Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

ReliefWeb - Updates

older | 1 | .... | 156 | 157 | (Page 158) | 159 | 160 | .... | 728 | newer

    0 0

    Source: UNOSAT
    Country: Somalia
    preview


    Summary: A total of 379 spatially distinct IDP shelter concentrations were identified as of 3 June 2013 within Mogadishu, representing a decrease of 134 IDP sites since the last UNOSAT analysis which used an image from 2 May 2012. An estimate of the total number of IDP structures located in Mogadishu indicates a minimum figure of at least 61,000 mostly informal shelters. The number of IDP camps has significantly reduced in multiple areas of Mogadishu. This report is the fifth in a series of IDP analyses done by UNOSAT since 2011 and is based on a time-series analysis of shelter concentrations within the city of Mogadishu using multiple satellite images acquired between 30 March 2011 and 3 June 2013. This assessment has not yet been validated in the field. Please send feedback to UNITAR/UNOSAT.


    0 0

    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Mali
    preview


    Faits saillants

    · La situation nutritionnelle est sérieuse pour l’ensemble de la région de Gao avec un taux de malnutrition aiguë globale (MAG) de 13,5 pour cent. Un taux de MAG de 17 pour cent a été trouvé dans le district sanitaire de Bourem dépassant ainsi le seuil d’urgence fixé à 15 pour cent.

    · Des mouvements très significatifs de retours de déplacés et de réfugiés dans le nord ont été rapportés par les acteurs humanitaires au cours des dernières semaines. Si ces mouvements sont confirmés, la situation humanitaire déjà assez préoccupante dans le nord risque de s’aggraver.

    · Le fonctionnement normal des services sociaux de base dans le nord reste limité à cause de l’insuffisance du personnel et des ressources disponibles.

    · Dans le cadre de la lutte contre l’augmentation des cas de paludisme durant la saison des pluies, le cluster santé a renforcé ses stocks pour la prévention et la prise en charge.

    · L’appel de fonds humanitaire (CAP) pour le Mali est financé à 30 pour cent. Plus de 142 millions de dollars sont mobilisés sur la requête d’environ 476 millions de dollars.


    0 0

    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Mali
    preview


    HIGHLIGHTS

    The nutritional situation is “serious” in the entire region of Gao with a rate of global acute malnutrition (GAM) of 13.5 percent. In the Bourem health district the GAM rate is 17 percent, which exceeds the emergency threshold of 15 percent.

    Significant spontaneous return movements of internally displaced persons and refugees have been reported by humanitarian partners in the north over the last weeks. If these movements are confirmed, the humanitarian situation in the north, which is already a source of concern, could worsen.

    The normal delivery of basic social services in the north remains limited due to the lack of staff and resources.

    The Consolidated Appeal for Mali is 30 percent funded. More than $142 million are mobilized on a requirement of $ 476 million.


    0 0

    Source: European Commission Humanitarian Aid department
    Country: Djibouti
    preview


    Key messages

    • One of the aims of European Commission's humanitarian aid actions in Djibouti is to reduce people's vulnerability to droughts and climate - caused disasters. This can be achieved by increasing communities' resilience to respond better to upcoming crises ;

    • The European Commission also works on improving the food situation in the country as well as on fighting malnutrition and malnutrition - related diseases. Access to clean water and sanitary facilities still needs further development in Djibouti;

    • The European Commission as well aims to bring durable solutions for refugees present in Djibouti.

    Humanitarian situation and major needs

    Since 2005, Djibouti is increasingly suffering from water scarcity due to poor rains. This has led to a reduction of water sources and pasture for livestock.
    As a result the country has faced serious food deficits. Particularly affected are the rural communities and people dependent on pastoral activities.
    As a result of the last drought in 2010 - 11, the worst in 60 years, the number of people at risk of hunger in Djibouti has dramatically increased especially in rural areas but has now stabilised . Having been displaced from their homes in rural areas, an estimated 200 000 people are living in the slums around Dji bouti town with poor access to water or minimum sanitation facilities.

    In addition to the drought, the violence and instability in south central Somalia has resulted in an increasing number of asylum - seekers arriving in Djibouti.
    Around 200,000 refugees have been registered, the majority of whom are from Somalia.
    Djibouti remains one of the main migration roads to the Arabic Peninsula with 80% of those migrating (on average 107 000 per year) seeking better living conditions outside the Horn of Africa.
    Djibouti continues to experience high food prices especially in urban and peri - urban areas, where levels of unemployment remain high. Poor urban households in Djibouti City rely on food assistance and kinship to meet their food needs.


    0 0

    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Mali

    07/20/2013 14:34 GMT

    BAMAKO, 20 juillet 2013 (AFP) - Cinq personnes -quatre agents électoraux et un élu- ont été enlevées samedi par des hommes armés à Tessalit, dans la région de Kidal (nord-est du Mali), a affirmé à l'AFP un responsable administratif local.

    "Quatre agents électoraux et un élu de Tessalit, tous de nationalité malienne (...), ont été enlevés samedi par des hommes armés" dans cette localité à environ 200 km au nord de Kidal, a déclaré ce responsable au gouvernorat de Kidal.

    Selon lui, "ils étaient à la mairie de Tessalit pour organiser la distribution des cartes d'électeurs" en vue du premier tour de la présidentielle prévu le 28 juillet.

    "Actuellement, le gouverneur est en réunion de crise à Kidal pour voir ce qu'il faut faire. On n'a toujours pas de nouvelles des personnes enlevées", a ajouté le même responsable.

    Une source militaire africaine sur place a confirmé l'enlèvement, sans donner de précisions sur le nombre d'otages. "Des agents électoraux et un élu ont été enlevés samedi à Tessalit", a-t-elle indiqué sans plus de détails.

    L'identité des preneurs d'otages n'est pas encore connue.

    "Tout porte à croire que c'est un coup du MNLA (Mouvement national de libération de l'Azawad, rébellion touareg) qui ne veut pas d'élection", a affirmé un fonctionnaire au ministère de la Sécurité.

    Le MNLA contrôlait depuis février Kidal, y refusant la présence de l'armée et de l'administration maliennes, jusqu'à la signature, le 18 juin, d'un accord à Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso) entre les autorités maliennes, le MNLA, et un autre groupe armé touareg.

    Cet accord a permis le cantonnement dans la ville des hommes du MNLA, qui s'est fait en parallèle avec l'arrivée le 5 juillet de 150 soldats maliens suivi d'un retour de l'administration.

    Ces enlèvements surviennent au lendemain de violences dans la ville de Kidal entre Touareg et Noirs, ayant fait selon un bilan officiel quatre morts et plusieurs blessés, avec également des pillages et incendies.

    Le Mali se prépare à tenir le 28 juillet le premier tour de la présidentielle, censé amorcer la réconciliation, rétablir l'ordre constitutionnel interrompu par un coup d'Etat en mars 2012, et après l'intervention de l'armée française en janvier 2013 qui a permis de chasser les islamistes occupant le nord du pays.

    sd-cs/hba

    © 1994-2013 Agence France-Presse


    0 0

    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Mali

    07/20/2013 15:03 GMT

    BAMAKO, July 20, 2013 (AFP) - Gunmen abducted four polling staff and a local official Saturday in the northern Malian town of Tessalit, a week before a presidential poll meant to restore the country's unity, a local official said.

    "Four electoral staff and an elected Tessalit official, all of them Malian... were snatched by gunmen Saturday," an official in the Kidal governor's office told AFP.

    He said the five hostages had been at the town hall in Tessalit, a remote town some 200 kilometres (125 miles) north of the flashpoint northern city of Kidal, to plan the distribution of ID cards to registered voters when they were kidnapped.

    "The governor is currently in an emergency meeting in Kidal to see what needs to be done. We have not yet had any news on the abductees," he said.

    An African military source in Kidal, where four people were killed in pre-election violence Thursday, confirmed receiving information about a kidnapping involving polling staff and an elected official, but did not specify the number of victims.

    A Malian security ministry official said the kidnapping appeared to be the work of the minority Tuareg rebel group the National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad (MNLA).

    "Everything indicates this is an attack by the MNLA, which doesn't want there to be an election," the official said.

    The MNLA took control of Kidal in February after a French-led military intervention ousted Al-Qaeda-linked Islamist fighters who had seized control of most of northern Mali.

    The Malian authorities finally reclaimed the city after signing a deal with the MNLA and another Tuareg group on June 18 aimed at reuniting the country and clearing the way for elections to restore democratic rule.

    Under the deal, MNLA forces moved into barracks as 150 regular Malian troops were deployed to secure Kidal ahead of the July 28 vote.

    The kidnappings come after violence between Tuaregs and Mali's majority black population rocked Kidal on Thursday and Friday.

    Officials said armed men went on a rampage Thursday, looting and ransacking shops and businesses, killing four people and wounding many others. On Friday, unidentified arsonists set fire to the city's central market.

    sd-cs/jhb/gd

    © 1994-2013 Agence France-Presse


    0 0

    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Mali

    07/20/2013 18:12 GMT

    Par Serge DANIEL

    BAMAKO, 20 juillet 2013 (AFP) - Six personnes, dont des agents électoraux et un élu local, ont été enlevées samedi par des hommes armés dans la région de Kidal (nord-est du Mali), aggravant encore les tensions sécuritaires à huit jours d'une élection présidentielle jugée cruciale.

    Les rapts, commis "par des hommes armés" non encore identifiés, se sont déroulés dans la localité de Tessalit, à environ 200 km au nord de la ville de Kidal, chef-lieu de région, selon un responsable administratif et une source militaire africaine, tous deux joints au téléphone par l'AFP depuis Bamako.

    Les premières informations faisaient état de l'enlèvement de "quatre agents électoraux et un élu" local, "tous de nationalité malienne". Mais "après enquête, ce ne sont plus quatre mais cinq agents électoraux et l'adjoint au maire de Kidal qui ont été enlevés", a indiqué le responsable administratif en poste au gouvernorat de Kidal.

    Ils "étaient à la mairie de Tessalit pour organiser la distribution des cartes d'électeurs" en vue du premier tour de la présidentielle prévu le 28 juillet, a-t-il ajouté, en mettant en cause des membres du Mouvement national de libération de l'Azawad (MNLA, rébellion touareg).

    "Les enlèvements (...) ont été organisés par des éléments du MNLA. Nous sommes formels sur ce point", a soutenu ce responsable, sans plus de détails.

    Auparavant, un fonctionnaire au ministère malien de la Sécurité déjà accusé la rébellion touareg, affirmant à l'AFP: "Tout porte à croire que c'est un coup du MNLA qui ne veut pas d'élection".

    Le MNLA avait pris le contrôle de Kidal en février 2013, à la faveur de l'intervention de l'armée française en janvier 2013 qui avait permis de chasser ses anciens alliés jihadistes ayant occupé le nord du Mali pendant près de dix mois.

    Patrouilles militaires dans Kidal

    Les rebelles touareg ont longtemps refusé la présence de l'armée et de l'Administration maliennes à Kidal. Jusqu'à la signature, le 18 juin à Ouagadougou, d'un accord avec le gouvernement malien qui a permis le cantonnement dans la ville des hommes du MNLA en parallèle avec l'arrivée le 5 juillet de 150 soldats maliens, suivi d'un retour de l'Administration.

    Ces enlèvements surviennent au lendemain de violences dans la ville de Kidal entre Touareg et Noirs ayant fait entre jeudi soir et vendredi quatre morts et plusieurs blessés, selon le gouvernement malien. Des boutiques ont été pillées et saccagées, le marché de la ville a été incendié.

    Le calme était revenu samedi matin dans la ville, où peu d'habitants étaient cependant visibles dans les rues d'après des résidents.

    Le retour au calme a été confirmé par une source militaire africaine au sein de la force de l'ONU au Mali, la Minusma, dont un contingent est déployé à Kidal. Un militaire malien a évoqué des patrouilles de soldats de l'ONU et de l'armée malienne dans la ville. Ces violences font planer le doute sur la possibilité d'organiser le premier tour de l'élection présidentielle le 28 juillet à Kidal, d'où sont originaires de nombreux Touareg malien. Ce, alors que la campagne bat son plein dans le reste du pays, notamment dans la capitale Bamako, à 1.500 km de là, et les principales villes du sud du pays.

    Un seul candidat, Ibrahima Boubacar Keïta dit IBK, parmi les favoris du scrutin, s'est rendu à Kidal le 15 juillet pour une visite de quelques heures.

    Samedi matin, avant l'annonce des rapts, une source administrative malienne avait assuré à l'AFP qu'en dépit des violences, "tout sera mis en oeuvre pour que les élections se tiennent à Kidal"à la date prévue.

    Le 17 juillet, un des candidats, Tiébilé Dramé, artisan de l'accord de paix entre Bamako et les groupes armés touareg, avait dénoncé les conditions de préparation du scrutin, particulièrement à Kidal, et annoncé pour protester son retrait de la course.

    sd-cs/stb/hba

    © 1994-2013 Agence France-Presse


    0 0

    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Mali

    07/20/2013 19:03 GMT

    by Serge DANIEL

    BAMAKO, July 20, 2013 (AFP) - Gunmen abducted five polling staff and a local official Saturday in the northern Malian town of Tessalit, a week before a presidential election meant to restore the country's unity, a local official said.

    The poll workers and an elected Tessalit official, all of them Malian, were snatched by unidentified "gunmen", an official in the Kidal governor's office told AFP.

    First reports had spoken of four electoral staff and an official, but an inquiry showed that five agents and the deputy mayor of Kidal had been seized.

    The official said the six hostages had been at the town hall in Tessalit, a remote town some 200 kilometres (125 miles) north of the flashpoint northern city of Kidal, to plan the distribution of ID cards to registered voters when they were kidnapped.

    "The governor is currently in an emergency meeting in Kidal to see what needs to be done. We have not yet had any news on the abductees," he said.

    An African military source in Kidal, where four people were killed in pre-election violence Thursday, confirmed receiving information about a kidnapping involving polling staff and an elected official, but did not specify the number of victims.

    A Malian security ministry official said the kidnapping appeared to be the work of the minority-Tuareg rebel group the National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad (MNLA).

    "Everything indicates this is an attack by the MNLA, which doesn't want there to be an election," the official said.

    The MNLA took control of Kidal in February after a French-led military intervention ousted Al-Qaeda-linked Islamist fighters who had seized control of most of northern Mali.

    The Malian authorities finally reclaimed the city after signing a deal with the MNLA and another Tuareg group on June 18 aimed at reuniting the country and clearing the way for elections to restore democratic rule.

    Under the deal, MNLA forces moved into barracks as 150 regular Malian troops were deployed to secure Kidal ahead of the July 28 vote.

    The kidnappings come after violence between Tuaregs and Mali's majority black population rocked Kidal on Thursday and Friday.

    Officials said armed men went on a rampage Thursday, looting and ransacking shops and businesses, killing four people and wounding many others.

    On Friday, unidentified arsonists set fire to the city's central market.

    Many Malians accuse the light-skinned Tuaregs of being responsible for the chaotic sequence that saw the country split in two for nine months -- with the northern half ruled by groups that imposed an extreme form of Islamic law -- and shattered what had been considered a democratic success story in the restive region.

    When the MNLA launched their offensive in January 2012, they humiliated the Malian army by seizing a string of northern towns.

    Mid-level army officers angry over the losses then overthrew president Amadou Toumani Toure in March 2012, blaming him for the army's weak response.

    The coup unleashed a crisis that saw the Tuareg separatists seize Mali's vast desert north along with a trio of Islamist groups that then proceeded to chase out their former allies the MNLA and impose brutal sharia rule on their territory, until the French-led intervention forced them out.

    Mali has since been battling to restore a measure of stability.

    The decision to hold the first round of the presidential election on July 28, followed by a second round on August 11 if necessary, was taken by the Malian government under pressure from the international community.

    But the presence of the Malian army has stoked tensions in the powder-keg town of Kidal, with pro- and anti-government protests a regular occurrence and several troops injured by demonstrators.

    Many observers and some Malian officials have suggested the election is being held too soon and that the interim administration needs more time to organise a credible poll.

    sd-cs/jmm/bm/jhb

    © 1994-2013 Agence France-Presse


    0 0

    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Mali

    07/22/2013 03:48 GMT

    by Serge DANIEL

    BAMAKO, July 22, 2013 (AFP) - Tuareg rebels held talks Sunday with Mali's interim president, discussing possibilities for peace and reconciliation, but tensions remained high as a homemade bomb was found in flashpoint city Kidal a week from a crucial presidential vote.

    In a further sign of the difficulties involved, a Tuareg rebel leader was arrested over the abduction of six officials in northern Mali the previous day. All six were released and "doing well" on Sunday, authorities said.

    The kidnappings were blamed on the National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad (MNLA), a rebel group founded to fight for independence for Mali's minority Tuareg people.

    Ibrahim Ag Assaleh, one of the Tuareg delegates to the talks with interim president Dioncounda Traore said: "We talked about peace, we talked about reconciliation."

    "I call on all the sons of this country...to work to find a solution to the recurring rebellions," he added after the talks in the capital Bamako.

    The conciliation talks, which had not been announced, included members of the MNLA and another Tuareg group, the High Council for the Unity of Azawad (HCUA), signatories to a peace deal signed with the Malian government last month.

    The talks were set to resume on Monday but they do so against a backdrop of security tensions in the Kidal region ahead of the presidential election scheduled for July 28.

    The vote is considered vital to the future of Mali which is battling to restore democratic rule after an 18-month crisis that saw it suffer the back-to-back blows of a Tuareg rebellion, a military coup and the seizure of half its territory by Islamist extremists.

    The MNLA took control of Kidal in February after a French-led military intervention ousted Al-Qaeda-linked fighters who had piggybacked on the Tuareg rebellion to take control of most of northern Mali then chase out their former MNLA allies and impose a brutal form of Islamic law.

    The Malian authorities finally reclaimed the city, after signing the deal with the MNLA and the HCUA, on June 18 aimed at reuniting the country and clearing the way for elections.

    Saturday's kidnappings came after violence between the light-skinned Tuaregs and Mali's majority black population rocked Kidal on Thursday and Friday, leaving four people dead, businesses looted and ransacked and the city's central market burned.

    "It was Baye Ag Diknane, an official of the MNLA, who ordered the abduction," a Mali official said, adding that the Tuareg rebel had been arrested and was under questioning.

    An African military source in Kidal confirmed the hostages' release.

    The six officials had been at the town hall in Tessalit, a remote outpost some 200 kilometres (125 miles) from key northern city Kidal, to plan the distribution of identity cards to voters for the July 28 election when they were abducted.

    No one has claimed the kidnapping -- including the MNLA, which was immediately blamed by officials in Kidal and in the Malian security ministry.

    Kidal residents say Malian troops and UN peacekeepers have been on patrol and that calm has largely been restored.

    But panic erupted Sunday morning when a homemade bomb was found in the middle of the city, witnesses said.

    Residents were evacuated from the area and the device was disarmed, a local official told AFP.

    Observers have increasingly cast doubt on whether Kidal will be ready for the election.

    One of the 28 presidential candidates, Tiebile Drame, dropped out of the race on Wednesday saying the country was not prepared, especially Kidal.

    The favourites in the race are Ibrahim Boubacar Keita, a former prime minister, and Soumaila Cisse, an ex-cabinet member and former top West African official.

    Cisse told a campaign rally Saturday in Bamako that he was "deeply concerned over the risk of widespread fraud" and had alerted the UN.

    The leader of France's military operation in Mali, General Gregoire de Saint-Quentin, said Mali was not "completely stabilised" despite the French-led intervention's military success against the Islamist extremists.

    "Two-thirds of the country spent a year under the control of terrorists who tore down all administrative and security structures," the general told French weekly Journal du Dimanche.

    "The Malian army was defeated and its equipment destroyed. It takes time to rebuild all that in such a big country."

    sd-cs/jhb/pvh/lm

    © 1994-2013 Agence France-Presse


    0 0

    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Mali

    07/21/2013 16:31 GMT

    Par Serge DANIEL

    BAMAKO, 21 juillet 2013 (AFP) - Six personnes, dont cinq agents électoraux, enlevées samedi dans la région de Kidal (nord-est du Mali) ont été relâchées, mais les préoccupations sécuritaires demeuraient vives dimanche dans cette zone à une semaine d'une présidentielle cruciale pour le pays.

    Nouvel élément inquiétant: une bombe de fabrication artisanale a été découverte en plein centre-ville de Kidal dimanche matin. Des dispositions ont été prises pour désamorcer l'engin, a indiqué à l'AFP une source administrative sur place.

    Selon un responsable au gouvernorat de Kidal, chef-lieu de région, les enlèvements avaient été perpétrés par des hommes armés samedi dans la localité de Tessalit, au nord de Kidal. Il y a eu six otages au total: cinq agents électoraux et un élu local.

    "Toutes les personnes enlevées samedi à Tessalit ont été libérés, elles se portent bien", a-t-il déclaré dimanche à l'AFP.

    "C'est Baye Ag Diknane, un responsable du MNLA (Mouvement national de libération de l'Azawad, MNLA), qui a commandité le coup. Il est actuellement entendu par les forces internationales à Tessalit. Il est arrêté", a-t-il ajouté.

    Une source militaire africaine à Kidal a confirmé la libération des otages, indiquant d'après le témoignage de l'un d'eux, que les ravisseurs ont utilisé "un véhicule avec drapeau du MNLA".

    Les rapts n'ont pas été revendiqués mais, dès samedi, deux sources administrative et ministérielle maliennes avaient accusé des membres du MNLA d'en être les auteurs.

    Le MNLA avait pris le contrôle de Kidal en février 2013, à la faveur de l'intervention de l'armée française en janvier 2013 qui avait permis de chasser ses anciens alliés jihadistes ayant occupé le nord du Mali pendant près de dix mois.

    Les rebelles touareg ont refusé la présence de l'armée et de l'administration maliennes à Kidal jusqu'à la signature, le 18 juin à Ouagadougou, d'un accord avec le gouvernement malien ayant permis le cantonnement dans la ville de ses hommes, en parallèle avec l'arrivée début juillet de 150 soldats maliens, puis du retour de l'administration.

    Craintes de "fraudes"électorales

    Les enlèvements se sont produits au lendemain de violences dans la ville de Kidal entre Touareg et Noirs ayant fait officiellement entre les 18 et 19 juillet quatre morts et plusieurs blessés.

    Depuis samedi, le calme régnait dans la ville, où ont patrouillé des soldats de l'ONU et de l'armée malienne, selon des résidents. Mais l'inquiétude est montée d'un cran avec la découverte de la bombe artisanale, qui a créé un mouvement de panique, d'après des témoins.

    Ces derniers développements font planer le doute sur la possibilité d'organiser la présidentielle à Kidal. Un des 28 candidats dont les dossiers ont été validés, Tiébilé Dramé, a annoncé le 17 juillet son retrait de la course en dénonçant les conditions de préparation du scrutin, particulièrement à Kidal.

    Lors d'un meeting samedi à Bamako, Soumaïla Cissé, un des candidats donnés favoris, s'est dit inquiet face à "des risques de fraudes généralisées"à l'élection.

    Dans d'autres milieux, s'expriment des préoccupations sécuritaires pour ce pays de 1.240.000 km2 éprouvé par 18 mois de crise politique et une guerre contre les jihadistes menée avec l'appui déterminant de la France et son opération Serval, ainsi que d'autres troupes étrangères.

    En dépit d'une "dynamique de succès militaires répétés", le Mali n'est pas "complètement stabilisé", a reconnu le général Grégoire de Saint-Quentin, qui a dirigé l'opération Serval au Mali. "Il faut du temps pour reconstruire" toutes les structures mises à mal ou détruites par les groupes armés", a-t-il dit à l'hebdomadaire français Le Journal du Dimanche.

    D'après une source militaire malienne dimanche, un groupe de soldats maliens qui se dirigeait vers Aguelhoc, localité au nord-ouest de Kidal, a été prié de "rebrousser chemin" par les forces françaises présentes dans la zone, ce qu'il a fait "pour ne pas envenimer la situation". Aucun détail n'a été fourni.

    Interrogé sur ce sujet par l'AFP à Paris, le porte-parole du ministère français de la Défense, le colonel Thierry Burkhard, a simplement répondu: "Les forces françaises n'ont pas vocation à donner d'ordre à des militaires maliens".

    sd-aml-cs/hba

    © 1994-2013 Agence France-Presse


    0 0

    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Mali

    07/21/2013 22:26 GMT

    Par Ahamadou CISSE, Serge DANIEL

    BAMAKO, 21 juillet 2013 (AFP) - Des représentants de rebelles touareg reçus à Bamako ont parlé de paix avec le président, dans un contexte de tensions sécuritaires dans la région de Kidal (nord-est) où une bombe artisanale a été découverte et des agents électoraux retenus otages pendant plusieurs heures.

    Avec le président Dioncounda Traoré, "nous avons parlé de la paix, nous avons parlé de la réconciliation", "j'appelle à tous les fils de ce pays (...) à oeuvrer à trouver une solution aux rébellions récurrentes", a déclaré au nom des délégués touareg Ibrahim Ag Mahmoud Assaleh à l'issue de l'audience à la résidence présidentielle.

    Une grande discrétion a entouré jusqu'à la dernière minute cette rencontre, à laquelle ont participé sept membres du Mouvement national de libération de l'Azawad (MNLA) et du Haut conseil pour l'unité de l'Azawad (HCUA), signataires d'un accord de paix avec le gouvernement malien le 18 juin à Ouagadougou.

    Les représentants des groupes rebelles touareg sont généralement basés dans le nord du Mali, notamment leur fief de Kidal ou à l'étranger.

    Les discussions de dimanche doivent être suivies lundi à Bamako d'"une réunion de suivi-évaluation des accords de Ouagadougou", selon leur porte-parole.

    Le MNLA avait pris le contrôle de Kidal en février 2013, à la faveur de l'intervention de l'armée française en janvier 2013 qui avait permis de chasser ses anciens alliés jihadistes.

    Les rebelles touareg ont refusé la présence de l'armée et de l'administration maliennes à Kidal jusqu'à la signature de l'accord de Ouagadougou, qui a permis le cantonnement dans la ville de ses hommes, en parallèle avec l'arrivée début juillet de 150 soldats maliens, puis du retour de l'Administration.

    L'audience présidentielle s'est déroulée dans un contexte de tensions sécuritaires dans la région de Kidal et à une semaine de l'élection présidentielle du 28 juillet jugée cruciale pour le Mali après 18 mois de crise politique marquée par un coup d'État militaire (mars 2012) et la guerre contre des groupes jihadistes.

    A Kidal, une bombe artisanale a été découverte en plein centre-ville dimanche matin. Deux jours auparavant, la ville avait connu des violences meurtrières entre Touareg et des membres d'autres communautés.

    Et samedi, cinq agents électoraux et un élu local qui préparaient le scrutin avaient été enlevés à Tessalit, au nord de Kidal, par des hommes armés soupçonnés d'être du MNLA. Ils ont été libérés dimanche et "se portent bien", selon un responsable au gouvernorat de Kidal.

    "Beaucoup de règlements de comptes dans cette zone"

    "C'est Baye Ag Diknane, un responsable du MNLA, qui a commandité le coup. Il est actuellement entendu par les forces internationales à Tessalit. Il est arrêté", a précisé cette source administrative.

    A Bamako dimanche soir, le porte-parole des rebelles touareg a nié toute implication du MNLA dans ces rapts. "Nous ignorons" les auteurs de ces enlèvements, "il y a beaucoup de règlements de comptes dans cette zone. (...) Ce sont les forces armées du MNLA qui ont poursuivi" les kidnappeurs "pour pouvoir libérer" les otages, a-t-il assuré.

    D'après des résidents joints sur place, le calme a régné dimanche à Tessalit ainsi qu'à Kidal, ville où l'inquiétude est cependant montée d'un cran avec la découverte de la bombe artisanale, qui a créé un mouvement de panique.

    Ces derniers développements font planer le doute sur la possibilité d'organiser la présidentielle à Kidal.

    Un des 28 candidats dont les dossiers ont été validés, Tiébilé Dramé, a annoncé le 17 juillet son retrait de la course en dénonçant les conditions de préparation du scrutin, particulièrement à Kidal.

    Lors d'un meeting samedi à Bamako, Soumaïla Cissé, un des candidats donnés favoris, s'est dit inquiet face à "des risques de fraudes généralisées"à l'élection.

    Dimanche, selon son entourage, son cortège de campagne a été contraint par des militaires de changer d'itinéraire à proximité d'un camp de l'armée à Kati, près de Bamako, où réside le chef des auteurs du putsch de mars 2012, le capitaine Amadou Sanogo. M. Cissé s'était farouchement opposé à ce coup d'Etat.

    Pour de nombreux observateurs, le Mali a fait la guerre contre les jihadistes avec l'appui déterminant de la France et son opération Serval, ainsi que d'autres troupes étrangères.

    Mais, en dépit d'une "dynamique de succès militaires répétés", il n'est pas "complètement stabilisé", a reconnu le général Grégoire de Saint-Quentin, qui a dirigé l'opération Serval, dans un entretien à l'hebdomadaire français Le Journal du Dimanche.

    bur-cs/abl

    © 1994-2013 Agence France-Presse


    0 0

    Source: UN Human Rights Council
    Country: Malawi

    Lilongwe/Geneva (22 July 2013) – “Recent high-profile food security policies have failed to rid Malawi of chronic food insecurity and malnutrition,” said Olivier De Schutter, the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to food, as he concluded his eleven-day mission to the Republic of Malawi.

    More than 50% of the country remains mired in poverty, with one quarter of ‘ultra poor’ Malawians earning less than the estimated costs of a diet providing minimum recommended calorie intake, and about half of all children suffering from acute or severe malnutrition.

    “Malawi is often held up as an example of how hunger can be tackled by subsidizing inputs for farmers. However, considerable challenges remain. Opportunities can be missed when too little is done to empower the poor and break cycles of dependency – on chemical fertilizer, on low-paying plantation work, and on tobacco.”

    “Malawians need a durable agricultural resource base and living wages – and currently they are getting neither,” the UN expert stated, adding: “It is particularly important to redress the balance at a time when Malawi is about to absorb a new wave of agricultural investment under the G8's New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition.”

    Through its Farm Input Subsidy Programme (FISP) more than a million beneficiaries have gained access to discounted fertilizers and seeds, allowing the country to raise yields. Yet, again this year, the country will need to import maize for humanitarian food aid to Malawian farmers who are unable to feed themselves.

    There is a need to reassess whether FISP is the most effective use of available resources to protect the right to adequate food for all Malawians. FISP – dependent on costly fertilizer imports – takes up more than 50% of Malawi's agricultural budget and crowds out other priorities such as extension services and social protection.

    “It is time for Malawi to move beyond the fertilizer-led “green revolution” and invest in the Brown and Blue Revolutions needed to rebuild soil fertility and water retention,” the Special Rapporteur urged. He noted that the integration of legumes in cropping systems and agroforestry systems in Malawi are yielding more food than fertilizer-driven systems while rapidly restoring soil fertility. They are the foundations of sustainable food security. He emphasized the need to move away from the maize economy, and to link agricultural development to nutritional needs, an indispensable condition for lasting victories over malnutrition.

    The Special Rapporteur also identified wage and taxation policies as a major driver of poverty and hunger.

    The Malawian minimum wage, currently fixed at around US$ 1.12 per day, is one of the lowest in the world, and 300,000 tenant families on tobacco plantations – where 78,000 child labourers are employed – are only paid depending on the quantity and quality of tobacco sold to landlords. “The policy of providing abundant, cheap and non-unionized labour to plantation owners must be consigned to the past,” De Schutter stated.

    Meanwhile Malawi has lost over 10 percent of GDP to illicit outflows over the period 1980-2009, with mining companies exempted from customs duty, excise duty, VAT on mining machinery, plant and equipment. The UN expert warned: “Malawi's poor pay twice for the red carpet treatment given to multinational investors – in the suppression of their wages, and in the services deprived them by corporate tax exemptions.”

    He outlined a series of steps must be taken to redress the balance: Malawi must enforce a living wage, reserve open public tenders to companies paying it, allow workers to bargain collectively in all sectors, sign up to the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI), and work coherently across Government to negotiate fair taxation arrangements for investors.

    The UN expert concluded: “The country urgently needs a national food security strategy, underpinned by a Right to Food Framework Law, to hold policies to account when they do not yield benefits for the most food insecure and to ensure a coherent approach across sectors. By improving participation and accountability in the design and implementation of food security policies, Malawi can ensure that public investment will truly reach the poorest within the population.”

    De Schutter welcomed the wide support and inclusive discussions around a Draft Food Security Bill that could help to ground food entitlements in law. Noting that a trust fund could be established under the draft bill, De Schutter recommended seizing the opportunity of the investments attracted by the New Alliance, as well as the expected boom in the extractive industry, to fund urgently needed social policies and a new deal for agriculture. “It is essential that the country does not pursue investment for investment’s sake, but uses it as an opportunity to engage corporations in a genuine commitment to help improve the situation of Malawi’s poor and food insecure."

    (*) Check the full statement: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=13567&L...

    ENDS


    0 0

    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Mali

    07/22/2013 06:53 GMT

    Par Stéphane BARBIER

    BAMAKO, 22 juillet 2013 (AFP) - Risques d'attentats-suicides de jihadistes, distribution incomplète des cartes d'électeurs, vote incertain sur tout le territoire et pour 500.000 réfugiés et déplacés: les obstacles au bon déroulement du premier tour de la présidentielle du 28 juillet au Mali sont nombreux.

    L'intervention militaire internationale initiée par la France en janvier pour stopper une avancée vers le Sud de groupes jihadistes qui occupaient depuis neuf mois le nord du Mali pour ensuite les chasser de cette région, a en grande partie été atteint.

    Mais, a reconnu dimanche le général Grégoire de Saint-Quentin, qui a commandé l'opération française Serval au Mali, ce pays n'est pas encore "complètement stabilisé".

    "Il faut reconnaître à nos adversaires leur extrême faculté à se fondre dans l'immensité de cet océan de sable qu'est le désert. Néanmoins, même les meilleurs marins ont besoin de toucher un jour au port", a affirmé le général à l'hebdomadaire français, le Journal du dimanche, ajoutant: "C'est pourquoi nous avons ciblé en priorité les sanctuaires des terroristes".

    La crainte est que des éléments dits "résiduels" de groupes islamistes armés liés à Al-Qaïda qui ont occupé le nord du Mali ne saisissent l'occasion de la présidentielle pour faire un coup d'éclat sous forme d'attentats-suicides meurtriers, comme ils en ont commis les mois derniers au Mali, mais aussi au Niger voisin.

    Des tensions inévitables à Kidal

    La France, l'ONU et le régime de transition au pouvoir à Bamako ont en outre insisté sur la nécessité d'un vote sur l'ensemble du territoire national afin que le nouveau président élu ait la crédibilité indispensable au redressement et à la réconciliation d'un pays profondément divisé.

    De récentes violences qui ont fait quatre morts, de nombreux blessés et dégâts matériels dans la région de Kidal (nord-est), fief des Touareg et de leur rébellion du Mouvement de libération national de l'Azawad (MNLA), où des agents électoraux ont également été brièvement enlevés, font sérieusement douter que le scrutin puisse s'y tenir dimanche prochain.

    Ces incidents graves se sont produits en dépit de la signature d'un accord de paix, le 18 juin à Ouagadougou, entre le MNLA et le pouvoir de transition à Bamako permettant le cantonnement des rebelles touareg et le retour contesté de quelque 150 soldats maliens dans la ville de Kidal.

    "Les tensions et des violences étaient sans doute inévitables à Kidal, la signature d'un accord entre les dirigeants des groupes armés et Bamako ne mettant pas fin à la réalité des antagonismes et à l'existence de radicaux d'un côté comme de l'autre", a déclaré à l'AFP Gilles Yabi, analyste à International Crisis Group (ICG).

    "Dans la mesure où il ne s'agit que d'un accord intérimaire (l'accord de Ouagadougou) avant l'ouverture d'un processus de dialogue plus important après l'élection présidentielle, le jeu qui consiste à faire monter les enchères ne va pas cesser", selon M. Yabi qui ajoute: "L'impact sur l'élection et sur sa crédibilité dépendra de ce qu'il se passera le jour du vote à Kidal".

    Un signe positif cependant: des représentants du MNLA et d'un autre groupe rebelle, le Haut conseil pour l'unité de l'Azawad (HCUA), ont été reçus dimanche à Bamako par le président de transition Dioncounda Traoré, pour parler "de paix" et de "réconciliation".

    60% des cartes d'électeurs distribuées

    Si la région de Kidal suscite le plus d'interrogations et d'inquiétudes, le risque est aussi que les quelque 6.830.000 cartes électorales ne soient pas distribuées à temps dans d'autres régions. Le 18 juillet, un document officiel des organisateurs de l'élection soulignait que "le taux de remise des cartes"était "d'environ 60%".

    Et encore, la distribution des cartes ne concerne-t-elle en grande partie que les Maliens qui n'ont pas fui le conflit pour aller se réfugier à l'étranger ou dans d'autres régions du Mali, soit environ 500.000 personnes. Les modalités de vote pour ces déplacés et réfugiés restent floues, en particulier dans les immenses camps au Niger, au Burkina Faso et en Mauritanie.

    A ces obstacles, s'ajoutent un redéploiement seulement partiel de l'administration centrale dans le Nord et le fait que le scrutin se déroule en pleine saison dite "d'hivernage" en Afrique de l'Ouest, caractérisée par de fortes pluies dans le sud du Mali, des vents forts et des tempêtes de sable dans le Nord, qui gênent, voire empêchent, les déplacements.

    Couplé à la période de jeûne et de recueillement du ramadan actuellement en cours dans ce pays musulman, ces phénomènes pourraient accroître le taux d'abstention déjà assez faible au Mali en temps normal.

    Le risque est que ce scrutin soit "chaotique", ses résultats "contestés" et que le nouveau président élu n'ait pas "la légitimité nécessaire au rétablissement du pays", selon ICG.

    stb/cs/hm/hba


    0 0

    Source: Inter Press Service
    Country: Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad

    By Dorine Ekwe

    YAOUNDE, Jul 22 2013 (IPS) - At the Garoua Regional Hospital’s Paediatric Feeding Centre in northern Cameroon, Aicha Ahidjo* is relieved to hear that her one-year-old son will survive. The child was suffering from chronic malnutrition, and other children have died of it.

    It has cost Ahidjo a lot to get her son Ahmadou here. Ahmadou showed symptoms of swollen feet and dry and thinning hair. The 30-year-old mother was forced to defy her husband and bring their son to hospital. The child had developed Kwashiorkor as a result of severe protein deficiency.

    “Some months after the birth of the child, I fell pregnant again,” Ahidjo, who is six months pregnant, tells IPS.

    “I had to wean him, but his father didn’t want me to give him infant formula. He discouraged me from continuing to breastfeed the child and told me to feed him maize porridge and rock salt.” She was powerless to refuse her husband.

    “I gave in, but after some time I noticed that the child was tired and his skin was thinning. I spoke to my mother who told me that these were signs of malnutrition,” she explains.

    “Against my husband’s advice, I brought the child to hospital. The doctors here told me that I arrived just in time. Thank God.”

    Ahmadou is not the only child at the hospital suffering from malnutrition.

    In June, the centre’s medical staff registered 31 malnourished children. Six died, one recovered and 21 were transferred to other hospitals. The remaining three children, including Ahmadou, stayed at the hospital for treatment.

    Six-year-old Haouwa Aboui* was the last child to die at this centre in June. Her 60-year-old grandmother, Maimouna Aboui*, sits in front of their home, fatigued and despondent.

    “There are 16 of us living in this hut and there is not enough food. The little one could not bear the starvation,” Aboui tells IPS. “I was advised to give her water with sugar to give her energy. Her mother and I did that for two weeks. She died the day after we arrived at the hospital.”

    According to the most recent study by the National Institute of Statistics (NIS), published in October 2011, 33 percent of under-fives in Cameroon suffer from chronic malnutrition and 14 percent of them are severely malnourished.

    The community health division in the Ministry of Public Health believes that malnutrition is closely linked to Cameroon’s complex climate. In parts of the Adamawa, North and Far North Regions – a dry and semi-arid zone – nutritional deterioration is present among a large proportion of Cameroonian children and refugees, according to the ministry.

    In addition, the massive displacement of Chadian and Central African Republic refugees has added to the growing number of people unable to access food.

    The Far North and North Regions have the highest rate of infant malnutrition in the country because of a lack of food during the lean season, which lasts from mid-June to the end of August. Another contributing factor is the poor variety of foods consumed by the population, such as millet and sorghum.

    However, malnutrition is prevalent throughout the country, says Ines Lezama, a nutrition specialist at the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) in Cameroon.

    Celine Essengue, a member of local NGO Enfants Cameroun, gave IPS her assessment of the situation: “Cameroon is known to be a food-sufficient country. This means that the country doesn’t need to import food as it produces enough to feed its population. Poverty is preventing the Cameroonian people from having access to a varied and balanced diet.”

    According to NIS, 44 percent of children suffering from chronic malnutrition in the Central African Economic and Monetary Community live in Cameroon.

    UNICEF estimates that 57,616 children under the age of five are at risk of severe acute malnutrition in the North and Far North regions of the country, and that 145,000 children under the age of five will have stunted growth.

    Director of health promotion in the Ministry of Health, known only as Dr. Sa’a, told journalists at a recent briefing that “obesity is also a sign of malnutrition. Infant malnutrition is also due to the fact that very few infants are breastfed exclusively for the first six months after birth.”

    UNICEF, in conjunction with the government, works in 19 feeding centres in order to prevent complications.

    Dr. Joel Ekobena, a paediatrician at the Garoua district hospital, explains to IPS that they are increasingly working on prevention.

    “We educate mothers to recognise the first signs of malnutrition and to take their children as soon as possible for a check-up.”

    But access to healthcare also poses a problem: 23 out of 43 health districts in the North and Far North of the country are short of qualified personnel. According to NIS, the two regions have 92 doctors for an overall population of 5.5 million inhabitants.

    *Names changed to protect their identity.


    0 0

    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Mali
    preview


    APERÇU DE LA SITUATION

    Le conflit armé affectant le nord du Mali depuis 2012 a subi une escalade en janvier 2013. Ce conflit a causé, au 11 juillet 2013, le déplacement de 353 455 Personnes Déplacées Internes (PDIs) et provoqué un mouvement de 175 282 réfugiés (au 17 juillet) en Mauritanie, au Burkina Faso et au Niger. Sur le plan de la sécurité alimentaire, 1 396 335 personnes ont besoin d’une assistance alimentaire immédiate et d’ici la fin de l’année et 2 073 162 personnes seront sous pression. 660 000 enfants de moins de 5 ans souffriront de malnutrition aigüe (MAG), dont 210 000 de malnutrition aiguë sévère (MAS) et 450 000 enfants à risque de malnutrition aigüe modérée (MAM).


    0 0

    Source: Assessment Capacities Project
    Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Haiti, India, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Malawi, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Niger, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, World, Yemen, South Sudan (Republic of)
    preview


    In Syria, despite the start of the Holy Month of Ramadan on 9 July, large-scale operations have been ongoing in several major cities, including Damascus, Homs, Aleppo, and Idlib with regime forces pushing to extend the gains obtained over the past weeks with support of the Lebanese Hezbollah fighters. Infighting within opposition forces has escalated in recent days with clashes reported between various Islamist and more moderate groups, notably between Kurdish fighters and al-Qaeda affiliated Islamists near the border with Turkey in Al-Hassakeh governorate. As of 18 July, over 1.8 million Syrian refugees have been registered in neighbouring countries according to the UNHCR.

    In India, the death toll from the floods that hit in Uttarakhand State in mid-June is estimated to be up to 6,000 people as of mid-July. New heavy rains are expected in different parts of India, including in Uttarakhand State. Against this background, some humanitaian organizations are concerned that the affected communities are likely to face acute food insecurity in the coming weeks. Meanwhile, protesters and government troops clashed in Indian-administered Kashmir.

    In South Sudan, inter-tribal fighting coupled with clashes between governement forces and insurgents has been raging in Pibor county in Jonglei state since mid-July amid alleged massive human-rights abuses commited by all beligerants. As reported by humanitarian actors, some 120,000 civilians have been displaced as a result of the recent surge in violence and are in urgent need of assistance. To date, and although aid agencies managed to reach Pibor county for the first time this year last week, access to the area remains severly constrained. Tensions over oil remain ongoing between Juba and Khartoum.

    Updated: 22/07/2013, Next update: 29/07/2013

    Global Emergency Overview web interface


    0 0

    Source: Consortium of International Agricultural Research Centers
    Country: Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana, Mali, Togo
    preview


    According to study, inaction will lead to “major setback” in economic development and food security for the poorest people in Ghana, Burkina Faso and other countries in West Africa

    ACCRA, GHANA (19 July, 2013)—A new study released today finds that so much water may be lost in the Volta River Basin due to climate change that planned hydroelectric projects to boost energy and food production may only tread water in keeping up with actual demand. Some 24 million people in Ghana, Burkina Faso and four other neighboring countries depend on the Volta River and its tributaries as their principal source of water.

    Specifically, the researchers with the International Water Management Institute (IWMI) and their partners concluded that the combined effects of higher temperatures and diminished rain could mean that by the year 2100, all of the current and planned hydroelectric projects in the basin would not even generate as much power as existing facilities do now. Meanwhile, there would only be enough water to meet about a third of irrigation demand.

    IWMI and other centers involved with the CGIAR’s Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) are drawing attention to the Volta study as leaders from across Africa gather in Ghana for Africa Agriculture Science Week 2013, under the theme “Africa Feeding Africa.”

    “An unreliable supply of water for irrigation will have serious consequences for a region where most people are farmers. Beyond that, there is an urgent need to shift more food production away from rain-fed systems that are subject to the vagaries of climate to irrigated agriculture. This study shows that this strategy is not as dependable as we once thought,” said Matthew McCartney, PhD, a principal researcher and hydrologist at IWMI, which is part of CGIAR, an international consortium of agricultural research institutes. McCartney served as lead author for the study, The Water Resource Implications of Changing Climate in the Volta River Basin, along with colleagues from Ghana’s Council for Scientific and Industrial Research and Germany’s Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research.

    Climate models show temperatures in the Volta Basin rising by up to 3.6 degrees Celsius over the next century—which the scientists warn could significantly increase water lost to evaporation. They also indicate average annual rainfall could drop by about 20 percent. McCartney and his colleagues calculated that water flows in the Volta region could fall by 24 percent through 2050 and by 45 percent by 2100, depriving the basin of water that countries are counting on to drive turbines and feed farms.

    “The smart development of water resources is a crucial part of Africa feeding Africa, and we need to understand how climate change might alter water availability in vulnerable regions like the Volta Basin,” said Robert Zougmoré, who leads CCAFS research in West Africa. “This study highlights the need for more innovation and cooperation in the Volta to make sure farmers in the region can adapt to these very challenging conditions caused by global warming.” CCAFS funded the study along with Germany’s Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development.

    The Volta River Basin encompasses 402,000 square kilometers. Most of this area is in Ghana and Burkina Faso, with the remainder in Benin, Côte d’Ivoire, Mali and Togo. The basin’s population is expected to reach 34 million people by 2015, up from 19 million in 2000. Agriculture accounts for 40 percent of the basin’s economic activity. As rains become less and less reliable in a changing climate, researchers and policy-makers have been exploring a shift to groundwater or other types of irrigation. Meanwhile, hydroelectric power plants are seen as crucial to sustaining industrial development and expanding economic opportunities.

    The Volta Basin is already home to the massive Akosombo Dam, which created Lake Volta, the world’s largest man-made lake by surface area, and fourth largest reservoir by volume. Also coming on-line is the controversial Bui Dam project, which is expected to add 400 megawatts of power to Ghana’s strained power grid, along with 30,000 hectares of irrigated farmland. But the study predicts these projects and many others planned for the basin could fall far short of their potential due to climate change.

    For example, it finds that by 2050, there would only be enough water for hydroelectric facilities to perform at about 50 percent of capacity. By the end of the century, there would be only enough to sustain about 25 percent. Irrigation projects would fare better, at least initially. The study finds that if all planned projects are completed, they could double water available for irrigation through 2050. But by 2100, as water losses accumulate, the system would be delivering only slightly more water than irrigation projects provide now, and not nearly enough to meet demand.

    The study shows the loss of water in the basin would be especially challenging for poor farmers in rural areas, where agriculture is the primary provider of food and income. In addition to problems for large-scale irrigation projects, the small-scale irrigation that is common throughout the region would also be affected. The IWMI study warns that groundwater could become harder to utilize, “especially the shallow groundwater” typically used in rural communities.

    McCartney cautioned that the predictions for water resources in the Volta are not absolute. But he said there are enough warning signs in the data that decision-makers need to be thinking of a more resilient mix of options for energy and agriculture to stand up to the climate challenge. For example, the study suggests considering a broader mix of renewable energy sources, including wind and solar. Water storage options should not be confined to projects that employ large dams, the researchers said. Equal consideration should be given to alternative water storage systems.

    For farmers, McCartney said the solutions could include improving groundwater supplies available to rural areas by “recharging” local aquifers with water taken from rivers or reservoirs. This is a practice that is becoming increasingly popular in the water-stressed regions of the world. The study also calls for pursuing relatively simple, small-scale approaches to water storage, such as building small ponds on rural farms and using water tanks with roofs that reduce evaporation.

    “Africa has the potential for innovation and solutions. We need to harness that innovation and combine it with solutions that we know work to feed Africa,” said McCartney. “This week’s conference will feature many of these solutions.”


    0 0

    Source: International Medical Corps
    Country: Chad

    Jaya Vadlamudi
    Senior Communications Officer
    +1 310.826.7800
    jvadlamudi@InternationalMedicalCorps.org

    LOS ANGELES, CA, July 22, 2013 – Malnutrition rates in southern Chad are reaching critical levels, according to International Medical Corps’ assessments in the region. In Aboudeia health district nearly ten percent of girls under age five may be suffering from severe acute malnutrition. As the assessment was conducted at the beginning of Chad’s lean season and malnutrition rates are expected to worsen, International Medical Corps is urging the international community to immediately step up support before affected communities slide further into crisis.

    “These severe acute malnutrition figures are extremely worrying, even for a region that regularly experiences food insecurity,” said Esther Busquet, International Medical Corps Roving Nutrition Advisor for the Sahel. “We are particularly concerned for the health of young girls, who appear to be especially badly affected.”

    Causes of the current hunger crisis in Chad include a poor harvest in 2012, high food prices following increased demand from neighboring Sudan and limited access to nutrition and health services in remote areas. In addition, many people surveyed in the region lack access to clean drinking water, and water-related diseases remain common. Conditions such as diarrhea often contribute to malnutrition rates as sick children struggle to retain vital nutrients in food.

    The screenings conducted at health centers in Aboudeia district found that levels of general acute malnutrition among children under five is 26 percent. The World Health Organization classifies these levels of malnutrition as an emergency. International Medical Corps would like to call attention to this potential large-scale humanitarian crisis and encourage the international community to immediately mobilize resources.

    In the meantime, International Medical Corps continues to work with local health officials, donors and other stakeholders using existing resources to provide critical nutrition and health services to affected populations in Chad. In addition, the organization recognizes that a more integrated and preventive approach is needed to build resilience to malnutrition, addressing all causes, not just the shortages of food. As such, International Medical Corps is working on preventing child malnutrition through promotion of breastfeeding, use of food supplementation and education on proper weaning of children. The organization is also implementing community gardens and community education campaigns to increase knowledge on the root causes of malnutrition. However, these efforts are not enough to stem this growing humanitarian crisis. Given the urgent need that has been identified, International Medical Corps encourages the international community to come together to do more to address the problem.

    For more information, contact: Jaya Vadlamudi, Senior Communications Officer, International Medical Corps +1 310 826 7800 jvadlamudi@InternationalMedicalCorps.org

    Since its inception nearly 30 years ago, International Medical Corps’ mission has been consistent: relieve the suffering of those impacted by war, natural disaster, and disease, by delivering vital health care services that focus on training. This approach of helping people help themselves is critical to returning devastated populations to self-reliance. For more information visit: www.InternationalMedicalCorps.org. Also see us Facebook and follow us on Twitter.


    0 0

    Source: European Union
    Country: Mali

    Conseil Affaires étrangères Bruxelles, 22 juillet 2013

    Le Conseil a adopté les conclusions suivantes:

    1. "L'Union européenne (UE) se félicite de l'engagement pris par les autorités maliennes de tout entreprendre pour garantir le bon déroulement, la crédibilité et la transparence de l'élection présidentielle, dont le premier tour aura lieu le 28 juillet, et des élections législatives qui suivront. Cette élection constituera une avancée majeure dans le processus de plein retour à l'ordre constitutionnel sur l'ensemble du territoire malien. L'UE en appelle à toutes les parties à travers l'ensemble du pays à participer activement à ce processus de manière pacifique et constructive et à assurer la participation la plus large des réfugiés, des personnes déplacées et des Maliens à l'étranger. L'UE encourage à cet effet tous les partis politiques à signer et appliquer le Code de bonne conduite électorale.

    2. A la demande des autorités maliennes, l'UE a commencé de déployer une mission d'observation électorale. Le Conseil souligne l'importance d'assurer dans la mesure du possible une observation dans les régions du nord du Mali, notamment celle de Kidal, et dans les camps de réfugiés.

    3. Il est essentiel que l'accord préliminaire de paix du 18 juin soit mis en œuvre par tous ses signataires, dans toutes ses dispositions et conformément à son calendrier, de manière à permettre la tenue pacifique d'élections dans la région de Kidal grâce au redéploiement progressif des forces de sécurité et de l'administration. L'UE salue les premières mesures de mise en œuvre de l'accord préliminaire de paix, notamment le retour progressif de l’Etat à Kidal et le cantonnement des groupes armés. Elle encourage tous les groupes armés nonterroristes à adhérer à cet accord et à le mettre en œuvre. L'UE continuera d'apporter son plein soutien à ce processus, notamment à travers l'action du Représentant Spécial de l'UE pour le Sahel.


    0 0

    Source: Government of Turkey
    Country: Mauritania, Niger, Senegal, Turkey

    RESUME DE L’OPERATION HUMANITAIRE GUEDIAWAYE SAMEDI 20 JUILLET 2013 LA CROIX ROUGE SENEGALAISE ET LE CROISSANT ROUGE TURC

    Grace à l’opération humanitaire du Croissant Rouge Turc 6.500 tonnes de sucre et 3.500 tonnes de farine seront distribuées aux personnes dans le besoin en Mauritanie, au Niger et au Sénégal avec la coopération de la Croix Rouge Sénégalaise. La Croix Rouge Sénégalaise à commencer à distribuer les 2.000 tonnes de sucre destinés pour le Sénégal depuis le 14 Juillet 2013. Cette donation va permettre d'assister les populations sénégalaises durant cette période de Ramadan, en particulier 66.600 ménages vulnérables ciblés dans les 14 régions et les 45 départements du pays. Une cérémonie officielle a été organisé hier le samedi 20 Juillet 2013 à 11:00 au Centre de Santé de la Croix Rouge à Guédiawaye à 11.00 avec la participation des représentants citées ci-dessous ;

    · Mr. Deniz SAHIN; Chargé d’Affaires de l’Ambassade de Turquie à Dakar,

    · Mr. Faye ; Adjoint au Sous-Préfet du département de Guédiawaye,

    · Mr. Ibrahima Ndiaye ; Le maire de la commune d'arrondissement de Ndiarème Limamou Laye, dans le département de Guédiawaye.

    · Mr. Babacar SOW; Premier vice-président de la Croix-Rouge sénégalaise et Président de la direction régionale de Dakar de la croix rouge sénégalaise

    · Mme Nene GAYE; Présidente de la direction du poste de santé de de la Croix-Rouge à Guédiawaye

    · Mr. Anıl ERTEKIN; Coordinateur du Bureau à Dakar de la TIKA (Agence Turque de Coopération et de Coordination)

    · Mr. Kerim MENEMENCIOGLU; Spécialiste des Programmes Internationaux au Croissant Rouge Turc

    Lors de son intervention le Chargé d’Affaires de l’Ambassade de Turquie à Dakar a souligné les trois points suivant : 1- La particularité de la période choisit, qui est le mois bénis de Ramadan.

    2- La nature de ce don qui est le sucre, qui est une matière première très importante pour les populations

    3- Le choix du pays. Effectivement, le Chargé d’Affaires a souligné que même si le Sénégal n’est pas le pays le plus vulnérable (voir en annexe les Pj-1 et Pj-2) en ce qui concerne la crise alimentaire, les relations bilatérales excellente entre la Turquie (voir en annexe le Pj-3) et le Sénégal engage la Turquie à prendre le Sénégal comme pays prioritaire dans ce genre d’action.

    • Le Chargé d’affaires n’a pas manqué de s’adresser aux personnes attendant l’aide pour leur demander de faire preuve de patience et de collaborer avec les agents de la croix rouge sénégalaise pour leurs faciliter la tâche de distribution de 2000 Tonnes de sucres.

    • Le Chargé d’affaires a aussi expliqué que selon le classement du FMI et de la Banque Mondiale la Turquie est devenue la 16ème plus grande économie du monde et que selon l’OCDE, elle devrait afficher la plus forte croissance économique de tous les pays membres de l’OCDE sur la période 2011-2017, avec un taux de croissance annuel moyen du PIB réel de 6,7 pour cent. La chargé d’Affaires Deniz SAHIN a précisé que plus important que ces statistique, selon le rapport mondial d’aide humanitaire du groupe de recherche le Development Initiatives (DI), son pays La Turquie, a déboursé Plus d'un milliard de dollars, un chiffre qui représente 0,13 % de son revenu national et qui le place au rang du quatrième plus grand donateur en aide humanitaire. (voir en annexe le Pj-4)

    • Enfin le Chargé d’Affaire a expliqué qu’en dehors du don du croissant rouge turc, d’autre ONG turc aussi comme “Kimse yok mu” avec la coopération du groupe scolaire turc yavuz Selim contribue dans ce sens. İl a cité la cérémonie qui a eu lieu récemment le 12 juillet avec la présence du Ministre de l’Elevage et maire de la Ville de Louga Son Excellence Madame Aminata Mbengue Ndiaye. (voir en annexe les Pj-5 et Pj-6)

    · De son côté, le Premier vice-président de la Croix-Rouge sénégalaise Mr. Babacar SOW a remercié la Turquie pour ce don et a souligné que c’est la première fois que la croix rouge sénégalaise reçoit un don de cet ampleur. (40.000 sacs de 50 kg)

    · Mme Nene Gaye, Mr. Faye et Mr. Ibrahima Ndiaye aussi ont salué cette opération humanitaire.


older | 1 | .... | 156 | 157 | (Page 158) | 159 | 160 | .... | 728 | newer