moyenne. Les termes de l’échange bétail/céréales sont favorables aux éleveurs avec des prix des animaux qui sont dans l’ensemble à la hausse dans la région. De possibles dégradations locales des termes de l’échange sont prévisibles à la fin du premier trimestre de 2014, suite à des insuffisances localisées de pâturages.

    Concernant la situation nutritionnelle, des baisses de la prévalence de la malnutrition aiguë globale sont observées au Niger, au Burkina Faso, au Mali et au Tchad. Cependant, la situation reste préoccupante au Sahel et en Afrique de l’Ouest avec des poches en urgences nutritionnelles constatées suite aux enquêtes conduites entre juin et août 2013. La malnutrition aiguë modérée touche 3,4 millions d’enfants de moins de 5 ans et 1,1 millions pour la forme sévère. La situation nutritionnelle pourrait connaitre une détérioration suite aux baisses de production attendues dans certaines localités de la Gambie, du Mali, de la Mauritanie, du Niger, du Sénégal et du Tchad, combinées au faible pouvoir d’achat des ménages et aux tensions sociales dans la région.

    L’analyse de la sécurité alimentaire et nutritionnelle avec l’outil Cadre Harmonisé, réalisée en octobre et novembre 2013 dans dix pays de la région, montre que plusieurs zones sont en situation de stress alimentaire avec des pointes de crise localisée malgré les récoltes en cours. Cela découle, en général, des effets conjugués de la faiblesse des stocks chez les ménages pauvres, de leur accès alimentaire limité et de la malnutrition aigüe élevée.

    L’estimation des populations, effectuée dans 6 pays (Burkina Faso, Gambie, Niger, Sénégal, Mauritanie, Côte d’Ivoire), fait ressortir 11 300 000 personnes affectées par l’insécurité alimentaire sous toutes ses formes, dont 1 600 000 nécessitant une assistance alimentaire immédiate. A ceux-là, s’ajoutent 1 725 000 personnes en insécurité alimentaire sous toutes ses formes au Tchad. La région compte en plus, au 12 novembre 2013, plus de 654 000 réfugiés et plus de 373 000 déplacés internes.
    Compte tenu de tout ce qui précède, la réunion recommande aux Etats et à leurs partenaires de :

    • Etablir des plans de réponse pour venir en aide aux populations en insécurité alimentaire et nutritionnelle et des victimes d’inondations ;
    • Poursuivre l’assistance dans les zones en stress pour renforcer la résilience des populations vulnérables ;
    • Renforcer la surveillance nutritionnelle et la prise en charge de la malnutrition aigüe ;
    • Renforcer la surveillance du criquet pèlerin en Mauritanie et au Mali ;
    • Eviter toute restriction au bon fonctionnement des marchés pour assurer la libre circulation des surplus vers les zones déficitaires ;
    • Renforcer le suivi de la situation pastorale, lutter contre les feux de brousse et faciliter la transhumance transfrontalière ;
    • Appuyer les activités de contre-saison maraichères et vivrières là où c’est possible ;
    • Engager une collecte des données pour le prochain cycle du cadre harmonisé en mars 2014 en vue d’une mise à jour de la présente situation.

    Fait à Lomé, le 22 novembre 2013


    0 0

    Source: Assessment Capacities Project
    Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Lebanon, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen, Zimbabwe, South Sudan (Republic of)
    preview


    In Syria, government forces fully control the town of Qara after almost a week of heavy fighting which caused over 15,000 Syrian refugees to cross into Lebanon. Meanwhile, the UN stated that it has brokered an agreement allowing for the Government of Syria and opposition negotiators to meet for peace talks in Geneva on January 22. The opposition reaffirmed the conditions of its participation: the release of prisoners, humanitarian assistance for besieged towns, and the exclusion of President Assad from the new transitional government.

    In the Philippines, an estimated 13.17 million people have been affected by Typhoon Haiyan to date, according to OCHA. The number of displaced has been reduced to 3.43 million people, but people continue to move from the worst affected areas in search of aid and shelter. The death toll currently stands at 5,235 people, with another 1,613 still reported as missing.

    In the Democratic Republic of Congo, clashes between government forces and a group of insurgents in Province Orientale have displaced 200,000 people between August and November. Sporadic violence has been recorded in the east of the province over the last three months and has reportedly affected up to 300,000 people so far.

    Last Updated: 26/11/2013 Next Update: 03/12/2013

    Global Emergency Overview web interface


    0 0

    Source: Assessment Capacities Project
    Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Lebanon, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen, Zimbabwe, South Sudan (Republic of)
    preview


    In Syria, government forces fully control the town of Qara after almost a week of heavy fighting which caused over 15,000 Syrian refugees to cross into Lebanon. Meanwhile, the UN stated that it has brokered an agreement allowing for the Government of Syria and opposition negotiators to meet for peace talks in Geneva on January 22. The opposition reaffirmed the conditions of its participation: the release of prisoners, humanitarian assistance for besieged towns, and the exclusion of President Assad from the new transitional government.

    In the Philippines, an estimated 13.17 million people have been affected by Typhoon Haiyan to date, according to OCHA. The number of displaced has been reduced to 3.43 million people, but people continue to move from the worst affected areas in search of aid and shelter. The death toll currently stands at 5,235 people, with another 1,613 still reported as missing.

    In the Democratic Republic of Congo, clashes between government forces and a group of insurgents in Province Orientale have displaced 200,000 people between August and November. Sporadic violence has been recorded in the east of the province over the last three months and has reportedly affected up to 300,000 people so far.

    Last Updated: 26/11/2013 Next Update: 03/12/2013

    Global Emergency Overview web interface


    0 0

    Source: ECOWAS
    Country: Mali
    preview


    N°: 335/2013

    26 novembre 2013 [Bamako - Mali]

    Les élections législatives maliennes du dimanche 24 novembre 2013 se sont déroulées dans des «conditions acceptables de liberté et de transparence», a estimé la mission d’observation électorale de la CEDEAO, conduite par l’ancien président du gouvernement d’union nationale du Libéria, Pr Amos Sawyer.

    Dans sa déclaration préliminaire rendue publique lundi à Bamako, cette mission forte de 100 membres souligne que «les lacunes observées n'affectent pas de manière significative la crédibilité du scrutin, qui s’est tenu en conformité avec les normes acceptables à l'échelle mondiale».

    «Bien qu’involontaires, l'exclusion de certains jeunes et de quelques électeurs dans le Nord en proie à l’insécurité, ainsi que la faible affluence dans les bureaux de vote sont regrettables», ajoute la mission dans une déclaration de quatre pages comprenant 17 points, lue par un membre du Conseil des sages de la CEDEAO, Léopold Ouédraogo.

    Une autre insuffisance décelée par la mission a eu trait à l’Insuffisante de la sensibilisation des électeurs sur la délocalisation de certains centres de vote depuis l'élection présidentielle de juillet/août 2013, en particulier dans les régions de Gao et Tombouctou (nord).

    L’affichage tardif des listes électorales dans plusieurs centres à travers le pays a entraîné des difficultés à identifier les bureaux de vote, tandis que la faible représentation des femmes, qui constituaient seulement 14% des 1.140 candidats, constituent aussi des limites, tout comme ce «cas isolé d’enlèvement d'urnes» dans la région septentrionale de Kidal.

    Toutefois, la mission constate que le processus électoral et le comportement des acteurs le jour du scrutin ont révélé «une nette amélioration» par rapport à l’élection présidentielle de juillet/août, à travers notamment la ponctualité des agents électoraux, la livraison anticipée de l’essentiel du matériel électoral et le comportement correct des électeurs.

    En prévision du second tour de ces législatives, qui aura lieu dans quelques semaines, la mission a exhorté les organes pertinents de gestion électorale à assurer une sensibilisation adéquate des électeurs et à anticiper l’affichage des listes électorales dans les bureaux de vote.

    Tout en se félicitant de l'intensification de la lutte contre le terrorisme et de la sécurisation des opérations dans le nord du pays, la Mission d’observation électorale de la CEDEAO au Mali exhorte les forces alliées à «maintenir l'élan afin d'améliorer la sécurité, notamment à Gao, Kidal et Tessalit».

    Elle «encourage les partis politiques à redoubler d'efforts pour renforcer leur implantation, assurer une plus grande démocratie interne en leur sein et entreprendre des actions positives en faveur des femmes et des jeunes pour accroître leur compétitivité et leur représentativité dans les instances de prise de décisions de l'Etat, notamment au niveau des Assemblées nationale et communales».

    La mission de la CEDEAO adresse ses vives félicitations aux partis politiques, aux candidats et à l’électorat maliens pour leur comportement pacifique lors du processus électoral, et les encourage à montrer la même maturité pendant les processus de centralisation et de proclamation des résultats. Elle leur a également enjoint de «chercher des solutions à n'importe quelle contestation uniquement par les voies légales».

    «La mission d’observation électorale est convaincue que l’issue des élections législatives dotera le Mali d’une autre plateforme légitime pour pérenniser les efforts de réconciliation et de reconstruction en cours», tout en réitérant l'engagement de la CEDEAO à accompagner le pays dans ces différents processus.

    Elle a également exprimé sa gratitude à la mission onusienne au Mali, à la Minusma, à l’opération française Serval et à l'ensemble de la communauté internationale pour leur soutien aux efforts des Maliens visant à stabiliser le climat politique, à assurer la sécurité et à rétablir l'ordre institutionnel dans le pays.

    Cependant, la mission d’observation de la CEDEAO a condamné cette recrudescence d’activités terroristes sporadiques notée récemment dans le Nord, et invité tous les groupes armés non étatiques à se soumettre au programme de désarmement et à adhérer au processus de dialogue et de réconciliation en cours.

    Plus de 6,5 millions d'électeurs maliens inscrits sur les listes électorales étaient appelés aux urnes dimanche afin d'élire les 147 députés de l’Assemblée nationale.

    Le déploiement de la mission d'observation de la CEDEAO s’inscrit dans le cadre des efforts visant à aider le Mali à conduire à terme l’application de la feuille de route de la transition facilitée par l’organisation sous-régionale pour le rétablissement total de l'ordre constitutionnel et le recouvrement de l'intégrité territoriale du pays, après le coup d’Etat militaire et l’insurrection des mouvements séparatistes du Nord de l’année dernière.


    0 0

    Source: IRIN
    Country: Mali

    GAO/BAMAKO, 27 novembre 2013 (IRIN) - Si la sécurité dans certaines villes du nord du Mali s'est améliorée, la persistance des attaques sporadiques par des groupes extrémistes à Tombouctou et Gao, ainsi que des combats entre des groupes séparatistes touaregs et les forces maliennes dans la région de Kidal, continue de freiner les opérations d'aide et d'empêcher les réfugiés de rentrer chez eux.

    Les attaques les plus récentes ont eu lieu le 21 novembre, lorsque trois roquettes ont été tirées par des extrémistes vers la ville de Gao à 10km et le 20 novembre, dans la région de Kidal, lorsque trois soldats français ont été blessés par l'explosion d'une mine tout près de la ville de Kidal.

    Dans cette région, l'insécurité est extrême dans le massif de l'Adrar des Ifoghas, au nord-est du pays, et autour de la ville de Tessalit. Dans la région de Gao, c'est dans les villes de Menaka et d'Ansongo, près de la frontière avec le Niger, que l'insécurité sévit le plus, selon David Gressly, Représentant spécial adjoint de la Mission multidimensionnelle intégrée des Nations Unies pour la stabilisation au Mali (MINUSMA).

    L'insécurité qui règne dans ces régions a entravé l'acheminement de l'aide humanitaire, a déclaré Fernando Arroyo, chef du Bureau de la coordination des affaires humanitaires des Nations Unies (OCHA) au Mali (qui dispose de bureaux à Gao et Tombouctou, mais pas à Kidal). « En ce moment, très peu d'organisations ont accès au nord de Kidal, » a-t-il dit.

    Difficultés d'accès

    Les évaluations visant à déterminer les besoins humanitaires sont également limitées à Kidal, d'après les employés des organisations humanitaires. Ils soulignent que l'évaluation d'UNICEF sur la nutrition datant du mois de mai, par exemple, couvre seulement Gao, mais pas Tombouctou, ni Kidal en raison de l'insécurité qui y règne. L'insécurité ralentit aussi les opérations, puisque les agences des Nations Unies attendent que les troupes de la MINUSMA sécurisent ou patrouillent ces zones avant de pouvoir s'y rendre.

    Cependant, certaines organisations affirment qu'elles continuent à travailler sans encombre dans les zones dangereuses du Nord. Attaher Maiga, qui travaille pour le Comité international de la Croix-Rouge (CICR) à Gao, a déclaré que le CICR avait toujours accès à l'ensemble des 11 « cercles », ou districts, de la région. « Il n'y a pas de zones auxquelles nous n'avons pas accès », a-t-il déclaré à IRIN.

    Le CICR est notamment présent à l'hôpital de la ville de Kidal et dans les centres de soins de la région.

    Yssoufou Salah, chef de mission pour Médecins sans frontières (MSF) dans le nord du Mali, a déclaré : « Jusqu'à présent, il n'y a pas eu de zones dans lesquelles nous n'avons pas pu nous rendre. »

    L'organisation MSF est surtout active à l'hôpital régional de Tombouctou et a récemment ouvert une clinique près de la frontière avec la Mauritanie. Elle se déplace aussi dans la région de Tombouctou, dans la commune de Goundam, et autour de Gao. « Notre plus grande inquiétude, ce sont les bombes artisanales sur la route. Nous devons être très prudents et consulter systématiquement les Maliens et la MINUSMA avant de partir en mission, » a-t-il confié à IRIN.

    La dernière attaque à Tombouctou remonte à septembre : au volant d'un camion chargé d'explosifs, quatre kamikazes se sont fait exploser devant un camp militaire malien. Deux civils et six soldats ont été tués.

    Moulaye Sangaré, un médecin de l'hôpital régional de la ville de Gao, s'inquiète du fait que dans les zones rurales, certaines populations vulnérables ne bénéficient pas de l'aide humanitaire, car de nombreuses familles sont effrayées à l'idée de quitter leurs maisons. « J'ai bien peur qu'un grand nombre d'enfants mal nourris ne puissent être soignés simplement parce que leurs mères ne peuvent pas les emmener à l'hôpital, » a-t-il dit.

    Certains habitants ont exprimé leur colère au sujet des carences en termes de sécurité dans les zones rurales et les villages, où selon eux, les membres et les anciens membres des groupes extrémistes restent cachés.

    « Nous savons que ces gens sont là. Pour nous sentir en sécurité, l'armée doit contrôler les déplacements à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de la ville », a déclaré Ousmane Maiga, un membre d'une coalition de jeunes à Gao. « Le gouvernement a déjà accepté de négocier avec les rebelles. Le problème est le suivant : ils ne savent pas qui se cache derrière le MNLA [Mouvement national de libération de l'Azawad], le MUJAO [Mouvement pour l'unité et le Jihad en Afrique de l'Ouest] ou AQMI [al-Qaïda au Maghreb islamique]. En revanche, nous oui. Lorsque les négociations viendront à démarrer, nous souhaiterions y participer, » a-t-il déclaré.

    La journaliste radio Amy Idrissi a dit à IRIN que les habitants de la ville de Gao se sont habitués aux attaques incessantes. « Les rebelles ont quitté Gao et se cachent dans le bush non loin d'ici, peut-être même dans le village suivant ou de l'autre côté de la rivière. Ils ont essayé de revenir dans la ville depuis qu'elle a été libérée », a-t-elle dit.

    Soumeila Koné, chauffeur de bus à GAO, a avoué que travailler dans cette zone était source de stress pour lui, mais il n'a guère le choix. Selon lui, « le Nord est un no man's land violent où rôdent les bandits et les groupes armés ».

    Luttes de pouvoir à Kidal

    À Kidal, le renforcement de la sécurité qui avait été annoncé en juin 2013 dans un accord signé par le gouvernement malien, le MNLA et le Mouvement arabe de l'Azawad (MAA) ne s'est pas concrétisé.

    Au vu des attaques répétées, l'incertitude règne quant à la question de savoir qui est responsable ; les troupes françaises, les forces de la MINUSMA et les rebelles touaregs contrôlent tous des secteurs différents de la ville de Gao. Pourtant, d'après Arbacane Ag Abzayack, le maire de Kidal, « il est évident que ce sont les rebelles touaregs qui contrôlent Kidal. »

    À Kidal, les troupes françaises de l'opération Serval se concentrent sur les interventions anti-jihadistes, tandis que la MINUSMA et les troupes maliennes sont chargées de sécuriser la ville. Malgré ces efforts, deux tiers des habitants d'âge adulte portent une arme à feu pour se protéger, a confié à IRIN M. Ag Abzayack de Bamako, où il se rendait. « Parce qu'il n'y a pas de gouvernement, tout le monde n'en fait qu'à sa guise. »

    Les soldats maliens n'ont été autorisés à revenir à Kidal qu'au mois de juillet, en raison des craintes d'affrontements qui les opposeraient aux groupes rebelles touaregs. Depuis, ils « n'ont pas beaucoup quitté le camp », a confié le maire.

    Plus tôt ce mois-ci, le MNLA, le MAA et le Haut Conseil pour l'unité de l'Azawad (HCUA) se sont réunis pour présenter un front uni dans les pourparlers avec les autorités de Bamako, qui doivent commencer ce mois-ci.

    Au début du mois de novembre, quand la coalition MNLA/MAA/HCUA a remis les clés des bâtiments administratifs à la MINUSMA en vue de leur remplacement par le gouvernement malien, les femmes et les jeunes se sont rassemblés devant le bureau du gouverneur et ont protesté en soutien aux rebelles.

    « Jusqu'à présent, les représentants du gouvernement ne sont pas revenus et personne ne sait qui dirige », a-t-il dit.

    Manque de soldats

    Alors que les soldats de l'opération française Serval, de l'armée malienne et de la MINUSMA sont tous présents dans le Nord, leur nombre ne suffit pas à sécuriser ce vaste territoire, selon les experts.

    Parmi les 2 000 soldats français qui se trouvent toujours au Mali, près de 1 800 sont déployés dans le Nord (la plupart à Gao, et le reste à Tombouctou, à Kidal et à Tessalit).

    Après l'assassinat de deux journalistes radio français au début du mois de novembre, revendiqué par AQMI, la France a renforcé sa présence militaire à Kidal et le nombre de soldats est passé à 350, selon son porte-parole, Hubert de Quievrecourt. Cependant, une réduction des troupes à un millier de soldats est toujours prévue après les élections législatives.

    Ce processus était censé coïncider avec le renforcement des forces de la MINUSMA et l'envoi de 12 600 soldats ; mais, jusqu'à présent, seulement 5 162 membres du personnel de la MINUSMA sont au Mali.

    Les raisons de cette faible présence sont variées : le retrait des forces du Niger qui se heurte à une crise de sécurité interne, l'engagement réduit du Tchad suite aux lourdes pertes de soldats dans les combats au nord, et l'escalade de la violence dans le pays voisin, la République centrafricaine.

    Quelque 2 675 soldats de la MINUSMA sont à Gao, Tessalit, Aguelhok, Kida, Ménaka et Ansongo ; 1 823 sont placés pour garantir la sécurité de Tombouctou, Goss, Douentza, Sévaré, Goundam et Diabaly ; et 664 servent en tant que militaires ou policiers à Kidal.

    Un nombre croissant de militaires et de policiers est attendu prochainement en provenance du Bangladesh, du Burkina Faso, du Cambodge, de la Chine, des Pays-Bas et du Rwanda, selon M. Quievrecourt.

    Dans ce contexte de capacité insuffisante, l'armée malienne renforce progressivement sa présence, tandis que les formateurs de l'Union européenne tentent de préparer les troupes. Jusqu'à présent, l'armée a renforcé les points de contrôle et les patrouilles autour des villes de Tombouctou et de Gao. Elle a également intensifié sa présence près de la frontière mauritanienne et dans le cercle de Gourma Rharous, à la frontière avec le Niger, où la présence rebelle s'est prolongée pendant plusieurs mois après la libération du Nord, a déclaré le colonel-major Abdoulaye Coulibaly, responsable de l'armée au Nord.

    L'armée poursuit sa lutte contre les cellules dormantes dans les petites villes et les zones rurales, a déclaré M. Coulibaly. À son avis, les bombardements de Tombouctou et les attaques à la roquette de Gao « ont bénéficié de l'aide de personnes à l'intérieur et autour de Gao. Ils sont les maris, les fils et les frères des citoyens de Gao et de Tombouctou, et c'est pourquoi nous demandons à la population de nous aider à traquer ces criminels ».

    Il a ajouté : « Ma principale préoccupation n'est pas le nombre de troupes de maintien de la paix sur le terrain, mais l'endroit où elles sont déployées. »

    Même si certaines personnes déplacées à l'intérieur du territoire reviennent de leur plein gré, il y a peu de chances que parmi les 140 000 réfugiés maliens dans les pays voisins, certains soient susceptibles de revenir, à moins que la sécurité soit renforcée, a déclaré M. Coulibaly.

    Parmi les habitants de Tombouctou réfugiés dans le camp mauritanien de Mbera, la méfiance s'est généralisée. Rares sont ceux qui ont l'intention de revenir. Mohammed Ag Adnan, un Touareg de Tombouctou, a confié à IRIN qu'il ne faisait pas confiance aux militaires en place. « Dans le Nord, si vous avez la peau claire [si vous êtes touareg ou arabe], vous risquez de vous faire attaquer, » a-t-il déclaré.

    La question des retours est délicate, a déclaré M. Coulibaly : « Les retours [des personnes déplacées et des réfugiés], ainsi que la réouverture des cliniques, des écoles et des institutions gouvernementales sont importants pour renforcer la sécurité et empêcher les terroristes de reprendre le contrôle de certaines zones. »

    kh/aj/rz-fc/ld

    [FIN]


    0 0

    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Somalia
    preview


    SITUATION OVERVIEW

    The humanitarian crisis in Somalia remains one of the largest and most complex in the world with climatic shocks, armed conflict and protracted displacement. While over 3 million people still require humanitarian assistance, humanitarian access remains extremely challenging.

    In October, Jowhar and Balcad districts in Middle Shabelle region experienced flooding due to seasonal rains leading to temporary displacements in some villages. Humanitarian partners have worked to provide assistance to the affected people, despite logistical challenges and localised insecurity.


    0 0

    Source: Croix-Rouge Française, European Union
    Country: Mauritania
    preview


    Introduction

    Une insécurité alimentaire structurelle

    Pays sahélien et peu peuplé (3,5 millions de personnes en 20081), la Mauritanie fait face à une insécurité alimentaire structurelle et croissante à l’instar de l’ensemble des pays de la zone sahélienne. Les cycles répétés et de plus en plus rapprochés des épisodes de sécheresse ont pour corollaire une dégradation des ressources naturelles et des potentialités productives. Le pays importe l’équivalent de 70% des besoins alimentaires de la population.

    Aussi, la sécurité alimentaire des populations rurales et urbaines est grandement tributaire des fluctuations des prix des produits de base sur les marchés mondiaux mais également de l’aide internationale. Les opérations d’assistance aux populations affectées par l’insécurité alimentaire sont ponctuelles et répondent aux crises conjoncturelles, faisant le plus souvent suite à une mauvaise saison d’hivernage. Néanmoins, la régularité, voire l’intensification des crises ne fait finalement que révéler le caractère structurel de l’insécurité alimentaire. L’accès aux denrées alimentaires de base par des populations dont les avoirs relatifs aux moyens d’existence semblent assez limités et fragiles constitue la principale problématique de l’insécurité alimentaire. Les crises ponctuelles ne font alors que l’exacerber.

    La cartographie nationale de cette insécurité alimentaire est variable. La partie Sud du pays, espace le plus densément peuplé, montre généralement les taux d’insécurité alimentaire et nutritionnelle et les taux de pauvreté structurelle les plus élevés. Ce phénomène touche plus particulièrement la zone de l’Aftout, communément appelée « triangle de la pauvreté », qui s’étend sur trois wilayas dont une grande partie de la wilaya du Gorgol.


older | 1 | .... | 188 | 189 | (Page 190) | 191 | 192 | .... | 728 | newer