Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

ReliefWeb - Updates

older | 1 | .... | 157 | 158 | (Page 159) | 160 | 161 | .... | 728 | newer

    0 0

    Source: International Crisis Group
    Country: Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    For the first time since 1987, succession is being openly discussed in Burkina Faso. Under the current constitution, President Blaise Compaoré, in power for more than a quarter century, is not allowed to contest the presidency in 2015. Any attempt to amend the constitution for a fifth-term bid could provoke a repeat of the 2011 popular uprisings. However, even if Compaoré abides by the constitution and leaves power in 2015, his succession may still prove challenging as he has dominated the political scene for decades, placing severe restrictions on political space. International partners must encourage him to uphold the constitution and prepare for a smooth, democratic transition.

    Preserving Burkina Faso’s stability is all the more important given that the country is located at the centre of an increasingly troubled region, with the political and military crisis in neighbouring Mali possibly spilling over into Niger, another border country. Burkina Faso has been spared similar upheaval so far thanks to its internal stability and robust security apparatus, but deterioration of the political climate in the run-up to 2015 could make the country more vulnerable. A presidential election is also due in 2015 in Côte d’Ivoire, a country with which Burkina Faso has very close ties. This special relationship and the presence of a significant Burkinabe community in the country mean that a political crisis in Ouagadougou could have a negative impact on a still fragile Côte d’Ivoire.

    Burkina Faso also holds significant diplomatic influence in West Africa. Over the past two decades under Blaise Compaoré’s rule, the country has become a key player in the resolution of regional crises. The president and his men have succeeded, with much ingenuity, in positioning themselves as indispensable mediators or as “watchdogs” helping Western countries monitor the security situation in the Sahel and the Sahara. A crisis in Burkina Faso would not only mean the loss of a key ally and a strategic base for France and the U.S., it would also reduce the capacity of an African country in dealing with regional conflicts. The collapse of the Burkinabe diplomatic apparatus would also mean the loss of an important reference point for West Africa that, despite limitations, has played an essential role as a regulatory authority.

    There is real risk of socio-political crisis in Burkina Faso. Since coming to power in 1987, Blaise Compaoré has put in place a semi-authoritarian regime, combining democratisation with repression, to ensure political stability – something his predecessors have never achieved. This complex, flawed system is unlikely to be sustained, however. It revolves around one man who has dominated political life for over two decades and has left little room for a smooth transition. In fact, there are few alternatives for democratic succession. The opposition is divided and lacks financial capacity and charismatic, experienced leaders; and none of the key figures in the ruling party has emerged as a credible successor. If Compaoré fails to manage his departure effectively, the country could face political upheaval similar to that which rocked Côte d’Ivoire in the 1990s following the death of Félix Houphouët-Boigny.

    Another threat to Burkina Faso’s stability is social explosion. The society has modernised faster than the political system, and urbanisation and globalisation have created high expectations for change from an increasingly young population. Despite strong economic growth, inequalities are widespread and the country is one of the poorest in the world. Repeated promises of change have never been fulfilled, and this has led to broken relations between the state and its citizens as well as a loss of authority at all levels of the administration. Public distrust sparked violent protests in the first half of 2011 that involved various segments of the society, including rank-and-file soldiers in several cities.

    For the first time, the army appeared divided between the elites and the rank and file, and somewhat hostile to the president, who has sought to control the defence and security apparatus from which he had emerged. The crisis was only partially resolved, and local conflicts over land, traditional leadership and workers’ rights increased in 2012. Such tensions are especially worrying given the country’s history of social struggle and revolutionary tendencies since the 1983 Marxist-inspired revolution.

    Blaise Compaoré’s long reign is showing the usual signs of erosion that characterises semi-autocratic rule. Several key figures of his regime have retired, including the mayor of Ouagadougou, Simon Compaoré – not a relative of the president – who managed the country’s capital for seventeen years; and billionaire Oumarou Kanazoé, who until his death was a moderate voice among the Muslim community. In addition, the death of Libya’s Muammar Qadhafi, a major financial partner, was a blow to Compaoré’s regime.

    President Compaoré has responded to these challenges with reforms that have not met popular expectations and have only scratched the surface. Further, he has remained silent on whether he will actually leave office in 2015. He has concentrated power, in the country and within his Congress for Democracy and Progress (CDP) party, in the hands of a small circle of very close allies and family members, including his younger brother François Compaoré, who was elected to parliament for the first time on 2 December 2012. The president’s silence and his brother’s political ascent continue to fuel uncertainty.

    President Compaoré has less than three years left to prepare his departure and prevent a succession battle or a new popular uprising. He is the only actor capable of facilitating a smooth transition. By upholding the constitution and resisting the temptation of dynastic succession, he could preserve stability, the main accomplishment of his long rule. Any other scenario would pave the way for a troubled future. Similarly, the opposition and civil society organisations should act responsibly and work to create conditions for a democratic process that would preserve peace and stability. International partners, in particular Western allies, should no longer focus exclusively on Compaoré’s mediation role and the monitoring of security risks in West Africa; they should also pay close attention to domestic politics and the promotion of democracy in Burkina Faso.

    Dakar/Brussels, 22 July 2013


    0 0

    Source: International Crisis Group
    Country: Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger
    preview


    SYNTHESE

    Pour la première fois depuis 1987, la question de la succession du président burkinabè est ouvertement posée. La Constitution interdit en effet à Blaise Compaoré, au pouvoir depuis plus d’un quart de siècle, de briguer un nouveau mandat en 2015. Sa marge de manœuvre est très étroite. S’il respecte la loi fondamentale, sa succession risque d’être difficile tant il a dominé la vie politique et fermé les possibilités d’alternance. S’il modifie la Constitution et se porte candidat à un cinquième mandat consécutif, il prend le risque de déclencher un soulèvement populaire comme celui qui a fait vaciller son régime au premier semestre de l’année 2011. Les partenaires internationaux doivent l’inciter à respecter la loi fondamentale et permettre une transition démocratique en douceur.

    Préserver la stabilité du Burkina Faso est d’autant plus important que la région ouest-africaine, où le pays occupe une position géographique centrale, vit une période difficile. Le Mali voisin traverse un conflit politico-militaire qui a déjà eu des conséquences graves sur le Niger, autre pays frontalier du Faso. Le Burkina a pour le moment été épargné par cette onde de choc parce que sa situation intérieure reste stable et son appareil de sécurité suffisamment solide, mais une détérioration de son climat politique à l’horizon 2015 le rendrait beaucoup plus vulnérable. Une élection présidentielle doit aussi être organisée cette même année en Côte d’Ivoire, un pays avec lequel le Burkina Faso est intimement lié. Une crise politique à Ouagadougou aurait des répercussions négatives sur une Côte d’Ivoire toujours fragile.

    Cette position géographique centrale se double d’une influence diplomatique majeure. En deux décennies, Blaise Compaoré a fait de son pays un point de passage obligé pour le règlement de la quasi-totalité des crises de la région. Avec une grande habileté, Compaoré et ses hommes ont su se rendre indispensables comme médiateurs ou comme « vigies » permettant à plusieurs puissances occidentales la surveillance sécuritaire de l’espace sahélo-saharien. Une crise au Burkina Faso signifierait d’abord la perte d’un allié important et d’une base stratégique pour la France et les Etats-Unis ainsi qu’une possibilité réduite de déléguer à un pays africain le règlement des conflits régionaux. Pour l’Afrique de l’Ouest, la désorganisation de l’appareil diplomatique burkinabè impliquerait la perte d’un point de référence, d’une sorte d’autorité de régulation qui reste utile malgré de nombreuses limites.

    Le risque qu’une crise politique et sociale survienne au Burkina Faso est réel. Depuis 1987, Blaise Compaoré a construit un régime semi-autoritaire, dans lequel ouverture démocratique et répression cohabitent, qui lui a permis de gagner le pari de la stabilité perdu par tous ses prédécesseurs. Ce système perfectionné comporte néanmoins plusieurs failles et ne survivra probablement pas à l’épreuve du temps. Il s’articule autour d’un seul homme qui a exercé une emprise totale sur le jeu politique pendant plus de deux décennies, laissant peu d’espace pour une transition souple. Les possibilités pour son remplacement démocratique sont en effet peu nombreuses. L’opposition est divisée, sans ressources humaines et financières suffisantes ou trop jeune pour prendre à court terme la relève et aucun des cadres du parti présidentiel ne s’impose comme potentiel successeur incontesté. L’un des premiers risques pour le pays est donc de se retrouver, en cas de départ mal encadré de Blaise Compaoré, face à une situation similaire à celle de la Côte d’Ivoire des années 1990, aspirée par le vide laissé par la mort de Félix Houphouët-Boigny après 33 ans de pouvoir.

    L’explosion sociale est l’autre menace qui pèse sur le Burkina Faso. La société a évolué plus vite que le système politique ne s’adaptait. Le Burkina s’est urbanisé et ouvert au monde avec pour conséquence une demande croissante de changement de la part d’une population majoritairement jeune. Les fruits du développement demeurent très mal partagés dans ce pays à forte croissance mais classé parmi les plus pauvres de la planète. Des changements ont été maintes fois promis sans jamais être réalisés, ce qui a entrainé un divorce entre l’Etat et ses administrés ainsi qu’une perte d’autorité à tous les niveaux. Cette rupture de confiance s’est exprimée lors du premier semestre 2011 par de violentes émeutes qui ont touché plusieurs villes du pays et impliqué de nombreux segments de la société, y compris la base de l’armée.

    « La grande muette » est apparue pour la première fois divisée entre élites et hommes de rang, et en partie hostile à un président qui s’était pourtant employé à contrôler et à organiser une institution dont il est issu. Cette crise sociale n’a été éteinte qu’en apparence et en 2012 les micro-conflits locaux à caractères foncier, coutumier ou portant sur les droits des travailleurs se sont multipliés dans un pays qui a une longue tradition de luttes sociales et de tentations révolutionnaires depuis l’expérience de 1983 inspirée par le marxisme.

    Enfin, le long règne de Blaise Compaoré, si perfectionné fût-il, a connu l’usure inévitable du temps. Plusieurs piliers de son régime ont quitté la scène, à l’image du maire de Ouagadougou, Simon Compaoré, qui a régulé pendant dix-sept ans la capitale, du milliardaire Oumarou Kanazoé, qui a joué un rôle de modérateur au sein de la communauté musulmane, ou du colonel libyen Mouammar Kadhafi qui fournissait une aide financière importante au « pays des hommes intègres ».

    Le président Compaoré a choisi de répondre à tous ces défis en effectuant quelques réformes superficielles qui ne répondent guère aux attentes de la population. Il a aussi opté pour le silence sur sa volonté de quitter le pouvoir en 2015. Il a recentré la direction du pays et de son parti, le Congrès pour la démocratie et le progrès (CDP), autour d’un groupe restreint de fidèles et de membres de sa famille, au premier rang desquels son frère cadet, François Compaoré. Ce silence et la montée en puissance de son frère, élu pour la première fois député le 2 décembre 2012, continuent d’entretenir un lourd climat d’incertitude.

    Le chef de l’Etat burkinabè dispose d’un peu moins de trois ans pour préparer son départ et éviter ainsi une bataille de succession ou une nouvelle fronde populaire. Il lui appartient de faciliter cette transition. C’est d’abord en respectant la Constitution et en ne succombant pas à une tentation dynastique qu’il pourra confirmer la principale réussite de sa longue présidence : la stabilité. Un choix contraire ouvrirait la porte à une période de troubles. De son côté, l’opposition burkinabè et la société civile doivent devenir des forces de proposition et travailler dès maintenant à créer les conditions d’un progrès démocratique compatible avec la paix et de la stabilité. Les partenaires extérieurs, notamment les puissances occidentales, doivent maintenant s’intéresser autant à l’évolution politique interne du Burkina Faso et à la consolidation démocratique qu’au rôle que son président joue dans des médiations politiques et la surveillance sécuritaire des foyers de tensions en Afrique de l’Ouest.

    Dakar/Bruxelles, 22 juillet 2013


    0 0

    Source: International Crisis Group
    Country: Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Mali, Niger
    preview


    Rapport Afrique N°205 | 22 juillet 2013

    SYNTHESE

    Pour la première fois depuis 1987, la question de la succession du président burkinabè est ouvertement posée. La Constitution interdit en effet à Blaise Compaoré, au pouvoir depuis plus d’un quart de siècle, de briguer un nouveau mandat en 2015. Sa marge de manœuvre est très étroite. S’il respecte la loi fondamentale, sa succession risque d’être difficile tant il a dominé la vie politique et fermé les possibilités d’alternance. S’il modifie la Constitution et se porte candidat à un cinquième mandat consécutif, il prend le risque de déclencher un soulèvement populaire comme celui qui a fait vaciller son régime au premier semestre de l’année 2011. Les partenaires internationaux doivent l’inciter à respecter la loi fondamentale et permettre une transition démocratique en douceur.

    Préserver la stabilité du Burkina Faso est d’autant plus important que la région ouest-africaine, où le pays occupe une position géographique centrale, vit une période difficile. Le Mali voisin traverse un conflit politico-militaire qui a déjà eu des conséquences graves sur le Niger, autre pays frontalier du Faso. Le Burkina a pour le moment été épargné par cette onde de choc parce que sa situation intérieure reste stable et son appareil de sécurité suffisamment solide, mais une détérioration de son climat politique à l’horizon 2015 le rendrait beaucoup plus vulnérable. Une élection présidentielle doit aussi être organisée cette même année en Côte d’Ivoire, un pays avec lequel le Burkina Faso est intimement lié. Une crise politique à Ouagadougou aurait des répercussions négatives sur une Côte d’Ivoire toujours fragile.

    Cette position géographique centrale se double d’une influence diplomatique majeure. En deux décennies, Blaise Compaoré a fait de son pays un point de passage obligé pour le règlement de la quasi-totalité des crises de la région. Avec une grande habileté, Compaoré et ses hommes ont su se rendre indispensables comme médiateurs ou comme « vigies » permettant à plusieurs puissances occidentales la surveillance sécuritaire de l’espace sahélo-saharien. Une crise au Burkina Faso signifierait d’abord la perte d’un allié important et d’une base stratégique pour la France et les Etats-Unis ainsi qu’une possibilité réduite de déléguer à un pays africain le règlement des conflits régionaux. Pour l’Afrique de l’Ouest, la désorganisation de l’appareil diplomatique burkinabè impliquerait la perte d’un point de référence, d’une sorte d’autorité de régulation qui reste utile malgré de nombreuses limites.

    Le risque qu’une crise politique et sociale survienne au Burkina Faso est réel. Depuis 1987, Blaise Compaoré a construit un régime semi-autoritaire, dans lequel ouverture démocratique et répression cohabitent, qui lui a permis de gagner le pari de la stabilité perdu par tous ses prédécesseurs. Ce système perfectionné comporte néanmoins plusieurs failles et ne survivra probablement pas à l’épreuve du temps. Il s’articule autour d’un seul homme qui a exercé une emprise totale sur le jeu politique pendant plus de deux décennies, laissant peu d’espace pour une transition souple. Les possibilités pour son remplacement démocratique sont en effet peu nombreuses. L’opposition est divisée, sans ressources humaines et financières suffisantes ou trop jeune pour prendre à court terme la relève et aucun des cadres du parti présidentiel ne s’impose comme potentiel successeur incontesté. L’un des premiers risques pour le pays est donc de se retrouver, en cas de départ mal encadré de Blaise Compaoré, face à une situation similaire à celle de la Côte d’Ivoire des années 1990, aspirée par le vide laissé par la mort de Félix Houphouët-Boigny après 33 ans de pouvoir.

    L’explosion sociale est l’autre menace qui pèse sur le Burkina Faso. La société a évolué plus vite que le système politique ne s’adaptait. Le Burkina s’est urbanisé et ouvert au monde avec pour conséquence une demande croissante de changement de la part d’une population majoritairement jeune. Les fruits du développement demeurent très mal partagés dans ce pays à forte croissance mais classé parmi les plus pauvres de la planète. Des changements ont été maintes fois promis sans jamais être réalisés, ce qui a entrainé un divorce entre l’Etat et ses administrés ainsi qu’une perte d’autorité à tous les niveaux. Cette rupture de confiance s’est exprimée lors du premier semestre 2011 par de violentes émeutes qui ont touché plusieurs villes du pays et impliqué de nombreux segments de la société, y compris la base de l’armée.

    « La grande muette » est apparue pour la première fois divisée entre élites et hommes de rang, et en partie hostile à un président qui s’était pourtant employé à contrôler et à organiser une institution dont il est issu. Cette crise sociale n’a été éteinte qu’en apparence et en 2012 les micro-conflits locaux à caractères foncier, coutumier ou portant sur les droits des travailleurs se sont multipliés dans un pays qui a une longue tradition de luttes sociales et de tentations révolutionnaires depuis l’expérience de 1983 inspirée par le marxisme.

    Enfin, le long règne de Blaise Compaoré, si perfectionné fût-il, a connu l’usure inévitable du temps. Plusieurs piliers de son régime ont quitté la scène, à l’image du maire de Ouagadougou, Simon Compaoré, qui a régulé pendant dix-sept ans la capitale, du milliardaire Oumarou Kanazoé, qui a joué un rôle de modérateur au sein de la communauté musulmane, ou du colonel libyen Mouammar Kadhafi qui fournissait une aide financière importante au « pays des hommes intègres ».

    Le président Compaoré a choisi de répondre à tous ces défis en effectuant quelques réformes superficielles qui ne répondent guère aux attentes de la population. Il a aussi opté pour le silence sur sa volonté de quitter le pouvoir en 2015. Il a recentré la direction du pays et de son parti, le Congrès pour la démocratie et le progrès (CDP), autour d’un groupe restreint de fidèles et de membres de sa famille, au premier rang desquels son frère cadet, François Compaoré. Ce silence et la montée en puissance de son frère, élu pour la première fois député le 2 décembre 2012, continuent d’entretenir un lourd climat d’incertitude.

    Le chef de l’Etat burkinabè dispose d’un peu moins de trois ans pour préparer son départ et éviter ainsi une bataille de succession ou une nouvelle fronde populaire. Il lui appartient de faciliter cette transition. C’est d’abord en respectant la Constitution et en ne succombant pas à une tentation dynastique qu’il pourra confirmer la principale réussite de sa longue présidence : la stabilité. Un choix contraire ouvrirait la porte à une période de troubles. De son côté, l’opposition burkinabè et la société civile doivent devenir des forces de proposition et travailler dès maintenant à créer les conditions d’un progrès démocratique compatible avec la paix et de la stabilité. Les partenaires extérieurs, notamment les puissances occidentales, doivent maintenant s’intéresser autant à l’évolution politique interne du Burkina Faso et à la consolidation démocratique qu’au rôle que son président joue dans des médiations politiques et la surveillance sécuritaire des foyers de tensions en Afrique de l’Ouest.

    Dakar/Bruxelles, 22 juillet 2013


    0 0

    Source: Government of Germany
    Country: Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Germany, Mali, Mauritania, Niger

    19.07.2013 |

    Berlin – The German De­vel­op­ment Ministry will provide another approximately 5 million euros for the Sahel region in order to prevent the pre­carious food situ­a­tion there from turning into a crisis. In a letter to World Food Programme (WFP) Executive Director Ertharin Cousin, German De­vel­op­ment Minister Dirk Niebel today committed 3 million euros for WFP programmes in the Sahel coun­tries.

    Dirk Niebel said, "The situ­a­tion in the Sahel region continues to be pre­carious, and a new famine cannot be ruled out. We all have vivid memories of the hor­ri­ble 2011 drought in the Horn of Africa. Germany already took preventive action in the Sahel region in 2012. We are now continuing that strategy in order to prevent developments from becoming dramatic."

    The BMZ will also provide just under 2 million euros for a food security project in northern Mali. In its bilateral de­vel­op­ment co­op­er­a­tion with Mali, the BMZ pursues large, long-term programmes that address structural issues. The pri­or­i­ty sectors are ag­ri­­cul­­ture and water and sanitation. These activities are making sig­nif­i­cant contributions towards improving the food situ­a­tion in the region.

    The BMZ also supports the World Food Programme with an annual core contribution of some 23 million euros. These funds go, among other things, toward WFP activities in the Sahel coun­tries of Niger, Burkina Faso and Mauritania, and in Cameroon.

    Earlier, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin had drawn attention to the fact that the food situ­a­tion in the Sahel region continued to be very precarious and that many WFP activities were underfunded.


    0 0

    Source: Télécoms Sans Frontières
    Country: Niger

    Après 9 mois de fonctionnement, TSF et ses partenaires visent à pérenniser le système

    Télécoms Sans Frontières (TSF), en coopération avec Vétérinaires Sans Frontières Belgique (VSF-B), le Système d’Information sur les Marchés de Bétail (SIMB) et le Système d’Information sur les Marchés Agricoles (SIMA), a achevé la phase pilote de son projet de développement rural au Niger, mis en œuvre depuis septembre 2012.

    TSF a apporté son soutien au développement du secteur agricole et de l’élevage dans les départements de Bermo, Say et Dakoro grâce à la mise en place d’un système novateur de collecte et de diffusion d’informations. 17 enquêteurs, équipés de Smartphones, transmettent en temps réel via le réseau internet mobile des formulaires contenant le prix de produits alimentaires (mil, maïs, riz, arachide, niébé…) de 16 marchés aux SIMA et SIMB, qui, à leur tour, les diffuseront à la population via les radios locales et le centre IT Cup de Dakoro. Pour ce faire, TSF a spécialement développé une application inédite permettant l’envoi des formulaires par SMS via le réseau GSM, lorsque la connexion Internet mobile ne fonctionne pas.

    Le Niger est un pays principalement rural où l’agriculture représente près de 40% du PIB. L'agriculture est également le secteur économique qui emploie le plus de main d’œuvre (près de 90 % de la population), d’où l’importance de soutenir ce secteur économique majeur.

    TSF aide au développement rural à travers la mise en œuvre d’un système d’échange d’informations sur les marchés agricoles et de bétail via l’utilisation des Smartphones, tout à fait inédit au Niger.

    Le centre communautaire créé par TSF à Dakoro en 2007 joue un rôle essentiel dans le processus de traitement des données provenant des deux systèmes d’information des marchés de bétail (SIMB) et agricole (SIMA).

    Objectifs principaux :• Lutter contre l’insécurité alimentaire au Niger ;• Faciliter la prise de décisions et renforcer le pouvoir de négociation des éleveurs et des producteurs locaux ;• Améliorer l’efficacité des acteurs locaux grâce aux NTIC.

    Objectifs spécifiques:• Transférer des informations collectées par Internet mobile ;• Transférer des informations collectées par SMS en l’absence de réseau internet mobile ;• Traiter instantanément des informations collectées sur des serveurs virtuels ;• Diffusion des dernières informations des marchés via les radios locales.

    Résultats obtenus :• Taux de réussite global de transmission des informations aux SIM : 87% ;• Transmission en temps réel réduisant le délai nécessaire à l’envoi et au traitement des informations ;• Formation de l’ensemble des différents acteurs du projet à l'utilisation des Smartphones, au du système de collecte et de traitement des informations ;• Radiodiffusion bihebdomadaire d’informations actualisées en 4 langues locales.

    Taux de réussite de l'envoi de formulaires

    Dernière phase du projet pilote :

    Lors de leur dernière visite au Niger en juin 2013, les experts TSF ont installé l’application spécifiquement développée pour permettre l’envoi par SMS des formulaires via les Smartphones en l’absence de connexion internet mobile.

    TSF a également formé les enquêteurs, les gestionnaires des serveurs du SIMA et du SIMB et les responsables des radios à l’utilisation de ce système novateur. Ce dernier, fonctionnant donc aussi hors connexion internet mobile, permettrait l'extension éventuelle du projet dans les zones couvertes uniquement par le réseau GSM.

    Perspectives de perennisation du système :

    Télécoms Sans Frontières et les différents partenaires du projet ont conduit une réflexion sur les perspectives du système de diffusion d’informations dans le cadre de futures actions d’urgence et de développement au Niger.

    Suite aux tests effectués par les enquêteurs, l’utilisation des Smartphones a considérablement facilité le travail en milieu rural. Globalement, l’enquête de satisfaction a mis en lumière la pertinence de la création de ce système de diffusion des prix des produits agricoles et du bétail via les radios locales, qui répond à un véritable besoin des populations. 99% des personnes interrogées déclarent trouver les informations diffusées très utiles.

    1 (1)Les partenaires souhaitent poursuivre et étendre le projet à l’ensemble des prix des produits collectés par les SIM ainsi qu’à d’autres régions du Niger. C’est pourquoi cette dernière mission au Niger a également été l’occasion de présenter le système novateur de TSF pour la diffusion d’informations à différents bailleurs de fonds et ONG intéressés par le projet.

    Les conditions climatiques instables, la crise économique ainsi que le manque d’infrastructure NTIC affectent lourdement les producteurs agricoles et les éleveurs nigériens. En l’absence de système efficace de transmission d’informations sur les prix des marchés, les producteurs vendent souvent à perte, ce qui aggrave leur situation financière.

    Grâce à ce réseau, les enquêteurs collectent des informations sur les prix des denrées et les envoient en temps réel aux gestionnaires du réseau, alors qu’auparavant cette manipulation prenait énormément de temps. En novembre 2012, TSF a distribué aux enquêteurs des Smartphones contenant l’application ODK collect ainsi qu’un formulaire adapté à la collecte d’informations. Ils leur permettent de transmettre des informations économiques et techniques essentielles qui seront ensuite diffusées par les radios locales.


    0 0

    Source: UN Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali
    Country: Mali

    La composante Police de la MINUSMA (Mission multidimensionnelle intégrée des Nations Unies pour la Stabilisation au Mali) été sollicitée au début du mois de juin par les représentants du Ministère de la Sécurité intérieure malien pour fournir une assistance à la formation des agents des Forces de Sécurité Intérieure

    Plusieurs projets de formation ont ainsi été mis en place pour répondre aux besoins des forces de l’ordre dans ce climat de période électorale.

    Le volet "Maintien de l'Ordre" a pour objectif la formation, d'ici le 19 juillet 2013, de 720 policiers et cadres du Groupement Mobile de Sécurité qui regroupe les unités de maintien de l'ordre de la police nationale.

    Une formation de formateurs s'est ensuite tenue du 17 au 21 juin à l'Ecole Nationale de Police (ENP) de Bamako pour 25 policiers, gendarmes, gardes nationaux, agents de la Protection Civile auxquels se sont associés 5 membres de la composante Police de la MISMA (Mission internationale de soutien au Mali sous conduite africaine). Cette démarche permet de constituer un réservoir de formateurs susceptibles d’entrainer à leur tour les agents des Forces de Sécurité Intérieure au dispositif de sécurisation du processus électoral.

    La première formation des membres des différentes institutions s'est tenue du 26 au 29 juin à l'ENP de Bamako.

    Deux autres formations ont suivi du 1er au 5 juillet.

    Le contenu du stage couvrait un vaste éventail d’activités de maintien de l’ordre, telles que : - L’usage de la force et des armes - La situation sécuritaire au Mali - La mission de sécurisation par les Forces de Sécurité intérieure pendant le processus électoral - Le Code de déontologie des Forces de Sécurité - La loi électorale et les principales infractions - La sensibilisation aux engins explosifs improvisés - des exercices pratiques simulant la mise en place d'un bureau électoral, avec la participation d'agents électoraux des communes de Bamako

    A ce jour, 625 agents de la Protection Civile, de la Police Nationale et de la Garde Nationale ont été formés. L'objectif est d'en former 1500 d'ici la tenue des élections présidentielles, prévues pour le 28 juillet 2013.


    0 0

    Source: UN Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali
    Country: Mali

    Le Comité de Suivi et d’Evaluation de l’Accord préliminaire à l’élection présidentielle et aux pourparlers inclusifs de paix au Mali a tenu sa première réunion à Bamako, le 22 juillet 2013.

    Cette rencontre intervient un mois après la signature de l’accord de Ouagadougou du 18 juin 2013. Elle a permis aux membres du Comité [le gouvernement de transition du Mali, le Mouvement national pour la Libération de l’Azawad, le Haut Conseil pour l’Unité de l’Azawad, et les parties adhérentes en l’occurrence, le Mouvement Arabe de l’Azawad et la Coordination des Mouvements et Forces Patriotiques de Résistance, des représentants du Médiateur et du Médiateur associé de la CEDEAO, des représentants de la Commission de la CEDEAO, de l’UA, de l’ONU, de l’UE, de l’OCI, de l’Algérie, de la France, de la Mauritanie, du Niger, de la Suisse et du Tchad], de passer en revue les points suivants : les arrangements sécuritaires ; la mise en œuvre de l’Accord notamment les mesures de confiance, la justice et la réconciliation ; et la mobilisation financière et technique. Les membres du Comité de Suivi ont également adopté le règlement intérieur de leur structure.

    Les membres du Comité de Suivi et d’Evaluation se sont engagés à tout mettre en œuvre pour continuer à créer un environnement propice à la tenue de l’élection présidentielle, à l’ouverture des pourparlers de paix et à prendre des dispositions appropriées pour apporter des réponses concrètes aux attentes des populations sur le plan humanitaire, politique, économique, social et culturel.

    En tenant leur première réunion à la veille de l’élection présidentielle, les membres du Comité de Suivi et d’Evaluation ont voulu non seulement maintenir l’esprit de dialogue et de concertation entre les Parties maliennes mais également mettre sur pied une base solide pour la tenue du dialogue inclusif futur, qui devra permettre d’aboutir à une paix globale et à la réconciliation entre les Maliens.

    Le Comité a passé en revue toutes les étapes de mise en œuvre de l’Accord. Il a félicité la Commission Technique Mixte de Sécurité pour les progrès fait dans le cadre de la mise en œuvre du cessez-le-feu, notamment le cantonnement, le retour des forces de défense et de sécurité et le retour de l’administration. Il a examiné les difficultés rencontrées, enregistré les doléances faites par les Parties, et pris acte du retard dans la mise en œuvre des mesures de confiance. A cet effet, le Comité a lancé un appel pressant à toutes les Parties concernées pour accélérer l’application de l’Accord pour que soient respectés les engagements pris, afin de créer un climat propice à la poursuite du dialogue. Il a demandé également à la communauté internationale d’apporter une assistance financière nécessaire à la réalisation harmonieuse des dispositions de l’Accord préliminaire.

    La réunion qui s’est tenue dans un climat de fraternité, caractéristique de la société malienne, permettra des avancées positives pour le bien être du peuple malien. Le Comité a souhaité que ce climat continue, notamment à travers les contacts directs entre les Parties, pour favoriser l’entente et l’opérationnalisation de l’Accord global de paix.

    Fait à Bamako, le 22 juillet 2013

    Déclaration conjointe des Parties Maliennes

    Considérant le contexte politique actuel caractérisé à la fois par l’organisation des élections et la normalisation progressive de la situation sécuritaire dans le pays ;

    Considérant la nécessité de rétablir une paix définitive et une sécurité durable sur la base d’un dialogue national inclusif fondé sur le respect des engagements pris dans l’accord préliminaire à l’élection présidentielle et aux pourparlers inclusifs de paix au Mali,

    les parties maliennes signataires et adhérentes à l’accord préliminaire, à savoir le gouvernement de transition du Mali, le Mouvement National pour la Libération de l’Azawad, le Haut Conseil pour l’Unité de l’Azawad, le Mouvement Arabe de l’Azawad et la Coordination des Mouvements et Forces Patriotiques de Résistance, avec le soutien des autres membres du Comité de Suivi et d’Evaluation:

    •     Lancent un appel à tous les acteurs aux populations maliennes à l’apaisement et à la retenue ;
      
    •     Demandent que tous les maliens s’abstiennent de tout acte ou propos de nature à inciter à la violence, à la haine, et à toute confrontation intercommunautaire ;
      
    •     Encouragent les populations à maintenir un climat favorable au bon déroulement du processus électoral et à donner la chance à la paix, sur la base du dialogue inclusif et dans un objectif de la réconciliation nationale.
      

    Fait à Bamako, le 22 Juillet 2013


    0 0

    Source: World Food Programme, Food and Agriculture Organization
    Country: Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone
    preview


    Key points

    • A wet season overall in West Africa, especially in the Western Sahel, is expected in 2013

    • Locust situation : renewed threat in the Sahel

    • Poor cashew marketing campaign threatens food security of rural population in Guinea Bissau


    0 0

    Source: ReliefWeb, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Gambia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Senegal
    preview


    One of the biggest challenges facing CERF and the entire humanitarian community in 2012 was the severe food insecurity and malnutrition situation in the Sahel. The crisis affected more than 18 million people in eight countries, and 1 million children under age 5 were at risk of malnutrition. Successive droughts, combined with conflict, displacement and cholera outbreaks, further exacerbated the crisis. Since the crisis began in 2011, CERF has allocated more than US$141 million to countries in the Sahel to tackle food insecurity and nutrition needs as well as to address displacement and prevent additional disease outbreaks.


    0 0

    Source: ReliefWeb, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia
    preview


    The 2011 drought in the Horn of Africa left 13.3 million people in need of humanitarian assistance. CERF funds have been used to alleviate the crisis as food insecurity increased due to limited rain fall at the end of 2010. More than US$128 million was allocated to drought-affected persons in Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia in 2011.


    0 0

    Source: ACT Alliance
    Country: Mali

    Tuesday, July 23, 2013 , Paul Jeffrey

    In the heat of the afternoon, Aissata Kantao sits in the shade of a tree in front of her home, the sound of children playing in the sandy street rebounding off the dirt walls that characterise Timbuktu, the city in northern Mali where she grew up. It’s also the city she was forced to flee when Islamist extremists took control and quieted the children, covered the women, and imposed a regime of terror.

    “If the bearded ones found a woman on the street, they’d chase us back inside, telling us women don’t belong in public,” Kantao said, referring to the jihadis who took over the city in 2012. “If you didn’t move fast enough, they’d beat you.”

    The Islamists came to Timbuktu to help a Tuareg separatist group drive out the Malian military. Yet then they took control from the Tuaregs and imposed a brutal form of sharia law. They forced women to cover themselves head to foot, men to grow their beards, banned music and smoking and, initially, closed schools. After a few days, Kantao took her seven children and fled to Bamako, taking five days to make the journey, alternately walking and riding a bus. In the capital, they stayed with her sister.

    Life in Bamako wasn’t easy. Some days there wasn’t enough food for everyone. She and her children longed for their desert home. In May, they came back after French troops intervened and drove the jihadis into the desert. “The north was finally free thanks to France and [President Francois] Hollande, so we came home,” Kantao said.

    Although some of the people displaced by jihadis have begun returning to Timbuktu and other northern cities, the region’s moribund economy has kept the return rate low. Banks are closed after being looted by the jihadis. Many government offices remain abandoned; most civil servants consider the area too insecure to return. Military checkpoints surround the city, and nervous soldiers make many travelers lift their clothing to show they’re not suicide bombers. Most Arab merchants in the market fled the city when the French arrived, and remain fearful that other residents of the city will blame them as collaborators if they return. There’s little cash circulating and few jobs to be found.

    Kantao keeps the hardship in perspective. “There’s no work here, but I’d rather suffer at home than suffer in some faraway place,” she said.

    Many of those who fled the north say they’ll consider returning after national elections, scheduled for July 28, and before the new school year starts in September. Yet many will find their homes and businesses looted by the jihadis and damaged by rains. Finding work will be a major challenge.

    Ancient treasures destroyed

    Tourism had long been a driver of Timbuktu’s economy but tourists had stopped coming even before the 2012 takeover, scared away by kidnappings of foreigners carried out by jihadi groups. The industry is unlikely to rebound soon. Some of what drew foreigners to the fabled city were the tombs of Sufi saints, many of which were decried as idolatrous and smashed by the jihadis. Tourists also came to see ancient manuscripts dating from the Middle Ages when the city was an international centre of learning and scholarship.

    Yet the documents reflected a tolerant and inquisitive character of Islam that the jihadis found blasphemous. They started burning the ancient books, motivating the people of the city to launch a massive underground operation to surreptitiously smuggle them out of the city to safekeeping in Bamako. The documents won’t last long in Bamako’s tropical humidity but until there’s more confidence that the jihadis won’t return to Timbuktu, neither will the ancient books.

    Most discussions of security quickly turn to the future of the French troops. Although their presence in Timbuktu has diminished in favor of Malian soldiers and troops from a United Nations peacekeeping force, the French maintain a major base at Gao and continue their operations against the Islamists throughout northern Mali, aided by intelligence from United States military drones based in neighbouring Niger.

    Hady Mahamane is a women's leader and vice-mayor in Toya, a small village outside Timbuktu where ACT helps villagers combat the threat of desertification. Because of its isolation, the village is much more vulnerable to the jihadis’ possible return.

    “I worry the French will leave someday, because we suffered a lot under the jihadis. We women couldn’t go out without them asking you where you were going and with whom. If they didn’t like your answer they beat you. We argued with them a lot, and my niece got put in jail for arguing. We don’t want them back, and right now it’s the French who are keeping them away,” she said.

    Ridding the city of animosity

    For centuries a meeting point of tribes and cultures in the middle of the desert, Timbuktu has long been the focal point of ethnic conflicts, often between lighter-skinned inhabitants of the north and darker-skinned Africans from the south. The months of rule by the jihadis – for the most part northerners – only exacerbated those tensions. Thus Timbuktu’s frayed social fabric will take some time and effort to reweave, a challenge ACT is helping meet.

    “Timbuktu can’t revive its health without people returning, but for people to return there must be an atmosphere of reconciliation, of people pardoning each other so that we can enjoy the peace,” said Mouna Cisse, coordinator of the Timbuktu office of the Malian Association for the Survival of the Sahel (AMSS), a partner of an ACT member.

    AMSS runs programmes that foster reconciliation, including formal dialogue circles where people of all social groups and ages can publicly discuss the community’s challenges.

    “It’s not an easy task to bring all these groups together, but it’s a challenge we must face for people to return. For they must return. They are Malians. They’ll never feel at home in other countries. We’ve got to make them feel welcome here,” Cisse said.

    In addition to funding reconciliation efforts, ACT is funding programmes that create income-generating opportunities, as well as providing support for schools, and helping female survivors of gender-based violence, whether the violence was from their partners or from the jihadis.

    Defusing the situation

    The post-conflict rehabilitation of northern Mali faces another serious obstacle in the deadly artifacts of war that lie around the countryside. Uncleared land mines and other unexploded ordnance litter the fields around cities and other areas where fighting occurred. Two members of an ACT mine clearance team were dispatched to Timbuktu earlier this year at the invitation of the mayor after children started finding explosives near their homes. Two children died as a result and two were injured, including one amputation.

    “Children see unexploded ordnance and tend to think it’s a toy, so they start banging on it or throwing it,” said Jean-Jacques Maerel, head of mission in Mali for Dan Church Aid, an ACT member.

    Maerel’s team taught Timbuktu’s teachers how to help their students identify and understand the dangers of unexploded ordnance. Not much is known about what unexploded ordnance is where, so one of the priorities for the ACT team will be working with the UN and other agencies to develop accurate maps of risky areas. Beyond that, clearing and disposing of explosives will free up land for more agricultural development.

    Demining is indispensible for rehabilitation and development programmes. “There’s no point in starting an agricultural programme when you still have unexploded ordnance in the fields. But once we’ve cleared the land for people to return and work their fields, and they’re provided with the seeds and tools to do so, then the economy can begin to recover and people can get on with their lives in peace,” Maerel said.


    0 0

    Source: ReliefWeb, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia
    preview


    The 2011 drought in the Horn of Africa left 13.3 million people in need of humanitarian assistance. CERF funds have been used to address the crisis as rainfall levels diminished towards the end of 2010. More than US$128 million was allocated to drought-affected persons in Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia in 2011. In 2012, another $20 million, followed by $21 million in 2013, was allocated to the region – mostly through the Underfunded Emergency window. Since 2011, CERF has disbursed a total of $169.8 million to the Horn of Africa.


    0 0

    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Algeria, Burkina Faso, Mali, Mauritania, Niger

    This is a summary of what was said by the UNHCR spokesperson at today’s Palais des Nations press briefing in Geneva.

    With the first round of Mali’s presidential elections scheduled for this Sunday (July 28th), UNHCR is continuing preparations with the Malian authorities and neighbouring states for out-of-country voting for refugees. Burkina Faso, Mauritania and Niger host some 173,000 Malian refugees who fled their country when conflict erupted in January 2012.

    UNHCR's role in the elections is about caring for the rights of refugees by facilitating their participation and ensuring the voluntariness of the electoral process in a safe environment. Our role is humanitarian and non-political. In June, we conducted formal and informal surveys in major refugee areas through discussion groups. The surveys found that refugees were generally in favour of being included in the elections, that they have good awareness of the situation in Mali, and that some believe the elections will help peace and stability – a fundamental condition for many refugees in deciding whether to return to their country.

    Our teams in Burkina Faso, Niger, and Mauritania have been meeting with refugee communities to clearly explain our role in facilitating participation and respecting neutrality. We have helped transport some election-related materials. However, transportation of sensitive materials, such as voters’ cards or ballots papers, will be the responsibility of the Malian electoral authorities and the countries of asylum.

    Malian authorities visited refugee camps and other sites in Burkina Faso, Mauritania and Niger in June to establish willingness to vote. In total 19,020 refugees have voluntarily registered to take part, out of 73,277 refugees of voting age (18 and above). Names were then verified against the bio-metric civil registry (RAVEC - Recensement Administratif a Vocation d’Etat Civil) which was last updated in 2011 and used to establish the electoral lists. UNHCR is concerned that only a low number of names of refugees interested in voting were found in the registry. In Burkina Faso, and according to Malian registration teams, 876 out of the 3,504 registered refugees were found in the RAVEC; 8,409 out of 11,355 registered refugees in Mauritania, and 932 out 4,161 registered refugees in Niger. In other words, only around half the refugees who have volunteered to take part in the election have so far been found in the registry.

    As concerning, are reports that only a few NINA (Numéro d’Identification nationale) voting cards have so far been provided by Malian authorities to refugees in Burkina Faso, Mauritania and Niger. In Burkina Faso for instance, only 32 NINA cards have at this point reached the Malian representation. The delay in the issuance and distribution of NINA cards is not specific to refugees but is also impacting many Malian citizens within Mali as well as abroad.

    It is important that the Malian authorities quickly make public the voters’ lists and speed distribution of the electoral cards in Burkina Faso, Niger and Mauritania. This is especially important as refugee camps and sites are located in remote areas, where access may become difficult with the rainy season now settling in. The Malian authorities have informed us that they are considering alternatives to allow refugees to vote in case of further delays.

    173,593 Malians have found refuge in neighbouring countries since the beginning of the conflict in January 2012, including 49,975 in Burkina Faso, 48,710 in Niger, 74,907 in Mauritania and 1,500 in Algeria. 353,000 persons are also internally displaced according to our partner the Commission de Mouvement de Population in Mali.

    For more information on this topic, please contact:

    • In Dakar, Helene Caux (Regional) on mobile + 221 77 333 1291

    • In Burkina Faso, Stephane Jaquemet on mobile +226 66 01 42 81

    • In Niger, Karl Steinacker on mobile+ 227 92 19 31 46

    • In Mauritania, Ann Maymann on mobile +222 02 29 39 353

    • In Mali, Sebastien Apatita on mobile + 223 74 20 11 66

    • In Geneva, Adrian Edwards on mobile +41 79 557 9120 Fatoumata Lejeune-Kaba on mobile +41 79 249 34 83


    0 0

    Source: World Food Programme
    Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, India, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Pakistan, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Uganda, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe, South Sudan (Republic of)
    preview


    In focus

    • Due to conflict, ‘Emergency’ (IPC phase 4) levels of food insecurity exists in local areas of South Sudan, Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, South and West Yemen and northern Mali. ‘Crisis’ (IPC phase 3) conditions prevail in parts of Ethiopia, Djibouti and Somalia. The after effects of shocks and instability in Nigeria are contributing to ‘Crisis’ or ‘Stressed’ food security outcomes that will last through the June-September lean season in agropastoral zones of the Sahel. Due to shocks in 2012 and delayed rains, ‘Stressed’ (IPC phase2) food insecurity persists in most of Haiti.

    • The May-June FAO-WFP Syria Crop and Food Security Assessment Mission (CFSAM) estimates that 4 million Syrians are food insecure. Lack of income, high prices and increasing shortages are limiting Syrian household’s ability to access basic staples.

    • As a result of poor rains in parts of Southern Africa, tradable staple food supplies in the region are limited while maize prices are above-average. According to national VAC assessments, some 1.4 million people are at risk of food insecurity in Malawi, May-June 2013 VAC assessments have shown that the food insecure population in Namibia, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe is above the 5 year average. In Namibia, a May WFP assessment showed evidence of high household coping in drought-affected areas.

    • Some 50,000 refugees and returnees have arrived in eastern Chad from Sudan so far this year. New displacement and insecurity in Sudan’s Darfur and in the Central African Republic are undermining livelihoods, and could affect the 2013 crop.

    • The 2013 growing season is underway in east Africa and the Sahel. March to May rains were adequate in most parts of the Greater Horn of Africa, with the exception of the northeastern Ethiopian highlands. Rice availability in Asia remains ample and prospects for the main wheat harvest are favorable in Central Asia.

    • The spread of coffee leaf rust is expected to continue disrupting rural labor markets in Central America during the 2013/2014 season.

    • Insufficient January to May rainfall has led to crop and livestock losses in Bolivia and Ecuador.


    0 0

    Source: Norwegian Refugee Council, Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre
    Country: Nigeria
    preview


    Brutal attacks by the Islamist militant group Boko Haram, including this month’s pre-dawn raid on a boarding school in which members of the group doused a student dormitory in fuel and set it ablaze as children slept, have focused attention on Nigeria’s embattled north-eastern region. Boko Haram’s violence and the heavy-handed counterinsurgency operations against it have triggered significant displacement in recent years, but they constitute only one of many crises that force people to flee their homes. Other causes include recurrent inter-communal conflicts, widespread and serious flooding, and forced evictions.

    Most internally displaced people (IDPs) live with host families, and their needs are neither assessed nor addressed by government or international actors. Those who live in camps receive relief, but they still often lack access to sufficient food, essential household items and health facilities. Most camps and camp-like settings close after a few weeks after displacement takes place, and little is done to help IDPs find durable solutions to their displacement. Protection risks are widespread in areas that suffer conflict and violence, and many people are afraid to return home. Whether their property has been damaged or destroyed by conflict or flooding, many IDPs do not have a home to go back to.
    Figures on displacement are often only available after larger scale crises, but they suggest that violence and disasters caused by natural hazards have forced a staggering number of people to flee their homes. Millions were displaced by flooding in 2012 alone. The full scale and impact of internal displacement in Nigeria are unclear, in part because data collection is poor and inconsistent. These gaps result in an alarming lack of understanding of the country’s displacement dynamics, most notably how people’s vulnerabilities are complicated by multiple cycles of displacement, and lead to response efforts that are fragmented and generally inadequate.

    Progress made in recent years to protect and assist IDPs in Nigeria is encouraging. The country ratified the African Union “Kampala Convention” on internal displacement in May 2012 and rewrote a draft policy on IDPs to incorporate its provisions. One year on, however, the country’s cabinet, the Federal Executive Council, and the National Assembly are still to adopt the policy, or a domestic law to implement the Convention. The absence of such frameworks as a means of clearly defining roles and responsibilities has, and will continue to, hamper humanitarian and development efforts to mitigate the effects of internal displacement. They are also essential to a holistic approach in supporting IDPs’ search for durable solutions, and in preparing for and preventing future displacement.


    0 0

    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Mali

    Press Release: for immediate publication

    BAMAKO, 23 July 2013 – The humanitarian community is raising the alarm on the rates of acute malnutrition in Gao, Northern Mali. Mali’s Ministry of Health and its partners, including UNICEF, have just published the results of a nutrition and mortality survey (SMART methodology), conducted for the first time since the crisis began in this conflict stricken region. The study reveals a dire nutrition crisis, making it extremely difficult for the most vulnerable and children under age five, in particular.

    “The nutrition situation in Gao deserves special attention. Action must be taken now so that children who can be saved are not left to die and so that new cases can be prevented” said Mr. David Gressly,
    Humanitarian Action Coordinator for Mali, during a visit to Gao on July 23.

    According to the survey, the rate of global acute malnutrition (GAM) is 13.5% making it a “serious” nutrition situation by WHO classification. The situation is an even greater source of concern in the Bourem health district where global acute malnutrition (GAM) at 17% exceeds the emergency threshold of 15% set by WHO. During the next six months, 22 730 children will be at risk for acute malnutrition.

    These high malnutrition rates are explained, in part, by the fact that the survey was conducted in May 2013, at the start of the hunger gap season when food supplies run out. In addition, the spike in malaria during the rainy reason has an impact on children’s nutritional status. The negative impact of the conflict on populations’ financial wherewithal is another factor contributing to the severity of the situation. “The lives of many children are in jeopardy. They need immediate assistance,” said Françoise Ackermans,

    UNICEF Representative in Mali. “Treating children suffering from severe acute malnutrition is a priority for UNICEF. We are sparing no effort to assist each child suffering from malnutrition,” she added. This year, more than 108 000 children under age five were admitted to nutrition rehabilitation units around the country with the assistance of the Government of Mali, UNICEF and humanitarian partners.

    The nutrition survey is being conducted at the national level. It will be conducted next in Timbuktu, northern Mali, and is already underway in the south of the country. Results will allow for nutrition trends to be assessed to better evaluate needs and prioritize resource allocation.

    $80 million USD is needed to meet nutritional needs throughout the country. To date, only a quarter of this funding has been secured. As of July 22, the Consolidated Appeal for Mali has mobilized $142 million, 30% of the $476 million sought.

    For additional information, please contact:
    Hector Calderon, Head of Communications, UNICEF Mali, Tel +223 7599 4089, hcalderon@unicef.org;
    Cindy Cao, Public Information and Media Relations Officer, UNICEF Mali, Tel +223 7599 5846 ccao@unicef.org;
    Katy Thiam, Public Information Officer, OCHA Mali, Tel + 223 7599 3497, thiamk@un.org;
    Anouk Desgroseilliers, Humanitarian Affairs Officer – Reports Specialist, OCHA Mali,
    Tel+ 223 7599 5761, desgroseilliers@un.org.


    0 0

    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Mali

    Communiqué de presse : pour diffusion immédiate

    BAMAKO, le 23 juillet 2013 – La communauté humanitaire sonne l’alarme sur les taux de malnutrition aiguë à Gao, au Nord du pays. Le ministère de la Santé du Mali et ses partenaires, dont l’UNICEF, viennent de publier les résultats de l’enquête de nutrition et de mortalité (méthodologie SMART), qui a été menée pour la première fois depuis le début de la crise dans cette région affectée par le conflit. L’étude révèle un état nutritionnel alarmant, rendant la situation extrêmement difficile pour les populations les plus vulnérables, et les enfants de moins de 5 ans en particulier.

    « La situation nutritionnelle à Gao mérite une attention particulière. Il faut agir maintenant pour ne pas laisser mourir des enfants qui auraient pu être sauvés et pour prévenir de nouveaux cas » a déclaré M. David Gressly, Coordonnateur de l’action humanitaire au Mali, lors de sa visite à Gao le 23 juillet.

    Selon l’enquête, la prévalence de la malnutrition aigüe globale (MAG) est de 13,5 pour cent, une situation nutritionnelle «sérieuse» selon la classification de l’OMS. La situation est d’autant plus préoccupante dans le district sanitaire de Bourem où le taux de malnutrition aiguë globale de 17 pour cent dépasse le seuil d’urgence de 15 pour cent fixé par l’OMS. Au cours des six prochains mois, 22 730 enfants seront à risque de malnutrition aiguë.

    Ces taux élevés de malnutrition aigüe s’expliquent, en partie, par le fait que l’enquête ait été menée en mai 2013, au début de la période de soudure au cours de laquelle les vivres viennent à manquer. De plus, avec la saison des pluies, l’augmentation des cas de paludisme ont un impact sur l’état nutritionnel des enfants. Enfin, l’impact négatif du conflit sur les moyens économiques des populations est aussi un facteur qui explique la gravité de la situation.

    « La vie de nombreux enfants est menacée. Ils ont besoin d’une assistance immédiate», a déclaré Françoise Ackermans, Représentante de l'UNICEF au Mali. «Le traitement des enfants souffrant de malnutrition aigüe sévère est une priorité pour l’UNICEF. Nous mettons en oeuvre tous les moyens disponibles pour assister chaque enfant touché par la malnutrition» a-t- elle ajouté. Cette année, plus de 108 000 enfants de moins de cinq ans ont été admis dans les unités de réhabilitation nutritionnelle au niveau national, grâce aux efforts du gouvernement, de l’UNICEF et des partenaires humanitaires.

    L’enquête nutritionnelle se poursuit à l’échelle nationale. Au Nord, elle sera prochainement menée à Tombouctou et elle est déjà en cours dans le Sud du pays. Les résultats permettront d’évaluer les tendances de la situation nutritionnelle pour évaluer les besoins et prioriser l’allocation des ressources.

    Les fonds nécessaires pour répondre aux besoins nutritionnels sur l’ensemble du pays s’élèvent à 80 millions de dollars. A ce jour, seul un quart de ce financement a été sécurisé. En date du 22 juillet, la Procédure d’Appel Consolidé (CAP) pour le Mali a reçu environ 142 millions de dollars, soit 30 pour cent des 476 millions de dollars recherchés.

    Pour plus d’informations, veuillez contacter :
    Hector Calderon, Chef de la Communication, UNICEF Mali, Tel +223 7599 4089, hcalderon@unicef.org;
    Cindy Cao, Chargée de l’information publique et relations media, UNICEF Mali, Tel +223 7599 5846 ccao@unicef.org;
    Katy Thiam, Chargée de l’information publique, OCHA Mali, Tel + 223 7599 3497, thiamk@un.org;
    Anouk Desgroseilliers, Chargée d’affaires humanitaires – Spécialiste des rapports, OCHA Mali, Tel+ 223 7599 5761, desgroseilliers@un.org.


    0 0

    Source: International Peace Institute
    Country: Mali

    Mali is boldly stumbling toward its first presidential election since the March 2012 coup d’état toppled President Amadou Toumani Touré. Official campaign activities are underway, and the interim government has scheduled the first round for July 28. A rising chorus of NGOs, think tanks, analysts, and even a few presidential candidates have called for a postponement as doubts surfaced about Mali’s ability to hold a credible election.

    Yet, the minister of territorial administration (the ministry tasked with organizing the vote) has guaranteed that all necessary conditions will be met. Both the interim president and the UN secretary-general pledge to maintain the July 28 date and call all actors to respect the results, even if the election is “imperfect.”

    The fact that significant obstacles remain to the organization of a presidential election by the proposed date is indisputable. However, field research and interviews with various actors in Bamako and from northern Mali have guided the analysis that the consequences of delaying the election outweigh the benefits. It is also not clear that a brief postponement will resolve the problems the election faces, and it would continue to starve the country from many sources of much needed foreign assistance. Any delay may also contribute to renewed tensions and conflict with Tuareg-led rebel groups in northern Mali (a region they refer to as “Azawad”).

    Key Conclusions

    • Logistical, administrative, and security challenges threaten the July 28 vote, but it is far from certain that a brief delay would resolve these issues.

    • Many Malians are weary of political and economic instability and are eager to move forward through the election of a new president.

    • A government with a claim to legitimacy must make the pressing fiscal decisions that carry significant long-term implications; recent events show that certain interim authorities are trying to expedite large transactions before the end of their term.

    • The US—Mali’s single largest bilateral donor—is legislatively prohibited from delivering most types of aid until a democratic transition occurs. Even though donors pledged €3.25 billion to Mali at a Brussels conference in May, the release of much of these funds is contingent upon a democratic transition.

    • Postponing the election violates the terms of the June agreement between the Malian government and the principle Tuareg-led rebel groups; a delay may lead to increased insecurity and violence in Kidal, which is part of the rebels’ “Azawad” region.

    Analysis

    The upcoming election is rife with obstacles that pose problems to a perfect vote. Distribution of the new biometric voting cards NINA (Numéro d’Identification Nationale) began less than one month before voting day and the cards did not arrive in Kidal until July 11. Putting these cards in the hands of Mali’s 6,877,449 voters remains a monumental task.

    The Malian administration is only now returning to Kidal since posts were abandoned 17 months ago. Certain candidates allege that the government did not establish proper electoral lists in Kidal, which invalidates any national vote. Youth who recently turned 18 are unable to vote because census administrators did not include them on electoral lists. The date of July 28 may encourage low voter turnout since it falls during the holy month of Ramadan and the height of rainy season. In addition, concerns remain about the voting ability of the over 500,000 displaced persons, many living in refugee camps in neighboring countries.

    A botched election may only lead to renewed insecurity, but it is far from certain that a brief delay would solve the litany of challenges outlined above. In addition, most international partners do not wish to continue to support an unelected government. The interim government remains determined to implement the vote on July 28 and international partners have mobilized significant financial and human resources to assist the election. The UNHCR is facilitating the vote of refugees in neighboring countries and the Malian National Assembly adopted modifications to the electoral law N° 06-044 to allow displaced persons to vote.

    Ignoring the obvious bet-hedging by candidates requesting a postponement while simultaneously engaging in campaign activities, most of Mali’s major political parties and candidates accept the date. The timeline is also not a surprise. In January 2013, the Malian government scheduled the election between April and July in the Roadmap for Transition. Though Kidal remains challenging, the president of the Regional Council of Kidal, Hominy Belco Maïga, believes the vote in Kidal will be “difficult, very difficult, but possible.”

    Difficult weather conditions are also not unique to this current vote. Organizers held the 1997, 2002, and 2007 parliamentary elections during the height of rainy season as well. On top of this, Malians elected every president during the peak of hot season. With such widespread significance, attention, and support, it is difficult to imagine that voter turnout will be comparatively lower than in previous presidential elections. Since the first democratic election in 1992, low voter turnout is a characteristic of Malian elections—never surpassing 40 percent (and bottoming out at 20.9 percent). Malians desire to move the country forward and many see elections as a necessary first step. When asked if the population would accept the results of the July election as legitimate, a Gao native replied, “I think so. Malians are tired of the political instability and of the economic situation of the country.”

    Moreover, a recent cabinet reshuffle highlights the urgent need for a legitimate government. According to a leaked note attributed to the International Monetary Fund, the prime minister removed the minister of finance because he resisted approving several dubious transactions that carried significant financial implications. The minister of finance believed that that the interim government lacked sufficient authority and preferred to wait for the installation of the elected government. The prime minister is trying to rush these transactions before the end of his government’s mandate, and many of these deals would benefit senior level politicians and/or their relatives. The minister of finance was replaced by Abdel Kader Konaté, a member of the same political party as the interim prime minister and more likely to yield to political pressure.

    Following the coup d’état, foreign donors suspended or cancelled large amounts of bilateral assistance. After the Roadmap to Transition, some assistance to Mali resumed, but the US—Mali’s single largest bilateral donor—is legislatively prohibited from delivering most types of aid until a democratic transition occurs. Even though donors pledged €3.25 billion to Mali at a Brussels conference in May, the release of much of these funds is contingent upon a democratic transition. This external assistance and aid is necessary to rehabilitate the Malian economy and basic social services in the north.

    Finally, even if delaying the election was wise at one point, postponement is a serious liability after the Preliminary Accord for the Presidential Election and for Inclusive Peace Negotiations in Mali. The Malian government and the two main Tuareg-led rebel groups based in Kidal, the National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad (MNLA) and the High Council for the Unity of Azawad (HCUA), agreed on two major points: (1) conditions to permit the organization of the presidential election and (2) negotiations to establish a definitive peace and determine the administrative status of “Azawad.” The accord specifically cited that the election would take place in July and that the renewed negotiations to resolve the “Azawad” issue would follow 60 days after the installation of the new government. The MNLA/HCUA only agreed to disarm after these definitive talks. Prolonging the time that the MNLA/HCUA maintains weapons may only raise tensions and contribute to further conflict in Kidal. Furthermore, a postponement may cause the MNLA/HCUA to question the commitment of the Malian government to the agreement. An MNLA spokesperson told France 24, “We never said that we will lay down weapons... We are cautious… We are waiting for a legitimate president.”

    The future of Mali seems to hinge on this question of Kidal. Despite the fact that the region contains less than half a percent of Mali’s entire population and the vote is largely symbolic, it is seen as integral for the election. Even if any one candidate won 100 percent of votes in Kidal, it will not significantly affect the overall outcome of the total vote. In reality, emphasis should be placed on parliamentary elections scheduled for November 24, which are much more pertinent and meaningful for the region of Kidal.

    Eric Wulf is the West Africa Analyst at the Center for Advanced Defense Studies.

    Originally Published in the Global Observatory


    0 0

    Source: Voice of America
    Country: Nigeria

    ABUJA — Food prices are soaring in Nigerian cities as Muslims stock up on traditional foods for the evening feasts that follow daily Ramadan fasts.

    In a country where most live in abject poverty, many are paying as much as six times the normal price for many food items.

    But in the country's predominantly Muslim and already impoverished north, where regional instabilities linked to the presence of the Islamist rebel group Boko Haram are ongoing, soaring costs have left many especially vulnerable.

    Outside a market in Kaduna, one shopper says holiday season's increased prices have further impoverished many, as sellers know that customers are willing to pay higher prices in order to make particular preparations for Ramadan feasts.

    “They feel that people are in need of these products so they inflate the prices," one shopper said. "It is very, very obvious. ... For example, when you want to buy fruit like your pineapples or your oranges and your things for breaking the fast, you see people inflating the prices.”

    But some sellers say the increased prices reflect inflated costs that farmers charge during the holy month.

    In Abuja's Utako market, fruit peddler Umar Mohammad says that he pays about 30 percent more per watermelon during Ramadan, forcing him to increase prices in order to make a profit.

    "[I do] not blame the farmers for hiking prices at the only time of year people will pay more," he said. "Most of them are desperately poor."

    Regardless of who is responsible for the increased prices, Khalid Aliyu Abubakar, secretary general of the Nigerian Islamic umbrella organization Jama'atu Nasril Islam, says northern residents can't withstand the pressure of increased poverty amid the ongoing insurrection.

    “It is unbecoming when somebody utilizes the opportunity to suck the blood of the common poor people," he said. "Therefore let the prices go down."

    James Sako, Kaduna state marketers’ union vice chairman, agrees, explaining that price spikes amid the Islamic holidays only aggravate the local tensions that too often fall along religious boundaries.

    Last summer, for example, more than 100 people were killed in Kaduna city after three churches were razed, sparking violence between Christian and Muslim youth. While most northerners are Muslim and southerners Christian, Nigerians of both faiths live side by side in every city.

    "Both the Christians and the Muslims go to the same markets," Sako said. "When a customer buys something [and] he knows that the price has been skyrocketed, he will buy it with grudges."

    Two weeks into the month of Ramadan, with the yearly urban price surge in full swing, some shoppers take solace in humor, joking that they might be better off living in a village, eating what they grow because of their money’s diminished market value.

    But for too many others, the inflated prices are no laughing matter.


    0 0

    Source: Télécoms Sans Frontières
    Country: Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger

    Dans la région du Sahel les conditions sécuritaires se sont largement dégradées depuis l’arrivée massive de réfugiés maliens dans les pays limitrophes en mars 2012. Les populations affectées ont fui le Mali touché par le conflit entre le mouvement rebelle et l’armée régulière. Selon l’Office du Haut-Commissaire des Nations Unies pour les Réfugiés (UNHCR), on compte environ 353 400 personnes déplacées à l'intérieur du Mali et près de 175 000 réfugiés maliens dans les pays voisins.

    Afin de renforcer l’aide apportée à ces populations vulnérables, TSF fournit des communications satellites haut débit, fiables et rapides pour une meilleure coordination des organisations sur le terrain. Après avoir connecté les camps de réfugiés d’Abala (Niger), de Gorom-Gorom et de Djibo (Burkina Faso), ainsi que celui de Banibangou (Niger) – connexion suspendue en septembre 2012, TSF connecte un nouveau camp, à Mangaizé.

    Selon les données de l’UNHCR, il y a près de 7 845 réfugiés dans le camp de Mangaizé au sud-est du Niger dont 2 016 familles. Le 1 juillet 2013, l’équipe TSF a installé une antenne satellite fixe VSAT dans les bureaux de coordination d’Islamic Relief opérant sur place. Ce hub humanitaire offre une connexion haut débit sécurisée via Wifi aux dizaines de travailleurs membres des ONG et agences des Nations Unies qui nécessitent une connexion quotidienne pour une gestion et une coordination plus efficaces de l’information.

    Par ailleurs, suite à une recrudescence des activités humanitaires dans la zone, le 4 juin 2013 la connexion de Banibangou a été réactivée. L’antenne satellite VSAT installée par TSF dans les locaux de l’organisation CARE International soutient les actions des ONG VSF, Oxfam, Karkara, de la mairie de Banibangou.

    Les localités nigériennes de Mangaizé et de Banibangou situées à quelques kilomètres seulement des frontières du Mali ont fait face à l’arrivée massive de réfugiés fuyant le conflit. Une telle augmentation du nombre de réfugiés dans le camp provoque une contrainte supplémentaire pour la gestion de ressources alimentaires au bénéfice de la population. Les connexions fournies par TSF permettent aux organisations humanitaires d’avoir un accès rapide à des informations fiables pour une réponse efficace et adaptée aux besoins des bénéficiaires.

    Etant donné les contextes sécuritaires extrêmement complexes au Sahel, TSF utilise à la fois des dispositifs satellites fixes pour connecter les hubs humanitaires, et mobiles pour connecter les équipes lors de leurs déplacements.

    TSF AU NIGER

    • Camp de réfugiés d’Abala, à 400 km de Gao :

    Le 24 avril 2012, TSF a installé une antenne satellite fixe Vsat dans le bureau de coordination ACTED et UNHCR au sein du camp d’Abala accueillant à présent près de 15 000 réfugiés. Le hub humanitaire offre une connexion Wifi sécurisée aux 30 travailleurs humanitaires qui viennent se connecter quotidiennement : MSF Suisse, MSF France, CARE International, Islamic Relief, CADEV, HELP, VSF Belgique, ACTED et UNHCR…

    Les 138 Go échangés depuis le hub humanitaire TSF permettent une gestion de l’information plus efficace au quotidien et une réponse coordonnée de tous les acteurs sur zone.

    Témoignages :

    Camp Manager Assistant/ACTED : Avec les problèmes constatés sur le réseau local, sans TSF il nous aurait été impossible de communiquer nos rapports avec le bureau de Niamey et les partenaires. Grâce au dispositif TSF, la communication continue est assurée, tout comme la qualité de la coordination.

    Responsable Information et Communication/ACTED : La connexion TSF au camp d’Abala est un soutien essentiel dans la mise en œuvre et le développement de notre projet, surtout dans une région où la télécommunication est si peu développée. La connexion est également très importante pour toutes les agences intervenant dans la zone ! C’est en effet le seul moyen de communiquer lorsque le réseau GSM est indisponible. Les coupures peuvent parfois durer deux jours.

    • Banibangou :

    Suite à une recrudescence des activités humanitaires dans la zone, le 4 juin 2013 la connexion de Banibangou a été réactivée. A ce jour, 9 Go ont été consommés. Entre le 13 juin et le 17 septembre 2012, l’antenne satellite Vsat installée par TSF dans les locaux de l’organisation CARE International a soutenu les actions des ONG VSF, Oxfam, Karkara, de la mairie de Banibangou, de la préfecture et de la radio RFI Hausa. Cette localité située à quelques kilomètres seulement de la frontière malienne a fait face pendant plusieurs mois à l’arrivée massive de réfugiés fuyant l’insécurité au Mali. Cette augmentation de la population a engendré une pression supplémentaire sur les ressources alimentaires déjà insuffisantes dans la région.

    Les organismes humanitaires ont utilisé la connexion TSF pour évaluer et suivre l’évolution des conditions de vie critiques des réfugiés. Les services télécoms offerts par TSF leur ont permis d’accéder à des données fiables et de qualité pour une prise de décision rapide et une réponse adéquate.

    • Région de Tillia :

    Entre le 10 juillet et le 6 novembre 2012, TSF a fournit un Bgan et un routeur Wifi à Action Contre le Faim Espagne (ACF-E) pour ses activités de lutte contre la malnutrition et l’insécurité alimentaire. La connexion satellite de TSF a permis à ACF-E de mettre en place, en collaboration avec l’ONG locale Hed Tamat, des mécanismes d’aide humanitaire d’urgence, notamment pour l’accès à l’eau potable et les infrastructures sanitaires.

    L’insécurité permanente dans cette région proche de la frontière malienne est une contrainte majeure à l’acheminement de l’aide d’urgence dans les zones affectées. Les équipements satellites de TSF ont permis aux équipes d’ACF-E de rester en contact permanent avec leur siège lors de leurs missions d’évaluation de la situation alimentaire et de la prévalence de la malnutrition dans la zone. Plus de 145 Mo ont été utilisés pour ces communications d’urgence.

    Dans la région de Tillia, la situation a par moments été très critique. Il était alors essentiel de renforcer la résilience des populations maliennes réfugiées afin de faire face à la précarité de leurs conditions de vie. La plupart des réfugiés viennaient de régions pastorales et agricoles du Mali, et attendaient de pouvoir rentrer pour commencer les récoltes avant la saison des pluies et s’occuper de leurs troupeaux qui représentent leur unique moyen de subsistance. Les combats au Mali ont empêché ces populations de quitter le Niger, où leur survie dépendait directement de l’aide humanitaire.

    • Nord Dakoro :

    Entre le 5 juin et le 28 septembre 2012, les connexions satellites Bgan et IsatPhone Pro ainsi que les ordinateurs portables fournis par TSF à Vétérinaires Sans Frontières Belgique (VSF-B), ont permis aux équipes mobiles de rester en communication avec leur siège lors de missions prolongées dans des zones isolées et souvent très dangereuses.

    Les données essentielles collectées sur la situation alimentaire dans les villages reculés ont ainsi été rapidement transférées et analysées pour la mise en place d’interventions nutritionnelles plus efficaces. Plus de 103 Mo ont été échangés entre ces équipes et leur siège. Le téléphone satellite leur a également permis de passer plus de 17 heures d’appels prioritaires.

    TSF AU BURKINA FASO

    • Camp de réfugiés de Gorom-Gorom, à 200 km de Gao :

    L’installation de la connexion satellite Vsat par TSF le 11 juillet 2012 dans les locaux de Vétérinaires Sans Frontières Belgique (VSF-B) à Gorom-Gorom, au nord-est du Burkina Faso, a permis aux ONG et agences des Nations Unies travaillant dans la zone d’échanger 69 Go de données.

    La connexion bénéficie notamment à VSF-B, A2N, UNHCR, la Croix Rouge burkinabé, Save the Children, HELP, AEC, TASSATH, Afrique Verte et AGED. Les services étatiques de la Direction provinciale de la Santé Publique et la Direction provinciale de la Solidarité Nationale fréquentent également le hub humanitaire très régulièrement.

    Avant l’intervention de TSF, les organisations de la zone étaient forcées de parcourir chaque semaine les 57km qui séparent Gorom-Gorom de Dori, chef-lieu du département, pour trouver un accès à Internet correct. Depuis, la connexion TSF améliore la mise en œuvre des activités d’urgence qui, depuis mai 2012, se sont intensifiées, et facilite la communication entre le terrain et les services centraux aux niveaux national et international.

    • Camp de Djibo, à 330 km de Tombouctou :

    Entre le 19 juillet 2012 et le 20 mars 2013, la connexion satellite de TSF dans les bureaux de l’Office du Haut-Commissaire des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés (UNHCR) a renforcé les actions de toutes les ONG de la zone auprès des réfugiés dans les camps au nord de Djibo, où vivaient plus de 15 000 personnes. 79 Go de données ont été échangés.

    Avant l'intervention de TSF dans la région de Gorom-Gorom, à quelques kilomètres de la frontière malienne, le réseau mobile fonctionnait mais l’accès à Internet se faisait uniquement par réseau Edge ou clé 3G, la connexion était donc très lente et peu fiable.

    Les conditions de sécurité précaires rendent les interventions humanitaires d’urgence difficiles et mettent en péril la survie des populations déjà très vulnérables. Les moyens de communication satellite de TSF permettent une meilleure coordination des équipes terrain et améliorent ainsi leurs actions auprès des populations du Sahel.


older | 1 | .... | 157 | 158 | (Page 159) | 160 | 161 | .... | 728 | newer