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ReliefWeb - Updates

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    0 0

    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Burkina Faso, Mali, Mauritania, Niger

    106.7 M required for 2016 33.3 M contributions received, representing 31% of requirements 73.4 M funding gap for the Mali Situation


    0 0

    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Central African Republic, Chad, Mali, Niger, Nigeria

    CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

    VIOLENCE CONTINUES TO IMPEDE ACCESS

    Violence remains one of the major impediments to humanitarian access in many areas, in spite of a decrease in the number of incidents since the start of the year. So far in September, there have been 15 attacks against aid workers, including break-ins into premises of aid organizations. In August, 34 incidents of insecurity were reported throughout the country, a third of which targeted humanitarian workers.

    MONKEYPOX ERUPTS IN SOUTHERN REGION

    Monkeypox has erupted in four villages in the southern Basse-Kotto prefecture. The first case was registered on 17 August. As of 15 September, 14 cases and one death had been reported. Patients are being treated at a local health centre as well as the district hospital. Health sector partners are supporting the Government in conducting public sensitization, strengthening health services and providing medical supplies among other containment measures.

    CHAD

    6,000 AT RISK AS FLOODS DESTROY CROPS

    The destruction of some 2,200 hectares of crops by flooding in August has affected more than 1,100 households (around 6,000 people) in the southern Salamat region. Those affected will be forced to rely on off-season crops and become more vulnerable to food insecurity. Some 15,000 people are already food insecure at crisis levels (phase 3 of the Cadre harmonisé) in Salamat.

    LAKE CHAD BASIN CRISIS

    MORE ASSISTANCE PLEDGED FOR LCB CRISIS

    Governments, regional organizations and aid groups on 23 September pledged a major increase in life-saving support to the millions of people affected by the crisis across the Lake Chad Basin. At a high-level event held on the margins of the UN General-Assembly, donors including Belgium, Italy, the United Kingdom and the United States pledged over US$163 million in humanitarian support for the Lake Chad Basin where some 9 million people are in need of assistance. As of midSeptember, only $197 million (or 27 per cent) of the $739 million required until the end of 2016 had been received.

    MALI

    RISING NIGER RIVER THREATENS 60,000 PEOPLE

    The National Water Authority on 19 September warned that in the Mopti region the swelling of Niger River will soon reach alert level if the waters continue to rise. More than 60,000 people could be directly affected by flooding. The authorities are activating the flood contingency plan and prepositioning food stocks and other basic relief items such as shelter and water.

    NIGER

    RIFT VALLEY FEVER ERUPTS IN WESTERN REGION

    Fifty-two people have been infected and 21 others died of Rift Valley Fever in Niger’s south-western Tchintabaraden district between 2 August and 17 September. The victims had been in direct contact with infected livestock. Tchintabaraden is home to some 250,000 people and borders Gao region in neighbouring Mali. The Government, in partnership with WHO and other partners, is leading response.


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    Source: Assessment Capacities Project
    Country: South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda

    Crisis overview

    Since mid-July over 15,000 South Sudanese refugees have arrived in the territories of Faradge and Aru in Haut-Uele and Ituri provinces following a resurgence of violence in South Sudan. DRC has been experiencing an influx of refugees into Aru territory in Ituri, close to the border with South Sudan, since October 2015. There is now a total of 27,250 registered South Sudanese refugees in the territories of Faradge and Aru in Haut-Uele and Ituri provinces. The new arrivals have received little humanitarian assistance. Lack of food, shelter, and medicine has been reported in Ituri.

    Key findings

    Anticipated scope and scale
    The security situation in South Sudan is likely to remain volatile over the coming months. Fighting between government and opposition forces will continue across the country, including across parts of Central and Western Equatoria, from where people are likely to continue to flee to neighbouring DRC.

    Priorities for humanitarian intervention
    - Food: The South Sudanese refugees in Ituri lack food, and face severe food insecurity.
    - Health: As more people continue to arrive in Ituri, sites become overcrowded and the risk of disease outbreak is high. Refugees are likely to have travelled long distances and be in need of health assistance.
    - Protection: Refugees are likely to be in need of psychosocial support as grave human rights abuses, including a high incidence of sexual violence, have been reported in South Sudan since conflict escalated in July.

    Humanitarian constraints
    Armed groups have been increasingly active in Mambasa, Ituri, since August, limiting access. Violence has also increased in neighbouring Nord-Kivu, which is likely to further constrain access to Ituri.

    Lack of infrastructure and poor road conditions in the region also impacts the ability of humanitarian actors to deliver aid. The October–June rainy season will further constrain access in the region.


    0 0

    Source: World Food Programme
    Country: Cameroon, Central African Republic, Nigeria

    Highlights

    • Humanitarian needs have significantly increased in Cameroon’s far north region due to Boko Haram’s protracted violence. Funds are still not meeting requirements.

    • WFP urgently requires funding to scale up assistance to newly internally displaced populations and ensure operational continuity up to the end of the year.

    • WFP and UNHCR conducted a Joint Assessment Mission (JAM) in Cameroon’s eastern regions to assess the food security situation and the capacity of C.A.R refugees for self-reliance.

    Operational Updates

    • In July, WFP and partners provided emergency food support to 300,000 people in Cameroon with 4,100 metric tons (mt) of food and USD 600,000 in cash. WFP continues to expand its nutrition preventive programmes across the far north and eastern regions, with the aim of reaching 150,000 young children at risk of malnutrition.

    • Since June 2016, WFP is supporting cross-border delivery of emergency assistance to northeast Nigeria where access is hampered from within the country. Thus far, 250 mt of food has been transported across the border and distributed to IDPs in Banki. However, insecurity and bad road conditions during the rainy season remain critical challenges for the delivery of assistance.

    • Preliminary results of the WFP and UNHCR JAM indicate a trend of improved food security conditions amongst C.A.R refugees following two years of continuous humanitarian response. Refugees in official camp settings appear to be better off in terms of food security than those living in host communities, though the latter group reports better access to land with a few of them practicing agricultural activities. The final mission findings, expected in late September, will guide future programming of food assistance and other forms of support for the refugees.

    • WFP and the Government have completed a strategic review of the food security and nutrition situation in Cameroon to define key humanitarian and development challenges for achieving zero hunger, including gaps in the existing response. The findings and recommendations will be officially presented in early October and will contribute to the Government’s and United Nations’ future planning, defining WFP’s portfolio of assistance in Cameroon for the next five years.


    0 0

    Source: World Food Programme
    Country: Central African Republic, Chad, Sudan

    Highlights

    • In August, WFP Chad welcomed its Regional Director, Mr. Abdou Dieng. His visit was an opportunity to highlight the challenging situation faced by long-term Sudanese refugees in Eastern Chad where levels of funding for humanitarian assistance and reliance are declining.

    • The Government of Japan announced generous support of USD 1.9 million, for food and nutrition assistance programmes to Sudanese refugees. Another USD 7 million is urgently required to ensure a full food basket is provided to the refugees from September to December 2016.

    • WFP continues assistance to over 90,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs) affected by the security crisis in the Lake region. Among these IDPs, 10,000 receive cash-based food assistance.

    • The integrated food and nutritional response for the lean season is ongoing in 8 regions of the Sahel, targeting 410,000 vulnerable Chadians.

    Operational Updates

    PRRO 200713: As of august, WFP continues distributions for the lean season (June-September) in the Sahel as well as targeted preventive supplementary feeding to prevent the deterioration of the nutritional status of children under two, pregnant women and nursing mothers. WFP has prioritized areas with the highest needs targeting 410,000 vulnerable people for food assistance (80% with in-kind and 20% with cash-based assistance) as well as 84,000 children and 34,000 women for nutritional support.

    WFP is currently purchasing 6,000 metric tons from smallholder farmer associations in southern Chad.

    WFP has been forced to suspend its activities in southern Chad in July and August due to funding constraints. Assistance will resume in September with support from Food For Peace (USAID). WFP and UNHCR are preparing the introduction of cash-based transfers to assist CAR refugees.

    EMOP 200777: WFP is providing cash-based food assistance to displaced people in settlement sites around Bol where markets are functioning well. Transfers are combined with nutrition activities. 20,000 internally displaced persons have already been registered in SCOPE, the corporate digital platform for the registration of people assisted. The process is underway in collaboration with IOM for the registration of displaced communities.


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    Source: UN Security Council
    Country: Burkina Faso, Burundi, Central African Republic, Comoros, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda

    I. Introduction

    1. The present report is submitted pursuant to the statement by the President of the Security Council of 16 December 2014 (S/PRST/2014/27), by means of which the Security Council requested me to submit to it an annual report on ways to strengthen the partnership between the United Nations and the African Union on issues of peace and security in Africa, including the work of the United Nations Office to the African Union (UNOAU). Outlined herein are the collaborative efforts of the United Nations and the African Union to address threats to peace and security in Africa, and the key role played by UNOAU, established in 2010, in strengthening relations between the two organizations.

    2. The Security Council, the General Assembly and various organs of the African Union have repeatedly called for stronger strategic engagement between the United Nations, the African Union and the regional economic communities/regional mechanisms for conflict prevention, management and resolution in Africa, in accordance with Chapter VIII of the Charter of the United Nations. In my report entitled “The future of United Nations peace operations: implementation of the recommendations of the High-level Independent Panel on Peace Operations” (A/70/357-S/2015/682), I noted the significant progress made in institutionalizing United Nations cooperation with regional organizations, including the African Union. I also recognized that the peace and security responsibilities shouldered by the African Union and the regional economic communities/regional mechanisms in Africa had increased in recent years. I am committed to strengthening arrangements to facilitate coordinated action and effective delivery by the African Union for our collective benefit.

    II. Challenges to peace and security in Africa

    3. Since 2001, there has been a reduction in protracted intra-State conflicts on the continent. Collaboration between the United Nations, the African Union, the regional economic communities/regional mechanisms and other partners has contributed to efforts to address issues of peace and constitutional order in politically polarized situations, such as in Madagascar and Guinea-Bissau. Countries emerging from crises or violent conflict, such as Côte d’Ivoire and Liberia, are developing more inclusive political institutions. Peacebuilding and reconciliation efforts have yielded results in Sierra Leone, paving the way for progress towards sustainable development. In addition, the African Union has adopted a normative framework on unconstitutional changes of government and has suspended the participation at its meetings of Governments established through military coups.

    4. Nevertheless, numerous challenges to the prevention, management and resolution of conflict in Africa remain. Transnational networks continue to smuggle weapons, people and illicit drugs across the continent and beyond. Addressing the immediate causes of conflict through preventive diplomacy and mediation will not yield sustainable peace in the absence of long-term sustained measures to tackle structural issues, such as weak governance and political, social and economic marginalization and exclusion. In some instances, the existence of borders which are not fully delineated and demarcated can be sources of conflict, especially when such zones are, or simply are thought to be, rich in resources. Moreover, modern conflicts involve a nebulous array of non-State actors, rapid means of communication, ease of access to weapons and finance, and the spread of violent extremism, which together challenge conventional approaches to conflict management.

    5. The spread of violent extremism and terrorism in Africa, and the humanitarian and human rights crises that they provoke, pose a serious threat to the continent. The emergence and spread of such groups as Al-Shabaab in Somalia, Boko Haram in the Lake Chad basin countries, and the Lord’s Resistance Army, first in Uganda and later in South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Central African Republic, present new threats to peace and security in Africa that require timely and decisive responses from the African Union and the wider international community. In 2007, the African Union deployed the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) to restore stability in the country; it also established the Regional Cooperation Initiative for the Elimination of the Lord’s Resistance Army; and more recently, it has supported the Lake Chad Basin Commission in the establishment of a multinational joint task force to combat Boko Haram. UNOAU has played and continues to play an instrumental role in supporting those and other African Union initiatives to address those threats.


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    Source: Assessment Capacities Project
    Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda

    Crisis overview

    Since mid-July over 15,000 South Sudanese refugees have arrived in the territories of Faradge and Aru in Haut-Uele and Ituri provinces following a resurgence of violence in South Sudan. DRC has been experiencing an influx of refugees into Aru territory in Ituri, close to the border with South Sudan, since October 2015. There is now a total of 27,250 registered South Sudanese refugees in the territories of Faradge and Aru in Haut-Uele and Ituri provinces. The new arrivals have received little humanitarian assistance. Lack of food, shelter, and medicine has been reported in Ituri.

    Key findings

    Anticipated scope and scale
    The security situation in South Sudan is likely to remain volatile over the coming months. Fighting between government and opposition forces will continue across the country, including across parts of Central and Western Equatoria, from where people are likely to continue to flee to neighbouring DRC.

    Priorities for humanitarian intervention
    - Food: The South Sudanese refugees in Ituri lack food, and face severe food insecurity.
    - Health: As more people continue to arrive in Ituri, sites become overcrowded and the risk of disease outbreak is high. Refugees are likely to have travelled long distances and be in need of health assistance.
    - Protection: Refugees are likely to be in need of psychosocial support as grave human rights abuses, including a high incidence of sexual violence, have been reported in South Sudan since conflict escalated in July.

    Humanitarian constraints
    Armed groups have been increasingly active in Mambasa, Ituri, since August, limiting access. Violence has also increased in neighbouring Nord-Kivu, which is likely to further constrain access to Ituri.

    Lack of infrastructure and poor road conditions in the region also impacts the ability of humanitarian actors to deliver aid. The October–June rainy season will further constrain access in the region.


    0 0

    Source: UN Security Council
    Country: Burkina Faso, Burundi, Central African Republic, Comoros, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, World

    I. Introduction

    1. The present report is submitted pursuant to the statement by the President of the Security Council of 16 December 2014 (S/PRST/2014/27), by means of which the Security Council requested me to submit to it an annual report on ways to strengthen the partnership between the United Nations and the African Union on issues of peace and security in Africa, including the work of the United Nations Office to the African Union (UNOAU). Outlined herein are the collaborative efforts of the United Nations and the African Union to address threats to peace and security in Africa, and the key role played by UNOAU, established in 2010, in strengthening relations between the two organizations.

    2. The Security Council, the General Assembly and various organs of the African Union have repeatedly called for stronger strategic engagement between the United Nations, the African Union and the regional economic communities/regional mechanisms for conflict prevention, management and resolution in Africa, in accordance with Chapter VIII of the Charter of the United Nations. In my report entitled “The future of United Nations peace operations: implementation of the recommendations of the High-level Independent Panel on Peace Operations” (A/70/357-S/2015/682), I noted the significant progress made in institutionalizing United Nations cooperation with regional organizations, including the African Union. I also recognized that the peace and security responsibilities shouldered by the African Union and the regional economic communities/regional mechanisms in Africa had increased in recent years. I am committed to strengthening arrangements to facilitate coordinated action and effective delivery by the African Union for our collective benefit.

    II. Challenges to peace and security in Africa

    3. Since 2001, there has been a reduction in protracted intra-State conflicts on the continent. Collaboration between the United Nations, the African Union, the regional economic communities/regional mechanisms and other partners has contributed to efforts to address issues of peace and constitutional order in politically polarized situations, such as in Madagascar and Guinea-Bissau. Countries emerging from crises or violent conflict, such as Côte d’Ivoire and Liberia, are developing more inclusive political institutions. Peacebuilding and reconciliation efforts have yielded results in Sierra Leone, paving the way for progress towards sustainable development. In addition, the African Union has adopted a normative framework on unconstitutional changes of government and has suspended the participation at its meetings of Governments established through military coups.

    4. Nevertheless, numerous challenges to the prevention, management and resolution of conflict in Africa remain. Transnational networks continue to smuggle weapons, people and illicit drugs across the continent and beyond. Addressing the immediate causes of conflict through preventive diplomacy and mediation will not yield sustainable peace in the absence of long-term sustained measures to tackle structural issues, such as weak governance and political, social and economic marginalization and exclusion. In some instances, the existence of borders which are not fully delineated and demarcated can be sources of conflict, especially when such zones are, or simply are thought to be, rich in resources. Moreover, modern conflicts involve a nebulous array of non-State actors, rapid means of communication, ease of access to weapons and finance, and the spread of violent extremism, which together challenge conventional approaches to conflict management.

    5. The spread of violent extremism and terrorism in Africa, and the humanitarian and human rights crises that they provoke, pose a serious threat to the continent. The emergence and spread of such groups as Al-Shabaab in Somalia, Boko Haram in the Lake Chad basin countries, and the Lord’s Resistance Army, first in Uganda and later in South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Central African Republic, present new threats to peace and security in Africa that require timely and decisive responses from the African Union and the wider international community. In 2007, the African Union deployed the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) to restore stability in the country; it also established the Regional Cooperation Initiative for the Elimination of the Lord’s Resistance Army; and more recently, it has supported the Lake Chad Basin Commission in the establishment of a multinational joint task force to combat Boko Haram. UNOAU has played and continues to play an instrumental role in supporting those and other African Union initiatives to address those threats.


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    Source: Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development, UN High Commissioner for Refugees, REACH Initiative
    Country: Niger


    0 0

    Source: Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development, UN High Commissioner for Refugees, REACH Initiative
    Country: Niger


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria

    (New York, 23 septembre 2016) Les principaux gouvernements, organisations régionales et agences humanitaires se sont engagés à accroître considérablement l’assistance qu’ils apportent aux millions de personnes affectées par la crise humanitaire dans la région du Bassin du Lac Tchad.

    Répondant à l’appel du Vice-Secrétaire général des Nations Unies, Jan Eliasson, durant une réunion de haut niveau qui s’est tenue en marge de l’Assemblée générale de l’ONU, les principaux bailleurs de fonds, y compris la Belgique, l’Italie, le Royaume-Uni et les Etats-Unis, ont annoncé une intervention totale de 163 millions de dollars pour la région qui s’étend de l’extrême-nord du Cameroun et l’ouest du Tchad au sud-est du Niger et nord-est du Nigeria.

    « Je suis très encouragé par les nouvelles déclarations de soutien qui sont ressorties de la réunion d’aujourd’hui, » a annoncé Stephen O’Brien, le Secrétaire général adjoint aux affaires humanitaires et Coordonnateur des secours d’urgence. « Nous devons maintenant utiliser ces ressources supplémentaires essentielles pour accélérer la réponse humanitaire et faire tout ce qui est en notre pouvoir pour rapidement accroître l’assistance vitale dont des millions de personnes ont besoin. »

    Au-delà du soutien financier, les pays affectés ainsi que les agences et organisations humanitaires ont déclaré renforcer leur collaboration afin de répondre aux besoins immédiats des communautés affectées, fournir une aide au développement sur le long-terme et s’attaquer aux causes profondes de la crise.

    Plus de 9 millions de personnes ont besoin d’aide humanitaire d’urgence dans la région du Bassin du Lac Tchad. Plus de 6 millions de personnes font aujourd’hui face à l’insécurité alimentaire et 2,6 millions de personnes dont 1,5 million d’enfants, ont dû fuir leurs villages. Les violences et l’insécurité ont mis les activités économiques et l’agriculture à l’arrêt au travers de toute cette région qui a maintenant perdu trois saisons de plantation.

    « La crise du Bassin du Lac Tchad fait partie des urgences humanitaires les plus aiguës au monde. La situation de nombreuses communautés affectées s’est détériorée pour atteindre des niveaux plus qu’alarmants. Si nous ne réagissons pas rapidement, et en particulier dans les zones qui n’étaient pas accessibles précédemment, des milliers de personnes risquent de mourir, » a insisté le Sous-Secrétaire général et Coordonnateur Humanitaire Régional pour le Sahel, Toby Lanzer.

    Les agences de l’ONU et les ONG partenaires ont intensifié leurs opérations pour répondre aux besoins des plus de 6 millions de personnes touchées par la crise, dont 800 000 se trouvent dans des zones nouvellement accessibles au nord-est du Nigeria. La réponse reste toutefois sous-financée. Avant la réunion de vendredi, seuls 197 millions (soit 27 pour cent) avaient été reçus sur les 739 millions de dollars prévus afin de pouvoir apporter l’aide humanitaire d’urgence nécessaire jusque fin 2016, ce qui signifiait un manque de 542 millions de dollars.

    Le Fonds central pour les interventions d’urgence (CERF), géré par le Bureau de la coordination des affaires humanitaires de l’ONU (OCHA), a accordé un financement de plus de 90 millions de dollars pour une aide humanitaire d’urgence en 2015-2016 bénéficiant 2,5 millions de personnes affectées par la crise du Bassin du Lac Tchad.

    L’Organisation de la Coopération Islamique (OCI) et l’Union Européenne ont co-organisé la réunion avec OCHA. Le président de la République du Tchad, Idriss Déby, le président de la République du Niger, Mahamadou Issoufou, le président de la République du Nigeria, Muhammadu Buhari, le ministre de l’Administration territoriale et de la Décentralisation du Cameroun, René Emmanuel Sadi, le Commissaire européen chargé de l’aide humanitaire et la gestion des crises, Christos Stylianides et le Secrétaire général de l’OCI, Iyad Ameen Madani, ont figuré parmi les orateurs lors de la réunion de haut niveau.

    Pour plus d’informations, merci de contacter :
    Amanda Pitt, OCHA New York, pitta@un.org, Tel. +1 917 442 1810
    Eve Sabbagh, RHC Sahel, sabbaghe@un.org, Tel. +221 77 569 96 54
    OCHA press releases are available at www.unocha.org or www.reliefweb.int.


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    Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
    Country: Nigeria

    Key messages

    • Almost 4.5 million people face acute food insecurity in northeast Nigeria and require immediate assistance, according to the latest Cadre harmonisé analysis, released on 19 August.

    • FAO is seeking USD 25 million to tackle food insecurity among returnee, IDP and host communities between September 2016 and May 2017. Of this, USD 10 million is needed urgently to support irrigated vegetable production and micro-gardening in the dry season.

    • Preparations must begin soon for the 2017 main rainy season to ensure timely delivery of agricultural inputs.

    • Food security coordination and analysis are critical to inform responsive, timely decision-making and programming.

    • Given the severity of the situation and the windows of opportunity offered by access to newly liberated areas, we must act now to rapidly restore food security and tackle severe hunger and malnutrition.


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    Source: Amnesty International
    Country: Nigeria

    The continuing spate of arrests and detentions of journalists and bloggers amid the security forces’ violent disruption of peaceful protests underscores how the Nigerian government appears determined to crush dissent and suffocate freedom of expression, said Amnesty International today.

    The organization is calling for the authorities to ensure the rights of Nigerians to freedom of peaceful assembly and freedom of expression, as guaranteed by international human rights law and the Nigerian Constitution.

    “The escalation in the intimidation of journalists and bloggers over recent months seems to be little more than a barefaced attempt by the Nigerian government to muzzle dissenting voices in the country,” said Makmid Kamara, Interim Country Director at Amnesty International Nigeria.

    “Alongside the security forces’ violent assault on peaceful protesters, this crackdown constitutes a growing threat to human rights enshrined in international law and the Nigerian constitution.”

    Violent repression of protests

    On 22 September police blocked a peaceful protest by members of the Islamic Movement in Nigeria (IMN) in the capital Abuja. The demonstration called for the release of their leader, Sheikh Ibrahim Al-Zakzaky, who has been in detention without trial since December 2015. Police fired tear gas canisters to disperse the peaceful protest, resulting in some minor injuries.

    About two weeks earlier, on 6 September, police stopped members of the Bring Back Our Girls Movement gathering to march to Aso Rock Presidential Villa to demand that the government do more to secure the release of Chibok schoolgirls abducted by Boko Haram over two years ago. The police had been duly notified of the protest march. Since the abduction of the Chibok girls in April 2014, the movement has been gathering peacefully at Unity Fountain, where recently there has been a continuing police presence apparently aimed at preventing any form of civil assembly.

    Scores of supporters of Biafran independence are in detention – many of them since late January - for attempting to hold or participating in peaceful assemblies. On several occasions security forces have used excessive force against pro-Biafran activists who have attended protest marches across south-eastern Nigeria, or who have attempted to do so. Amnesty International has documented cases of arrest, enforced disappearance, and often killing of supporters and members of various pro-Biafran groups in the region.

    Intimidation and arrests of journalists and bloggers

    There has also been an increase in recent months in arrests of journalists and their subsequent detention without trial.

    In the first week of September the publisher Emenike Iroegbu was arrested in the presence of his family over alleged defamation. In August, Abubakar Usman, a prominent blogger, was dragged from his home by operatives of the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC). The anti-graft agency claimed that he was detained for activities that contravened the Cyber Crimes Act even though EFCC could not point out the provisions of the Act the blogger contravened.

    Across Nigeria people, especially journalists and bloggers, are being arrested merely for expressing critical opinions on both conventional and social media platforms. One recent example is the detention of Jamil Mabai, accused of posting comments on Facebook and Twitter critical of the Katsina state government.

    Also, on 5 September, Ahmed Salkida, a Nigerian journalist based in the United Arab Emirates was declared wanted by the military and later arrested by the state security services on arrival in Nigeria. He was among three people arrested and briefly detained for alleged links to Boko Haram and for facilitating the release of a Boko Haram video on the abducted Chibok girls.

    “Taken together, these are worrying signs of growing violations of the rights of people in Nigeria to peacefully assemble freely and express their views without the fear of being detained or harassed,” said Makmid Kamara.

    “Amnesty International Nigeria is therefore calling on the Nigerian government to comply with its obligations under international human rights law and the fundamental rights provisions in the Nigerian Constitution which guarantee freedom of peaceful assembly and expression. Everyone must be able to express his or her opinion, including through peaceful protest.”

    Amnesty International Nigeria is also calling on the Nigerian government to take urgent steps to bring an end to detention without trial and intimidation and harassment of journalists and bloggers, and the security forces’ excessive use of force to disperse peaceful protests.


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    Source: PAX
    Country: Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda

    A large number of people in the Horn of Africa have grown up in the midst of armed conflict. They are never far from violence and danger. The abundance of weapons in the region and the constant influx of new arms play a large role in these conflicts. In the report 'Armed and insecure', PAX provides a unique overview of the manner in which armed conflict and the arms trade reinforce each other.

    'Armed and insecure' deals with the security situation and the arms trade between 2010 and 2015 in Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan and Uganda.


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: South Sudan

    Background

    Tensions in Yei began in late 2015 with the arrival of new security forces to the area. Tensions were exacerbated between the local community and security forces following the killing of a Catholic nun and medical doctor who was shot by SPLA forces at a checkpoint on 16 May 2016, and later died from her injuries. Following the July fighting in Juba, Yei Town and areas south of Yei in the Lasu Payam and towards the Yei – Kaya road have seen intense fighting and insecurity. Large numbers of civilians have fled across the border to Uganda and Democratic Republic of Congo, while thousands are reported to remain trapped in areas outside of Yei town where clashes are ongoing. Targeting of civilians -including killings, abductions, sexual violence, forced recruitment and mistreatment by armed groups- has been reported. On 6-8 September, an inter-agency rapid needs assessment and response mission travelled to Yei to assess the humanitarian needs.

    Key overview of findings

    Yei Town and surrounding areas are facing a protection crisis.
    Fighting and continued insecurity in Yei has resulted in the displacement of around 60-70 percent of the population.
    The team noticed the emptying of most neighbourhoods, with locked homes visible in all communities. Only those without the resources for transport or other means to leave town remain. In interviews conducted by the team, civilians reported that neighbours had fled and many cited that the isolation felt them fearful. Protection was the most cited need amongst all those interviewed followed by food and medicines.

    Violent attacks - including killings of civilians using machetes (pangas) and guns, abductions, sexual violence, forced recruitment and mistreatment by armed actors - were reported to the assessment team, and civilians expressed fears of ‘retaliation attacks’ when armed groups were attacked outside of town. It was reported in several interviews that individuals feel that they are in the middle of armed groups both inside and outside of town and fear attacks from all groups. They live in constant fear and are unsure of where the threat will come from.

    Access outside of Yei town remains difficult due to the presence of checkpoints and armed actors. Civilians report that villages and crops have been damaged and, in some instances, destroyed. Most people no longer have access to their farms.
    However, some are still undertaking the risky journey to bring subsistence produce to markets and their families.

    The markets in Yei town are functioning, but at a considerably reduced capacity. The price of goods has increased notably due to the combination of supply shortages, depreciation of the South Sudanese Pound, and impact of the economic crisis. Due to highly insecure road routes, trucks have not been travelling on the roads since early July.

    While the food security situation is not currently at crisis levels, it could rapidly deteriorate if the protection crisis, restrictions on movements and insecurity continue, the situation could deteriorate to a humanitarian emergency.


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    Source: World Food Programme
    Country: Mali, Niger

    Highlights

    • The lean season distributions are ongoing in all regions. Assistance has been provided to 250,000 people, including children between 6-59 months and pregnant and nursing women.

    • The launch of the e-voucher system took place in Mangaizé refugee camp using SCOPE database which ensures transparency and quality of data, and facilitates data analysis and distributions.

    Operational Update

    Integrated resilience programme:

    • The national strategy for local purchases (PAA initiative) was validated by the Government of Niger. This a big step for WFP as it provides sustainable market opportunities to smallholder farmers and strengthens South-South cooperation with Brazil.

    • The national SMART nutrition assessment began in late August and is currently ongoing. Additional training for the SMART assessment targeting the displaced populations in Bosso (Diffa commune) was conducted in August. Report should be released by end of September.

    • The second joint WFP/Allianz NGO post distribution monitoring (PDM) assessment began on the 28th of August. The results are expected to be compiled by end of September.

    Humanitarian assistance:

    • WFP continues to assist 58,900 Malian refugees through unconditional assistance (food/voucher) in Tabarebarey, Abala and Mangaize camps and Intikane and Tazalit hosting sites.

    • In August, WFP and UNHCR successfully launched an evoucher distribution in Mangaizé refugee camp. The first phase benefited 9,000 people but the e-voucher project is expected to scale up 66,300 people living in other camps before the end of the year. In 2017, WFP plans to register the different group of people it assists into the SCOPE platform.

    • WFP and partners continue to assist populations in the Diffa region affected by the evolving insecurity in the Lake Chad Basin.

    • Air support: UNHAS continues to provide air transport services to the humanitarian community in all five regions of Niger. In August, UNHAS transported 1,357 passengers, including one medical evacuation, and 3,397 kg of cargo.


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    Source: European Commission Humanitarian Aid Office
    Country: Mali

    Bruxelles, le 29 septembre 2016

    L'Union européenne poursuit son engagement en faveur du développement et de la stabilisation du Mali

    Le Commissaire européen à la coopération et au développement, Neven Mimica, effectue une visite d’un jour au Mali. A cette occasion, il signera le lancement de plusieurs projets de coopération et s’entretiendra avec les plus hautes autorités maliennes.

    Cette visite s’inscrit dans le cadre du suivi de la mise en œuvre de la coopération entre le Mali et l’Union européenne. La visite du Commissaire Mimica doit permettre de confirmer l’appui de l’Union européenne à la mise en œuvre de l’Accord de paix inter-malien et de discuter de la question de la migration irrégulière avec les autorités maliennes, afin de trouver des solutions communes à la tragédie que vivent des milliers de personnes. Le Gouvernement pourra informer le Commissaire de l'état d'avancement du processus de paix.

    Le 15 mai 2013, l’Union européenne (Commission européenne et Etats Membres) avait annoncé la mobilisation de 1,350 milliards d'euros pour soutenir le renouveau du Mali, dont 523,9 millions d'euros étaient apportés par la Commission européenne. Un engagement renouvelé à Paris, le 22 octobre 2015, où la communauté internationale et notamment l’UE s’engageaient de nouveau à hauteur de 3.3 milliards d’euros en faveur de la reconstruction du nord du pays.

    Où en sommes-nous aujourd'hui?

    La Commission européenne a tenu ses promesses. Sur les 523,9 millions d'euros annoncés à Bruxelles en 2013, l’ensemble a été engagé et payé, notamment via un appui direct au budget de l'Etat malien, à la réforme de l'Etat de droit et l'appui à la délivrance des services sociaux de base à la population.

    L'appui de l'UE au Mali se poursuit sur la période 2014-2020 grâce à la mobilisation d'une enveloppe de 615 millions d'euros dans le cadre du Fonds européen de développement en faveur de:

    (i) la réforme de l'Etat (280 millions d'euros)

    (ii) la sécurité alimentaire et le développement rural (100 millions d'euros)

    (iii) l'éducation (100 millions d'euros)

    (iv) la construction de la route reliant Bourem à Kidal (110 millions d'euros)

    De plus, 10 millions sont prévus pour l'appui à la société civile et 15 millions pour le renforcement des capacités de l'administration nationale.

    La Commission européenne veille à ce que les dons alloués au Gouvernement malien soient utilisés pour le bénéfice direct des populations et suit de près les mesures correctives annoncées par le Gouvernement en matière de gestion des finances publiques.

    En complément, l’Union européenne a mobilisé en faveur du Mali le Fonds fiduciaire d'urgence pour l’Afrique, destiné à lutter contre les causes profondes de la migration irrégulière, et sur base duquel déjà 91.5 millions d'euros projets ont été approuvés en faveur du Mali. Ces projets contribueront à améliorer la résilience des populations les plus vulnérables, à renforcer le développement local, l’accès aux services sociaux de base, la gouvernance et la sécurité. Ils complètent encore l’assistance humanitaire, d’environ 40 milions d'euros par an, et l’aide fournie par des missions d’appui dans les domaines de la défense et de la sécurité.

    Contexte

    L'aide européenne au Mali se situe dans un contexte de pays fragile. La crise politique et sécuritaire au Mali a été notamment marquée par un coup d'Etat en mars 2012, l'occupation des régions du nord du pays par des groupes terroristes puis la libération de ces territoires, et une transition politique en vue du plein retour à l'ordre constitutionnel. A la suite de ces évolutions, les interventions de l'UE au Mali ont été révisées et réorientées afin d'adapter la coopération au contexte et aux nouveaux besoins, notamment:

    • la promotion de l'Etat de droit et l'organisation d'un processus électoral conforme aux standards internationaux;

    • le renforcement de l'autorité et de la présence de l'Etat sur l'ensemble du territoire afin d'appuyer le redéploiement des services sociaux de base;

    • le soutien aux efforts des autorités maliennes civiles pour rétablir l'ordre public et assurer la protection des civils;

    • l'aide humanitaire au profit notamment des populations déplacées et des populations des régions affectées par la crise alimentaire;

    • la poursuite des efforts de développement des autorités à moyen et long terme.

    MEMO/16/3211

    Personnes de contact pour la presse:
    Carlos MARTIN RUIZ DE GORDEJUELA (+32 2 296 53 22)
    Christina WUNDER (+32 2 299 22 56)
    Renseignements au public: Europe Direct par téléphone au 00 800 67 89 10 11 ou par courriel


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    Source: World Food Programme
    Country: Nigeria

    Highlights

    • According to the August 2016 Cadre Harmonisé report, there are 4.4 million food insecure people in Borno, Yobe and Adamawa States, of which 1.1 million are severely foodinsecure in Borno and Yobe.

    • WFP continued its cross-border operation from Cameroon to Banki to assist 25,000 Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs).

    Operational Updates

    • In August 2016, WFP was informed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs that it had been granted immunities and privileges to operate in Nigeria.

    • Since June 2016, when more areas became accessible,
      WFP has scaled up from targeting 431,000 to reach 724,000 IDPs up to end December 2016. WFP will continue to provide assistance through CBT, General Food Distributions (GFD) - where there are no fully functioning markets; and BSFP to 150,000 children 6 to 59 months.

    • By the end of August, WFP assisted 86,800 people with cash, 140,600 people with food and 53,400 children aged 6 to 59 months with nutritious food.

    • WFP is conducting a cross-border food delivery operation from Cameroon to Banki due to challenges of accessing Banki from Maiduguri. To date, 1,300 mt have been delivered to 25,000 people in Banki Town.

    • Since UNHAS Nigeria operated its first fixed-wing flight on 17 August 2015, until 31 August 2016, the service has transported 7,850 passengers and 30.1 mt of humanitarian cargo for 55 organizations. Since the introduction of rotary-wing flights on 7 July 2016,
      UNHAS has moved 562 passengers and 4.9 mt of vital light cargo such as medical supplies and vaccines for 19 organizations.


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Cameroon, Niger, Nigeria

    Nigerian Returnees

    UNHCR's intervention to returnees from Cameroon and Niger includes supporting the monitoring of return movement and profiling of returning Nigerians, providing targeted assistance to returning Nigerians, developing the capacity of key stakeholders to the response and advocating for conditions of returns to comply with International legal norms.

    Borno: The Cameroonian government has further identified over 67,000 Nigerians who returned from Northern Cameroon mainly at the Fotokol border to Gamboru Ngala, Borno State from January through April 2016. In response, UNHCR is collaborating with Nigerian Immigration Service (NIS) to register returnees in Gamboru Ngala. As of July 2016, NIS has registered over 40,000 returnees, with registration ongoing.

    Yobe: In view of the increasing movement of Nigerian returnees into Yobe State from Niger, UNHCR partnered with the Nigeria Immigration Service (NIS) Comptroller in Yobe State to initiate registration of returnees in Geidam and Gashua. NIS has thus far registered over 20,000 returnees from Niger.

    Adamawa: UNHCR, in collaboration with Nigeria Immigration Service (NIS) and Nigerian Red Cross Society (NRCS) has registered a total of 22,098 Nigerian returnees from Cameroon to Adamawa State from August 2015 through the first half of 2016.


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    Source: World Food Programme
    Country: Senegal

    Highlights

    • WFP provided the Government and cooperating partners trainings on planning and implementing food security and nutrition interventions within the context of the national response plan.

    Operational Updates

    • Nutrition: 50 staff from Government and NGOs working with the Cellule de Lutte contre la Malnutrition (CLM) in Podor and Linguère departments have been trained in nutrition, cashbased transfers and targeting methods. This kind of trainings help ensure the effectiveness of the national response capacity and the availability of local competencies in food security and nutrition interventions.

    • Under the Government’s response plan, WFP provided targeted food assistance to 19,314 vulnerable people affected by climate shocks and malnutrition using cash-based transfers through vouchers in Matam department.

    • A new Field-Level Agreement has been signed with Africare to integrate a nutrition component with targeted food assistance in Matam department. This will ensure the provision of nutrition supplement to children 6-23 months old and to pregnant and nursing women living in vulnerable households receiving food assistance through cash-based transfers.

    • School meals: A study on the costs of school meals is ongoing to support the Government within the framework of the transition towards an autonomous and sustainable homegrown national school feeding programme.

    • WFP with the financial support of the Center of Excellence Against Hunger in Brazil is providing support to the African Network for School Feeding for the setting up of their website.

    • Resilience and Rural Development: Under the R4 Initiative, works related to the construction of the rainy season assets continued in August in the regions of Kaffrine, Kolda and Tambacounda. Climate information was also provided to participants in the insurance and risk reduction components.

    • A Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) mission was undertaken in Tambacounda, Kolda and Kaffrine to assess the satisfaction of people assisted by the R4 initiative after the first distribution of the lean season.
      Data analysis and reporting is ongoing.

    • Logistics: About 153.35 mt of food were received in Dakar port for the PRRO nutrition activities. A total of 165.236 mt of commodities were delivered in Extended Delivery Points (EDP) of Matam, Ranerou and Podor for blanket feeding activities.


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