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ReliefWeb - Updates

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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, South Sudan, Sudan

    HIGHLIGHTS

    • 3,788 Refugees relocated from Yida to Pamir camp as of 30th November

    • 33,72 Refugees and IDPs received material assistance from UNHCR across South Sudan

    • 198 Refugees have been relocated from Juba to Ajuong Thok. Refugees fled violence and conflict which erupted in the Greater Equatoria region after July

    • 448 Refugees, IDPs and host communities involved in various protection training from UNHCR

    Population of concern

    • A total of 1.7 million IDPs

    • A total of 261,541 refugees

    Funding

    • USD 275,668,213 requested for comprehensive needs in 2016

    • USD 132,611,215 needed for top priority activities in 2016


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    Source: World Food Programme
    Country: Nigeria

    Responding to Nigeria Emergency

    Partners have sent medicines, medical kits, tarpaulins, water tanks, generators, prefabricated warehouses, and vehicles to Abuja, Lagos, and Maiduguri.

    For information about stocks available through UNHRD’s Loan and Borrow facility, please visit www.unhrd.org or contact unhrd.customerservice@wfp.org.


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    Source: Small Arms Survey
    Country: South Sudan, Sudan

    I. Introduction and key findings

    Since the beginning of South Sudan’s civil war in December 2013, Unity has experienced more violence and upheaval than any other state in the fledgling nation.1 By the end of 2015, the number of people accommodated in the protection of civilians (PoC) site of inside the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) in Rubkona had swelled to 140,000. This population was by far the largest in any single UNMISS base, representing more than two-thirds of 220,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs) who were taking shelter in UNMISS bases (IOM, 2015b). If the deserted streets of Bentiu, the ruined capital of Unity, are any indication, the peace agreement—signed by the South Sudanese president, Salva Kiir Mayardit, and the head of the Sudan People’s Liberation Movementin-Opposition (SPLM–IO),2 Riek Machar Teny, and ratified on 10 September 2015—has had little effect on conflict dynamics in the state. Indeed, it is sobering to note that the ratification of the agreement, and subsequent negotiations over the Transitional Government of National Unity (TGoNU), resulted in no noticeable shift in the way the Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) has conducted the war in Unity state.

    This Working Paper surveys the first two years of the South Sudanese civil war in Unity and analyses its underlying conflict dynamics. With only minor variations, the front lines remained relatively fixed during this period. The two Padang Dinka counties of Abiemnom and Pariang have remained under the control of the SPLA, reflecting the loyalty of the riverine Dinka to the Government of the Republic of South Sudan (GRSS) and their difficulty in finding a place in the country’s only majority-Nuer state (see Map 1).3 The front line between the belligerent parties has largely run west to east, south of the state capital, through Guit and Rubkona counties. Most of Mayom, home to the Bul Nuer, the only Nuer section that has largely supported Juba throughout this conflict, has generally been under government control.

    The worst abuses of the civil war have been carried out in the southern counties of Unity—Koch, Leer, Mayendit, and Panyijar. Leer, Machar’s home town, has been attacked repeatedly, as government-aligned forces have twice undertaken dry-season offensives (in January–February 2014 and May–June 2015) against the Nuer south, the wellspring of SPLM–IO support in the state. UN sources estimate that more than 10,000 civilians died in Unity between late 2014 and late 2015, a period covering the government’s 2015 campaign but not its 2014 offensive (UNDHCSS, 2016, pp. 6, 22). During the 2015 offensive, the SPLA and aligned groups swept south, razing villages, raping women, and leaving more than 100,000 displaced. By November 2015, following the offensive, the total number of IDPs had risen to nearly 560,000, or 90 per cent of the state’s population. Unity thus became the South Sudanese state with both the highest number and the highest proportion of IDPs (OCHA, 2015a; 2016). In addition, people who sought refuge in Sudan may number in the tens of thousands, including Sudanese refugees who chose to return to conflict areas in South Kordofan and Darfur. In October 2016, approximately 100,000 refugees from South Kordofan were still living in Unity state, trapped between two war zones.

    Download the report A State of Disunity: Conflict Dynamics in Unity State, 2013–15 (HSBA Working Paper 42) by Joshua Craze and Jérôme Tubiana with Claudio Gramizzi


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    Source: World Vision
    Country: Iraq, Nigeria, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World

    BRUSSELS, 16 December 2016 - As EU leaders are discussing migration within the Council arena, World Vision is calling on them to protect children on the move from all forms of violence. UNICEF estimated that 50 million children are affected by migration globally. According to UNHCR, over half of the world’s 60 million refugees in 2015 were children, representing the highest ratio of minors in the global refugee population.

    Behind all these numbers are individual children who are often subject to violence and exploitation.

    “All children on the move, from Mosul and Aleppo, to South Sudan and Nigeria, need protection – regardless of their migratory status. They cannot go unheard or unnoticed,” says Raphael Ruppacher, World Vision Brussels’ Migration Policy Officer. “World Vision is particularly worried about the situation of exploitation that many unaccompanied or separated children find themselves in. The protection and the best interest of the child must always be at the heart of EU leaders’ concerns”

    Around the world and in Europe, children on the move are increasingly subject to immigration detention. Detaining children, with or without their families, can have long-lasting psychological consequences for children and is never in their best interest. Also in the European Union, immigration detention of children is not forbidden.

    “As we observe International Migrants Day this Sunday, we need to admit that the EU still has much to deliver for children on the move. Too often they fall outside of the EU and their Member States’ sight and priority to prevent and reduce migration. Now, more than ever, the EU and its Member States need to step up actions to ensure that children on the move are fully protected,” says Justin Byworth, World Vision Brussels’ Executive Director.

    World Vision works with children on the move around the world, from refugee camps in Lebanon to projects in Central America and towns in Germany. Besides providing shelter and basic services, World Vision also sets up Child Friendly Spaces. In the course of 2015 and 2016, World Vision also responded to the situation on the Western Balkans route with a specific focus on child protection.

    ENDS

    Notes to editors

    World Vision is a Christian relief, development and advocacy organisation dedicated to working with children, families and communities worldwide to reach their full potential by tackling the causes of poverty and injustice. It works in close to 100 countries in most regions of the world including Latin America and the Caribbean, Europe, Africa, the Middle East and the Asia Pacific Region.

    World Vision Brussels’ office represents World Vision members in 12 European countries, including 10 EU member states, as well as the wider international World Vision partnership.

    For more information or an interview, please contact Ludovic Wahis, Policy and Communications Officer, World Vision Brussels & EU Representation, +32 (0) 2 274 18 67, Ludovic_Wahis@wvi.org


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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network, World Food Programme, Government of the Republic of Mali, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Food Security Cluster
    Country: Mali

    1.1. Contexte Situé au cœur de l’Afrique de l’Ouest le Mali est un pays sahélien, enclavé qui s’étend sur une superficie de 1.241.238 Km21. Plus des deux tiers de ce vaste territoire est désertique dans sa partie nord. Sa population est estimée à 18.343.002 millions d’habitants2. Il est divisé en 10 régions administratives subdivisées en 57 cercles et le District de Bamako. Ce vaste territoire est reparti en 703 communes dont les 6 du District de Bamako assimilées dans cette enquête à des cercles au regard de leur taille. Il est classé au 182ème rang sur 186 pays selon l’indice de développement humain (IDH) de 20133.

    NB : Les nouvelles régions de Ménaka et Taoudéni restent dans la base comme elles étaient lors des passages précédents pour faciliter les comparaisons.

    L’économie est fortement dépendante du secteur primaire : l’agriculture, l’élevage, la pêche et l’exploitation forestière occupant 68.0% de la population active4. Ce secteur est lui-même tributaire de facteurs exogènes, principalement d’ordre climatique tels que les sécheresses récurrentes, les inondations et de la précarité des capacités techniques et économiques des producteurs.
    Ainsi, malgré les énormes potentialités agricoles dont dispose le pays, une proportion non négligeable de la population n’arrive pas à couvrir ses besoins alimentaires de façon satisfaisante. La production agricole est assez souvent déficitaire et peu diversifiée. Le pays est structurellement vulnérable à l’insécurité alimentaire et à la malnutrition.

    Les conditions de vie dans le pays continuent de subir l’impact négatif de la situation sécuritaire instable et des effets des aléas climatiques principalement dans les régions nord du pays. Les ménages maliens, déjà fortement affectés par une série de crises5 ont ainsi fait face à d’importantes pertes au niveau des moyens de subsistance (bétail, récoltes, sources de revenus, emploi, réduction des activités économiques, etc.). La mise en œuvre de diverses interventions dans le cadre du Plan National de Réponse du Gouvernement en collaboration avec les agences humanitaires principalement dans le nord du pays a contribué à une stabilisation voire une amélioration de la sécurité alimentaire selon les résultats de l’ENSAN réalisée en février 2016 par le SAP, le PAM, la FAO, le FEWS NET et leurs partenaires. Il n’en demeure pas moins que les ménages restent globalement vulnérables et peu résilients face aux chocs.

    Dans ce contexte, un suivi régulier de l’insécurité alimentaire et nutritionnelle, de l’évolution des moyens de subsistance et des stratégies de survie des ménages est indispensable pour une meilleure (re-) définition et planification des interventions ou activités à mener en vue d’améliorer les conditions de vie des groupes les plus vulnérables et/ou prévenir d’éventuelles catastrophes/crises.


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Mali

    CONTEXTE

    La situation sécuritaire reste relativement calme. Cependant, sur le plan politique on assiste à des avancées notoires : la reprise des activités de supervision pour s’assurer du bon fonctionnement de l’école par les services des Centres d’Animation Pédagogique (CAP) de Kidal et de Tessalit, des missions de supervisons par des services techniques de l’Etat dans la région, la distribution alimentaire gratuite dans les onze communes de la région par IEDA /PAM, le lancement de l’année académique 2016-2017 par le gouverneur. Par ailleurs, il faut noter quelques points de blocages persistent quant à la poursuite de l’assistance humanitaire : le retard dans l’installation des autorités intérimaires, l’opérationnalisation du MOC, le redéploiement des agents des services sociaux de base (éducation, santé, hydraulique).

    MESSAGES CLÉS

    1. Favoriser le déploiement des MOC2 à Kidal car cela impactera considérablement sur l’action humanitaire (utilisation aérodrome) et la coordination (installation des autorités intérimaires).

    2. Organiser des missions spécifiques (Agences UN, Clusters leads, missions conjointes) pour renforcer les capacités des acteurs locaux, renforcer la mise en œuvre de l’action humanitaire dans tous les secteurs, avec une priorité sur l’accès à l’eau, la santé et à l’éducation.

    3. Poursuivre le plaidoyer pour le redéploiement de tous les services sociaux de base : santé, éducation et l’hydraulique en priorité.


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    Source: World Vision, International Research Institute for Climate and Society
    Country: Ethiopia, Pakistan, Somalia, Sri Lanka, World, Zambia

    Executive Summary

    During the Horn of Africa famine in 2011, agencies, donors and the international community failed to prepare and respond early enough to prevent massive suffering. 1 Retrospective analysis found that climate information, such as forecasts for below-average rainfall and measurements of below average vegetation, coupled with analyses of socioeconomic conditions, could have been used to catalyse early action (EA) before the drought occurred. 2 This underscores the need for timely information and the need for appropriate action that could save lives and livelihoods before a crisis.
    With the increase in frequency of disasters, there is a need to improve early warning systems (EWS) for EA to reduce the risks faced by children and their families. As a consequence, the term early warning, early action (EWEA) has become increasingly common among those responding to slow-onset disasters.

    Effective EWS are one that catalyses action early, yet the main challenge to building an effective EWS is the lack of strong evidence as to what information leads to action.

    Climate information is critical and pervasive in EWS. Numerous types of climate data exist, such as forecasts, predictions, outlooks, projections and scenarios (Mason et al. 2015). The three main characteristics of each are: timescale; lead time and target period, but reliable historical data is necessary to establish ‘normal’ conditions, which are then used to assess the magnitude of events relative to ‘normal’. How climate information is then used is important when considering the influence it has on action and decisionmaking.

    Climate-related, sector-specific EWS are driven by both the availability of forecasts that allow sufficient lead time for appropriate action (such as distributing bed nets to prevent malaria, as a result of high rainfall) and the confidence in the forecast.

    Evaluating the socio-economic impact of action is challenging and can lead to inconclusive results. 3 Quantifying the impact of action based on a forecast when no disaster occurs is challenging and remains a key barrier to evaluating impact. As a result, some agencies have adopted a ‘no regrets’ approach to taking actions based on uncertain climate information. No-regrets action increases resilience, and this is the basis for ‘sustainable growth in a world of multiple hazards’. 4 Case study analysis has identified both opportunities and challenges including the development of effective, holistic EWS, setting up EA funding/ contingency funding with clear trigger mechanisms, effective information partnerships, understanding forecasts, evaluating impacts and action planning.
    World Vision’s approach includes three key components:

    1. collection and analysis of EW data;

    2. translation of EW data into EA through information management and clearly defined decision-making, systems and procedures at each level; and

    3. recommendations for EA.


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    Source: UN Children's Fund, Nutrition Cluster
    Country: Nigeria


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    Source: UN Children's Fund, Nutrition Cluster
    Country: Nigeria


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    Source: UN Children's Fund, Nutrition Cluster
    Country: Nigeria


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    Source: UN Children's Fund, Nutrition Cluster
    Country: Nigeria


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    Source: UN Children's Fund, Nutrition Cluster
    Country: Nigeria


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    Source: UN Children's Fund, Nutrition Cluster
    Country: Nigeria


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    Source: UN Children's Fund, Nutrition Cluster
    Country: Nigeria


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    Source: UN Children's Fund, Nutrition Cluster
    Country: Nigeria


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    Source: UN Children's Fund, Nutrition Cluster
    Country: Nigeria


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    Source: UN Children's Fund, Nutrition Cluster
    Country: Nigeria


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    Source: UN Children's Fund, Nutrition Cluster
    Country: Nigeria


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    Source: UN Children's Fund, Nutrition Cluster
    Country: Nigeria


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    Source: UN Children's Fund, Nutrition Cluster
    Country: Nigeria


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