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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Burkina Faso, Mali, Mauritania, Niger

    HIGHLIGHTS

    • Security incidents and inter-communal clashes in Mali continue to trigger population displacement in the region, leading to a slight increase in the overall number of Malian refugees and a limited number of refugee returns ;

    • UNHCR and WFP’s ability to distribute food assistance at planned levels is severely constrained by critical funding shortfalls, especially in Burkina Faso and Mauritania;

    • UNHCR and its partners are leveraging their interventions to open windows of opportunity for self-reliance for the most vulnerable people among the displaced population, promoting different forms of innovative and diversified social protection and safety net options;

    • UNHCR continues to heavily invest in mitigating the crisis impact in host and local communities and strengthen peaceful coexistence.

    KEY FIGURES

    144,675 Malian refugees in Burkina Faso, Mauritania, Niger

    5,556 Newly registered Malian refugees in Niger (December – February)

    52,163 IDPs in Mali

    FUNDING

    USD 110.1 million required by UNHCR for the situation in 2016


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    Source: UN Security Council
    Country: Burundi, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Liberia, Mali, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Uganda, World

    SC/12304
    7658th Meeting (AM)
    Security Council | Meetings Coverage

    Their Role Often Lauded, Rarely Visible, Says Gender Entity Chief, as Other Briefers Detail Progress, List Challenges

    Women must be placed at the centre of efforts to prevent or resolve conflict in Africa, speakers said today as the Security Council took up the “women, peace and security agenda”, considering the role of women in creating more peaceful and equitable societies on the continent.

    Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Executive Director of the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and Empowerment of Women (UN-Women), noted that the role of women in preventing conflict was often lauded, but rarely visible. However, Women’s Situation Rooms had been established in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Senegal, Mali, Guinea-Bissau, Uganda and Kenya in the last five years to monitor and prevent election-related violence. In critical electoral periods, the centres trained and deployed female observers and monitors, received and analysed hundreds of complaints, as well as reports of violence or intimidation, and referred violations to the appropriate authorities.

    Citing the 2015 Global Study on Women, Peace and Security, she said countries with lower levels of gender inequality were less likely to resort to force; that women’s security was one of the most reliable indicators of a State’s peacefulness; and that their different spending patterns contributed directly to post-conflict social recovery. Conversely, women were the first to notice attacks on their rights and freedoms, as well as the militarization and radicalization of individuals in their families and communities.

    “Women’s empowerment is our best line of defence against militarism and violent extremism,” she continued. Also, recent research by UN-Women indicated that women and communities had been highly influential in the reintegration of former combatants in Mali. In Kenya, women’s organizations were working to identify and prevent the spread of radicalization in areas where marginalization, poverty and inequality were rampant. In Burundi, hundreds of women mediators were working tirelessly throughout the country to address local conflicts and prevent an escalation of tensions.

    Macharia Kamau (Kenya), Chair of the Peacebuilding Commission, recalled that, in 2013, that body had developed a declaration on women’s economic empowerment for peacebuilding, while the Council had adopted various resolutions on women, peace and security since the late 2000s. Yet, the translation of formal commitments into action on the ground had not been as systematic as had been hoped, and high expectations for transformative change had not been fully realized.

    “Women remain a resource that has not been effectively utilized or enabled to build sustainable peace,” he declared. As such, the Commission had outlined its first gender strategy, which it expected to adopt before July, he said, adding that it set out recommendations on strengthening the integration of gender perspectives in all country-specific and strategic engagements. Going forward, the Commission would use its unique leverage to advocate for technical expertise on gender equality and peacebuilding, as well as funding.

    Tayé-Brook Zerihoun, Assistant-Secretary-General for Political Affairs, said that promoting the effective participation of women in conflict mediation and addressing their specific needs in peacemaking efforts had been a priority of his Department since 2010, when its conflict-prevention work had become increasingly inclusive. Since 2012, all United Nations mediation support teams included women, who made up half the number of participants in the Department’s high-level mediation skills training. Nevertheless, unequal access and opportunities for women’s participation in political decision-making processes persisted worldwide, despite concerted efforts to eliminate discrimination and promote women’s empowerment. “Prioritizing prevention and inclusive political solutions has never been more urgent,” he stressed, adding that the African Union and other partners had made notable efforts to ensure that gender was more systematically integrated into electoral processes.

    Tété António, Permanent Observer of the African Union, said that, by choosing to place women at the forefront of its deliberations, the regional bloc had reiterated the continent’s resolve to address all barriers impeding the emancipation of women and girls, and to strengthen both their agency and rights through education, health, participation in decision-making and economic empowerment. “Africa cannot afford to ignore the role of women if we are to realize the vision of an integrated, prosperous and peaceful continent,” he emphasized. In that regard, the African Union had launched a five-year gender, peace and security programme to foster strategies and mechanisms for women’s participation in peace and security.

    Paleki Ayang of the South Sudan Women’s Empowerment Network said the world, and Africa in particular, must move beyond stereotypical images of women as victims during conflict. They were also fighters, peacebuilders, protectors and community leaders. With limited resources and in spite of threats, they organized peace marches, advocated for enhanced peace and security policies and led reconciliation efforts across conflict lines. Conflict-prevention and conflict-resolution strategies would be ineffective without immediately addressing systematic, deliberate and wide-spread sexual violence in South Sudan and the rest of Africa. Urging the Security Council to insist on accountability for atrocities committed by all warring parties, armed groups, security forces and peacekeepers, she said it should also demand that the Joint Monitoring and Evaluation Commission in South Sudan ensure the representation and participation of women.

    In the ensuing debate, Maria Filomena Delgado, Council President for March and Minister for Family and the Promotion of Women of Angola, said reality made it all the more important to take the views of women and children into account in conflict-prevention forums, in peace negotiations and during post-conflict reconstruction efforts.

    Expressing regret that women remained excluded from many mediation and conflict-resolution initiatives, South Africa’s representative said that, in order for more of them to serve as high-level envoys and mediators, there would have to be a systemic shift. The role of women could no longer be limited to certain areas, such as advising on sexual exploitation and abuse, he emphasized.

    Senegal’s representative underscored the unique security challenges confronting some parts of the continent, and called for greater investment in early warning and national emergency response mechanisms so as to ensure the active participation of women and civil society in peace processes.

    Many speakers lamented the dearth of women in peacekeeping activities, with India’s representative pointing out that women constituted less than 4 per cent of signatories to peace agreements and less than 10 per cent of negotiators at peace tables. It had also provided the first-ever Female Formed Police Unit for deployment in Liberia.

    Brazil’s representative noted that women constituted a mere 4 per cent of the 88,000 troops and police currently deployed in United Nations peace operations in Africa.

    Also speaking today was the Deputy Minister for Foreign Affairs of Kazakhstan, as well as representatives of the United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, China, Ukraine, New Zealand, Malaysia, Venezuela, Japan, France, Russian Federation, Spain, Egypt, Sweden (on behalf of the Nordic countries), Australia, Italy, Ethiopia, Israel, Poland, Canada, Iran (on behalf of the Non-Aligned Movement), Belgium, Morocco, Slovakia, Netherlands, Rwanda, Portugal, Turkey, Algeria, Namibia, Thailand, Bangladesh and Indonesia, as well as the European Union and Holy See.

    The meeting began at 10:10 a.m. and ended at 3:40 p.m.

    Briefings

    PHUMZILE MLAMBO-NGCUKA, Executive Director of the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and Empowerment of Women (UN-Women), noted that the role of women in conflict prevention was often lauded, but rarely visible. In the last five years, however, Women’s Situation Rooms had been established in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Senegal, Mali, Guinea-Bissau, Uganda and Kenya to monitor and prevent election-related violence, she said, adding that their positive contribution to peaceful elections had led to their replication in a growing number of countries across Africa. In critical electoral periods, the centres trained and deployed female observers and monitors, received and analysed hundreds of complaints and reports of violence or intimidation, and referred violations to the appropriate authorities.

    Recent research by UN-Women indicated that women and communities had been highly influential in the reintegration of former combatants in Mali, she continued. In Kenya, women’s organizations were working to identify and prevent the spread of radicalization in areas where marginalization, poverty and inequality were rampant. In Burundi, hundreds of women mediators were working tirelessly throughout the country to address local conflicts and prevent an escalation of tensions. Citing the 2015 global study on women, peace and security, she said countries with lower levels of gender inequality were less likely to resort to the use of force; that women’s security was one of the most reliable indicators of a State’s peacefulness; and that their different spending patterns contributed directly to post-conflict social recovery.

    Conversely, women were the first to notice attacks on their rights and freedoms, and the militarization and radicalization of individuals in their families and communities, she noted. “Women’s empowerment is our best line of defence against militarism and violent extremism.” Initiatives aimed at revamping and strengthening prevention work at the United Nations must include steps to ensure that Security Council deliberations were more frequently informed by the perspective and analysis of women on the ground; regular consultations with the Counter-Terrorism Committee to ensure that efforts to counter violent extremism did not shut down space and funding for civil society actors. Furthermore, such efforts should feature the inclusion of robust gender analysis in reports received by the Security Council, greater political and financial support for the work of women’s organizations, and emphasis on investing in gender equality in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

    TAYÉ-BROOK ZERIHOUN, Assistant-Secretary-General for Political Affairs, said recent research had established that women’s participation in peace talks not only facilitated the conclusion and implementation of agreements, but also the sustainability of peace. Promoting women’s effective participation in conflict mediation and addressing their specific needs in peacemaking efforts had been a priority of the Department of Political Affairs since 2010, when its conflict-prevention work had become increasingly inclusive, he noted. Since 2012, all United Nations mediation support teams had included women, and women made up half of the participants in the Department’s high-level mediation skills training, which focused on enhancing gender parity and the future character and configuration of international peacemaking.

    He said the Department also continued to implement, with UN-Women, its Joint Strategy on Gender and Mediation, which helped to build mediation capacity for envoys and mediation teams by providing gender expertise and training, while UN-Women strengthened the capacity of regional, national and local women leaders and peace coalitions, and supported access opportunities for women in peace negotiations. Nevertheless, despite the concerted efforts of international and regional organizations, as well as national Governments to eliminate discrimination and promote the empowerment of women, unequal access and opportunities for women’s participation in political decision-making processes persisted worldwide. “Prioritizing prevention and inclusive political solutions has never been more urgent,” he emphasized. Peace processes afforded unique opportunities for promoting the effective participation of women, he said.

    The United Nations had sharpened its prevention tools over the last decade, he said. Its regional presences and cooperation with regional organizations had yielded positive results, and today, about 85 per cent of United Nations mediation involved working closely with regional and subregional organizations. The Organization’s work on elections also underscored the centrality of women’s participation in decision-making processes. Notable efforts had been made by the African Union and other partners to ensure that gender was more systematically integrated into electoral processes, including election observation. It was encouraging to note that the current average rate of women members of Parliament in Africa was slightly above the global average. The case for inclusive preventative democracy was compelling, he said, pointing out that, through early diplomatic initiatives, the active engagement of civil society and the provision of necessary funding, the international community was better positioned to prevent and resolve conflicts while creating the conditions for political stability and sustainable peace.

    MACHARIA KAMAU (Kenya), Chair of the Peacebuilding Commission, said women’s participation was crucial to sustainable peacebuilding, stressing that the understanding of their role in such efforts was widely shared. In 2013, the Commission had developed a declaration on women’s economic empowerment for peacebuilding, while the Council had adopted various resolutions on women, peace and security since the late 2000s. Yet, the translation of formal commitments into action on the ground had not been as systematic as would have been hoped, he said, adding that high expectations for transformative change had not been fully delivered.

    “Women remain a resource that has not been effectively utilized or enabled to build sustainable peace,” he said, citing such obstacles as cynical cultural practices that maintained patriarchal attitudes; insufficient political will to implement Security Council resolution 1325 (2000) on women, peace and security; militarized approaches to conflict resolution that crowded out organic initiatives; and the absence of gender-sensitive economic recovery. As such, the Commission had outlined its first gender strategy, which it expected to adopt before July, he said, adding that it set out recommendations on strengthening the integration of gender perspectives in all country-specific and strategic engagements.

    Going forward, the Commission would use its unique leverage to advocate for technical expertise on gender equality and peacebuilding, as well as funding, he continued. The combination of commitment on the part of senior leadership, specialized expertise and dedicated financial resources would make a real difference, as had been seen in Burundi, where UN-Women supported a network of 534 women mediators across all municipalities. Placing a personal emphasis on the gender issue, he said that he had seen the ruin that 100 years of colonial and post-colonial policies had wreaked upon women in Kenyan culture and society. “Women remain firmly at the bottom of the rungs of social progress and empowerment,” he said, underlining that a more inclusive future would require that countries respond forcefully to the condition of women in their midst.

    TÉTÉ ANTÓNIO, Permanent Observer of the African Union, recalled the decisive role played by women in the signing of Liberia’s 2003 Accra Peace Agreement, emphasizing: “Africa cannot afford to ignore the role of women if we are to realize the vision of an integrated, prosperous and peaceful continent.” Indeed, the issue of women, peace and security was a priority for the African Union’s Assembly of Heads of State and Government, as well as its Peace and Security Council, he said, noting that the regional body had dedicated 2015 to “women’s empowerment and development towards Agenda 2063”.

    He went on to state that, by choosing to place women at the centre of its deliberations, the African Union had reiterated the continent’s resolve to address all barriers impeding the emancipation of women and girls, and to strengthen both their agency and rights through education, health, participation in decision-making and economic empowerment. It had been the first continental organization to appoint a special envoy on women, peace and security, and sought to strengthen women’s participation, including through the Panel of the Wise.

    Further, the African Union Commission had achieved parity in its leadership and was moving towards 50-50 workforce parity, he said. It had launched a five-year gender, peace and security programme, running through 2020, to foster strategies and mechanisms for women’s participation in peace and security. Going forward, it would be important to increase the proportion of women in police components of peace operations, ensure that the terms of reference for mediation and peacebuilding processes had a clear women’s-participation component, make “women, peace and security” programmes mandatory and invest more in conflict-prevention initiatives.

    PALEKI AYANG, Executive Director of the South Sudan Women’s Empowerment Network, said that the world, and Africa in particular, must move beyond stereotypical images of women as victims in conflict. They were also fighters, peacebuilders, protectors and community leaders. With limited resources and in spite of threats, they organized peace marches, advocated for enhanced peace and security policies and led reconciliation efforts across conflict lines.

    She went on to describe a protection-of-civilians site in South Sudan where ethnic Dinka and Nuer women met to discuss ways to halt violence, emphasizing: “While the men wanted to fight over their tribal differences, women bridged the divide and reduced the tension within the communities.” She urged the Security Council to invest in programmes aimed at increasing women’s inclusion in conflict prevention and resolution strategies, and to promote their meaningful inclusion in elections, including through quotas for women parliamentarians. The Council should also increase support for recruiting more women in national security forces and police, as well as all United Nations peacekeeping missions, and to require consultations with women-led civil society groups in order to advance gender-specific and community priorities.

    She went on to underline that conflict-prevention and conflict-resolution strategies would be ineffective without immediately addressing systematic, deliberate and wide-spread sexual violence in South Sudan and the rest of Africa. The scale of the violence had destroyed the social fabric of South Sudanese communities and threatened to dismantle an already fragile peace. She urged the Security Council to insist on accountability for atrocities committed by all warring parties, armed groups, security forces and peacekeepers. It should also demand that the Joint Monitoring and Evaluation Commission in South Sudan, and other conflict-monitoring mechanisms in the region, ensure the representation and participation of women.

    Statements

    MARIA FILOMENA DELGADO, Council President for March and Minister for Family and the Promotion of Women of Angola, said women and children were the main victims of armed conflicts, and it was, therefore, crucial that their voices be heard in conflict-prevention forums, peace negotiations and post-conflict reconstruction efforts. Institutional mechanisms in Africa must promote an environment that encouraged the participation of women in peace and security, she added, noting that such instruments as the African Charter on the Rights of Women and the African Union Declaration on Gender Equality reflected a renewed awareness of women’s essential role. They had been directly involved in Angola’s post-conflict peacebuilding and reconstruction efforts and the country was sharing its experiences in the Great Lakes region, she said. With strong political will and commitment, women would make a tangible contribution to building a more just and peaceful world.

    MATTHEW RYCROFT (United Kingdom) said gender inequality was not just a women’s issue, but a peace issue. When women’s voices were heard, the chances for lasting peace increased. The voices of women could be powerful, but only if they were in the room at key moments during peace processes. Breaking down the barriers facing women in peace talks required breaking down barriers facing women across society, including keeping girls in school, improving health care and tackling sexual violence. At its heart, it was about ending discrimination against women. The crisis in Burundi provided a heartening example of how powerful women’s organizations could be in mediation efforts, he said, emphasizing that, as the Security Council called upon African leaders to address gender issues, it should itself heed the same call. What signal was sent when the primary body charged with preserving international peace and security only had one woman among its ranks, he asked. Now was the time to appoint a woman as the next Secretary-General of the United Nations.

    MICHELE SISON (United States) said the debate provided an excellent opportunity to take stock of women, peace and security agenda’s implementation in Africa. It should also help more women gain positions of leadership and seats at the negotiating table when issues of peace and security were decided. While some progress had undeniably been made across Africa since the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000), there was still much work to be done, particularly in three areas: first, more should be done to help women overcome systematic obstacles to political participation; second, the international community must address gender-based violence; and third, there must be concerted efforts for concrete successes. Gender-based violence posed a unique challenge to peacebuilding efforts, she said, stressing that gender equality was a security issue. Pointing out that extremists groups were manipulating gender as a means to their ends, she cited research showing that when women were included in peace processes, as in Burundi, Somali and Kenya, it was mainly due to normative pressures from women’s groups and their supporters. That demonstrated that the Council’s words and resolutions had an impact on the ground.

    LUIS BERMÚDEZ (Uruguay) said the number of women in special political missions was limited, urging their greater participation in peace and reconstruction efforts. African States bore the main responsibility in that regard, with national plans driving greater participation by women at all levels, which, in turn, would improve operational efficiency and resolve conflict. At the United Nations, women should be appointed as special representatives, envoys and mediators. Their contribution to peace talks was essential, as seen in Liberia, he said. It had been shown that increasing the number of women in police contingents of peacekeeping missions reduced the undue use of force.

    LIU JIEYI (China) said peacekeeping missions should increase the number of female staff to foster better communication with women and girls. China also advocated a greater role for women in building a culture of inclusiveness, he said, emphasizing that they should be encouraged to engage in all post-conflict reconstruction, disarmament, demobilization and reconstruction efforts. African women should be provided with better skills training and funding for entrepreneurship. China would launch 100 village agriculture projects, build industrial parks and provide training for technical specialists, which would provide new opportunities for African women.

    VOLODYMYR YELCHENKO (Ukraine), associating himself with the European Union, condemned all acts of sexual violence and abuse against women and children, welcoming the International Criminal Court’s decision in the case of former Vice-President Jean-Pierre Bemba of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. During conflict, women were hardly represented at negotiating tables or in community reconstruction efforts, he said, noting that they constituted less than 10 per cent of peace negotiators globally. Welcoming the fact that several African countries had national action plans in place for implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), he commended both the African Union and the United Nations for increasing the number of female military and police officers in peacekeeping missions. Ukraine called for ensuring women’s participation in devising strategies to prevent and respond to such challenges as terrorism and violent extremism, he added.

    CAROLYN SCHWALGER (New Zealand) pointed out that meaningful participation by women in conflict prevention and resolution remained the exception, not the rule. “Including women works,” she said, emphasizing that outdated attitudes and approaches must be challenged. The deployment of trained female election monitors in Senegal, Kenya, Nigeria and the Central African Republic, as well as the nationwide network of women mediators in Burundi, were examples of how women’s participation had made a difference. New Zealand’s own modest contributions included conflict-prevention training, in Ghana last November, by an all-female team from the defence forces. The presence of female personnel empowered local women, ensuring they were not seen only as victims, but also as actors and providers of safety and security. She urged the Council to incorporate the perspectives of women into its work as a matter of course and to encourage their greater participation in all mediation efforts and conflict-prevention processes.

    RAMLAN BIN IBRAHIM (Malaysia) associated himself with the statement to be delivered on behalf of the Non-Aligned Movement, emphasizing that the important role and potential contribution of women in conflict resolution and prevention could no longer be side-lined or ignored. The situation in Africa provided an opportunity to understand what strategies had worked and which challenges remained to be overcome, in order for women to play a more prominent role in international peace and security. Increasing the meaningful participation of women was crucial to ending current conflicts and preventing future ones. The ability to detect early warning signals and act upon them was critical to conflict-prevention efforts, he said, adding that there was ample evidence that women could provide insights into changing dynamics, particularly at the community and grass-roots levels. Long-term peace and security required placing women at the heart of peacebuilding efforts, including through the establishment of legal frameworks for the protection of their rights.

    FODÉ SECK (Senegal), associating himself with the Non-Aligned Movement, said the maintenance of international peace and security could not be achieved without acknowledging the potential contribution of close to half of the world’s population, particularly since they were the main victims of all types of violence. The African Union’s appointment of the Special Envoy on Women, Peace and Security was a significant step forward in bolstering the role of women in mediation, promoting a culture of peace and establishing early warning systems. Senegal actively recruited women for its armed and security forces, after having been the first African State to achieve absolute parity in all local and national elected positions. However, the security situation in the West Africa subregion highlighted new challenges that must be taken into account. There was a need to invest more in early warning and national emergency response mechanisms so as to ensure the active participation of women and civil society in peace processes. That would be especially important when combating radicalization, violent extremism and terrorism.

    RAFAEL DARÍO RAMÍREZ CARREÑO (Venezuela) emphasized that women, including girls, disproportionately suffered the harmful consequences of war perpetrated by armed groups. All efforts to prevent their exposure in violence would be an investment in the future of humankind. Involving women in peace processes represented a strategic opportunity to create the necessary changes that would lead to peace, social equity and justice, he said. Venezuela condemned the violence unleashed by terrorist groups in the Middle East and Africa, he said, noting that women and children had been the primary victims of that violence. It was important to support the participation of women in local peacebuilding initiatives because that would be an important step in addressing their basic needs and security.

    YOSHIFUMI OKAMURA (Japan) said he had found that the best-implemented projects in Africa were always those proposed by women because they were good managers and they were entrepreneurs. They were also brave, standing up for peace, including on the eve of the 2011 crisis in Côte d’Ivoire, when they had marched into the streets of Abidjan banging pans with kitchen utensils and shouting “no” to violence. “When it comes to the role of women in Africa, it is not merely a matter of empowering or protecting women,” he emphasized. “It is a matter of mobilizing their power.” For its part, Japan had underpinned African efforts to establish national action plans on women, peace and security, and had contributed to the informal expert group on that agenda, he said. It would contribute $14 million to both UN-Women and the Office of the Special Representative for Sexual Violence in Conflict in seeking to mobilize the power of African women.

    FRANÇOIS DELATTRE (France) called for a focus on the tools for guaranteeing women’s participation in conflict settlement, noting that their decision-making power must be bolstered by facilitating the participation of civil society. Governments must open the doors to women’s organizations in order to forge sustainable development, he said, urging that the dynamic voice of civil society in Mali be heeded. The African Union should give women greater prominence in its gender, peace and security programme, he said, adding that their role in settling conflicts must be enhanced in the fight against terrorism and violent extremism. Recalling recent events in Mali, Côte d’Ivoire and Burkina Faso, he stressed the need to incorporate the women, peace and security agenda into counter-terrorism strategies. In addition, greater efforts must be made to reintegrate women associated with armed groups into society in order to ensure that they were able to return to their societies and communities.

    EVGENY T. ZAGAYNOV (Russian Federation) said attempts to dictate “settlement recipes” without the consent or request of States were unacceptable. Women had a positive role to play in peace and security matters, he said, emphasizing the importance of the African Union’s five-year peace and security programme in that regard. A balanced approach should be taken to women’s participation in reconstruction. Noting that national action plans in implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) could not be used to assess State gender-promotion policies, he stressed that it was the primary responsibility of States involved in conflict to protect women and afford them equal participation opportunities. Effectiveness in the Council’s work was not always achieved by creating new structures, he said, adding that he was sceptical about creating an informal working group on women, peace and security. The Russian Federation was ready to elaborate effective and tried efforts, and urged the creation of optimum conditions for African women to help resolve conflict.

    ROMÁN OYARZUN MARCHESI (Spain) said that, when women did not participate enough in efforts to resolve conflict, there was an imperfect and unfair peace because part of the population imposed its view on other parts of society. While there had not been a “change in the story” at the United Nations with regard to resolution 1325 (2000), awareness had been raised, notably through resolution 2242 (2015). Most relevant would be the creation of a group of experts on women, peace and security, which would ensure that the Council implemented all relevant resolutions, he said.

    OSAMA ABDELKHALEK MAHMOUD (Egypt) said the significant political momentum created in the Council had bolstered women’s contributions to legal frameworks in Africa, including the Solemn Declaration on Gender Equality in Africa, although such measures had not been fully exploited nor enjoyed the required level of participation. Egypt supported the Secretary-General’s call to increase women’s participation in peacekeeping, mediation and conflict-prevention missions, because evidence in Liberia, Malawi and the Central African Republic had shown that women ruled effectively. Urging the bridging of gaps between adoption and implementation, he said the role of informal expert groups must be stepped up, since their creation was outlined in resolution 2242 (2015). Noting the persisting weakness in the appointment of women to senior posts within special political missions, he said the related action plans overlooked cultural specificities, which were detrimental to women in conflict prevention and resolution. Egypt would adopt a gender-equality strategy, and the national council responsible for women’s status had fine-tuned an action plan based on resolution 1325 (2000), he said.

    YERZHAN ASHYKBAYEV, Deputy Minister for Foreign Affairs of Kazakhstan, noting that conflict in Africa had engulfed neighbouring countries, urged closer collaboration among the United Nations, European Union and the African Union, as well as with African subregional organizations and the Secretary-General’s special representatives that address conflict-related violence against women and children. “Hybrid” peacekeeping missions must have clear mandates for civilian protection, especially for women and girls, while gender specialists and gender teams should be integrated into their military and civilian components. Troop- and police-contributing countries should have gender training and deploy more women. More broadly, the international community should offer greater support to African countries to involve women in grass-roots organizations working for a culture of peace. Women also had a critical contribution to make in managing camps for refugees and internally displaced persons.

    ANTONIO DE AGUIAR PATRIOTA (Brazil), listing a number of recent successes by African women, said that such positive trends could not offset the fact that women constituted a mere 4 per cent of the 88,000 troops and police currently deployed in United Nations peacekeeping operations on the continent. Sexual violence in conflict remained a serious concern for vulnerable populations, and despite the strong African commitment to fight sexual and gender-based violence, some of the most despicable crimes against humanity, including rape and sexual slavery, continued to occur in some regions of Africa. Strongly condemning those abhorrent violations, he said that, as the current Chair of the Commission on the Status of Women, he was deeply committed to gender equality in all political and security processes. Brazil’s South-South cooperation with Africa was closely aligned with the women, peace and security agenda, he said, describing several areas of cooperation. In addition, Brazil served as Chair of the Guinea-Bissau Configuration of the Peacebuilding Commission, which valued the role played by women as responsible stakeholders in a sustainable peace for that country.

    SYED AKBARUDDIN (India) pointed out that women constituted less than 4 per cent of signatories to peace agreements and less than 10 per cent of negotiators at peace tables. They made up only 3 per cent of military forces and 10 per cent of police personnel deployed by United Nations peace missions. Emphasizing the need to increase the involvement of women in conflict prevention and resolution, he said that would require, not only normative advice, but also the building of capacity and institutions at the ground level. Therefore, the issue of women, peace and security could not be seen in isolation from the wider societal context involving gender and development issues. India was the leading contributor of troops to United Nations peacekeeping, participating in 48 of its 69 peacekeeping missions, 22 of which were in Africa, he noted, also pointing out that his country had provided the first-ever Female Formed Police Unit for deployment in Liberia. India had also contributed female soldiers as military observers and staff officers, in addition to deploying them with medical units.

    PER THÖRESSON (Sweden), speaking also on behalf of the other Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland and Norway), said the recommendations of the Global Study and Security Council resolution 2242 (2015) provided the momentum to move away from ad hoc approaches and include women in all stages of conflict prevention, conflict resolution and peace building. “Any international actor working for peace and security that wants to be relevant in the twenty-first century has to integrate the women, peace and security agenda in a coherent and effective manner,” he emphasized. On the inclusive representation of women in peace processes, he said that would ensure that the needs and interests of society were truly addressed and reflected. As highlighted by the Global Study, indisputable evidence established positive links between women’s participation and the likelihood of peace agreements being signed, he said, stressing that increasing the number and percentage of women mediators was a Nordic priority.

    IOANNIS VRAILAS, Deputy Head of the European Union Delegation, said that, in the period between 1992 and 2011, women had made up less than 4 per cent of signatories to peace agreements and less than 10 per cent of peace negotiators. Yet, the Global Study on the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) had shown that, when women were included in peace processes, the probability of lasting peace grew significantly. The international community must devote more resources towards implementing the women, peace and security agenda, he said, welcoming efforts in Africa to galvanize the role of women in conflict prevention and commending the African Union’s zero-tolerance position on sexual exploitation and abuse in conflict situations, including by forces deployed to protect populations.

    Countering violent extremism, he went on to say, was an integral part of conflict prevention and solution strategies. Women and girls could be part of the problem, serving as foreign fighters or recruiters, but they could also be part of the solution. The need to ensure their participation and leadership in countering terrorism and violent extremism was underscored in resolution 2242 (2015) and the Secretary-General’s subsequent Plan of Action to Prevent Violent Extremism. States, regional and international organizations and the United Nations system must work towards that shared goal, he said, adding that the European Union would allocate more than €100 million by 2020 to gender equality and women’s empowerment, including in Africa.

    GILLIAN BIRD (Australia) commended the ongoing efforts of the United Nations and the African Union to secure women’s full and effective participation in all stages of the prevention, resolution and management of conflicts, and post-conflict reconstruction in Africa. Also commending the United Nations Office for West Africa’s (UNOWA) work on advancing gender equality, he welcomed its commitment to adopt a new regional action plan to implement Council resolution 1325 (2000) and to establish an annual dialogue with leaders in the region. Drawing attention to the High-Level Review on Women, Peace and Security, he underlined that women’s meaningful participation was vital to enhance conflict prevention and conflict resolution. The participation of women required a significant cultural change to ensure that human rights and the protection of civilians were considered to be a system-wide responsibility. As the first and largest donor to UN-Women’s Global Acceleration Instrument on Women, Peace and Security and Humanitarian Action, Australia was pleased that it had already been implemented in Burundi.

    SEBASTIANO CARDI (Italy) said sustainable and lasting peace depended on women’s active involvement in related processes. In Africa, more than elsewhere, there was a strong need, not only for peacekeeping, but for positive engagement in mediation and peacebuilding. To support national reconciliation and post-conflict reconstruction and to combat the rise of violent extremism, he said, women could and must help with such processes. Turning to the inclusion and mainstreaming of gender-based issues, he noted that they should be included in all negotiations. Further, he noted, economically empowered women could contribute more effectively to sustainable development, peace and security. In that regard, their access to quality education and health must be bolstered, and all forms of gender-based violence and discrimination must end, he said, describing the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals as the most precious tools for action for a better future.

    MAHLATSE MMINELE (South Africa) expressed regret that women remained excluded from mediation and conflict-resolution initiatives at the highest levels, noting that systematic cultural exclusion obstructed their full participation. In order for more women to serve as high-level envoys and mediators, a systemic shift was needed. The role of women could no longer be limited to certain areas, such as advising on sexual exploitation and abuse. He emphasized the need to ensure that women had unfettered access to justice, and to that discrimination against them in such areas as land ownership, access to economic opportunity and employment, education and health care was addressed. While Member States had the primary responsibility to end impunity and prosecute perpetrators of sexual violence, he said, the Peacebuilding Commission and Peacebuilding Fund could play an important part in supporting the participation of African women in peace processes.

    BERNARDITO AUZA, Permanent Observer of the Holy See, called attention to Sustainable Development Goal 16, noting that in many countries in Africa, peaceful and inclusive societies remained a distant dream. Women could contribute greatly to realizing it. Expressing appreciation for initiatives promoted by the Security Council and Member States in order to raise awareness of the vital role of women, he stressed the need to translate recognition into action. The Holy See had always been very attentive to the inspiring work of African women in defending the voiceless, preventing the outbreak of communal violence, reinforcing fragile peace and fostering human dignity. Through various initiatives, it aimed to consolidate their contributions in order to build peaceful and inclusive societies. On education, he noted that the Catholic Church was the leading provider of quality education for all in Africa.

    TEKEDA ALEMU (Ethiopia) said there was no doubt that women were uniquely positioned to nurture a culture of peace, and enhancing their effective participation would have a meaningful impact on preventing and resolving conflict. While the adoption of resolution 1325 (2000) had been significant, the main issue was the progress made towards its implementation, he said, adding that the African Union’s Gender, Peace and Security Programme to increase women’s participation in the promotion of peace and security was a step in the right direction. The adoption of regional action plans to implement relevant United Nations resolutions was also a positive development. With the largest number of female peacekeepers, Ethiopia was working tirelessly to further enhance its contribution in terms of military and police personnel in the coming years.

    DAVID ROET (Israel) noted that violent extremists group such as Al-Shabaab and Boko Haram were destabilizing States across Africa through vicious campaigns of terror that included the abduction of women and children, many of whom were later sold as sex slaves. However, women were also taking their fate into their own hands, he said, adding that across Africa, they were developing innovative platforms for peaceful elections and establishing strong networks of civil society groups. Nevertheless, the number of women involved in peace talks and field-based political missions remained limited. All gender-based barriers must be removed, he emphasized, adding that Israel stood ready to assist African women through programmes run by its Agency for International Development Cooperation, which encouraged and helped women acquire the skills and knowledge they needed to become political leaders.

    ADAM KRZYWOSADZKI (Poland), associating himself with the European Union, said the rising number of women’s associations should be considered an important sign of the rising position of African women. However, more women were needed in United Nations-led activities, especially peacekeeping and peacebuilding operations. For that reason, Poland had decided to earmark at least 15 per cent of its future funding of the United Nations Peacebuilding Fund for women’s specific needs, in particular advancing gender equality in post-conflict situations. Noting that his country planned to sign the Kigali Principles on the Protection of Civilians, he called the strict implementation of a zero-tolerance policy on acts of sexual exploitation and abuse by United Nations peacekeeping personnel.

    MICHAEL GRANT (Canada) said gender equality, empowerment of women and girls as agents of peace and development, full respect for their human rights and protection from sexual violence were prerequisites for sustainable peace and prosperity. He then commended the African Union’s work in advancing the Women, Peace and Security agenda through the creation of policies and mechanisms. Further, he expressed support to the Union’s appointment of a special envoy on the issue with a view to ensure increased and equal participation of women in peace operations. While it was important to include women in high-level processes to prevent and resolve conflicts, it was equally important to empower women at the local level. For its part, Canada supported projects in Africa to address the specific needs of women and girls in conflict and emergencies. The programming included providing access to justice for survivors and holding perpetrators to account.

    GHOLAMALI KHOSHROO (Iran), speaking on behalf of the Non-Aligned Movement, said that women’s calls for peace had been unfailing and widespread. They played an important role in conflict prevention and resolution, and their participation was crucial to the effectiveness of all peace and security efforts. In Africa, women’s participation in conflict prevention had facilitated a more inclusive appreciation of the causes of conflict, as well as alternative solutions.

    Several key mechanisms had created an enabling environment for women to play a key role in peace and security on the continent, he continued, noting in particular the 2003 Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa, and the 2004 Solemn Declaration on Gender Equality in Africa. Women across the continent were also playing an unparalleled role in early warning and the prevention of violence, including election-related violence, and they had developed innovative platforms for peaceful elections in several countries.

    BÉNÉDICTE FRANKINET (Belgium), associating herself with the European Union, said women must be able to decide their own future. She welcomed initiatives in Africa to increase the role of women, but expressed disappointment that their participation in conflict prevention, peace processes and post-conflict political transitions was still a major challenge. Gender-mixed representation would guarantee a balanced decision-making process that took the entire population into account. She said her country was providing €2 million for a UN-Women programme in the Democratic Republic of the Congo to support economic empowerment and leadership training for women. In Mali, Belgium co-chaired a group of donors on the gender issue, but regretted the under-representation of women in decision-making since the start of the mediation process. Hopefully, the country’s national women, peace and security action plan for 2015-2017 would address that gap.

    ABDERRAZZAK LAASSEL (Morocco) said the international community was in unanimous agreement on women’s contribution to peacekeeping, mediation and peacebuilding activities. As key members of society, their involvement in such processes truly reflected and addressed the needs and concerns of those in need. Calling attention to the relevant Security Council resolutions, he said they recognized the vital role played by women in maintaining peace and security. Despite that recognition, however, women in Africa continued to face numerous challenges while continuing to take non-confrontational approaches in order to ensure the well-being of all, he said.

    FRANTIŠEK RUŽIČKA (Slovakia) said that, over the last few decades, gender equality and women’s empowerment had become a positive and forward-looking vision of Africa’s development. At the continental level, African leaders had adopted strong instruments, including the Maputo Protocol, Solemn Declaration on Gender Equality in Africa and the African Women Decade. Despite the efforts undertaken, however, numerous challenges remained to be addressed, he said. As women continued to suffer disproportionally from conflict, sexual and gender-based violence, as well as violent extremism, it was crucial that Governments accelerate implementation of their commitments. Institutions must be representatives of and responsive to the needs of both men and women, he said, emphasizing that the United Nations approach must be gender-sensitive throughout the planning, design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation phases.

    PAUL MENKVELD (Netherlands) said that enhancing the role of women in conflict prevention and resolution could help counter the rise in violent extremism and the use of sexual violence as a tactic of terror. It was time to put words into action, he said, setting out three pathways to change: an exchange of knowledge and good practices on conflict prevention and women’s participation; support for civil society; and greater protection of women from sexual violence. The hopes and dreams of women in conflict environments had been shared during the October 2015 open debate on women, peace and security, he recalled. It was time to move beyond rhetoric and translate those hopes into practical change, he emphasized.

    EMMANUEL NIBISHAKA (Rwanda) recalled how, in the aftermath of the 1994 genocide, women had immediately involved themselves in rebuilding the country, assuming non-traditional roles in their households and communities. The Government had undertaken a concerted effort, alongside women’s groups, to address the needs of Rwandan women and engage them in national reconstruction and reconciliation. Initiatives to address gender-based violence included one-stop centres offering free services to victims, he said, pointing out that Rwanda now contributed more female police and corrections officers to United Nations peacekeeping missions than any other African country. Despite improvements in the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000), however, challenges remained on several levels, and the international community and Member States would need to do more to sustain past gains, he stressed.

    CRISTINA PUCARINHO (Portugal), noting that women in Africa accounted for more than 50 per cent of the population and workforce, said it was, therefore, unthinkable that peace could ever be achieved and sustained without their involvement and consistent engagement. Women — whether as care providers in families and communities, as community leaders, as religious and traditional leaders, and as political representatives and citizens — could perform critical roles in conflict prevention and as agents of development. The Community of Portuguese Speaking Countries — to which six African countries belonged — had adopted a strategic plan to promote gender equality and empowerment. Its planned activities included preparing national plans for implementation of relevant Security Council resolutions; training and capacity-building in relation to resolution 1325 (2000) focal points; and technical and military cooperation among Member States to implement relevant resolutions.

    LEVENT ELER (Turkey) said the world was facing the largest humanitarian crisis since the Second World War, with an increasing influx of displaced populations and rising challenges for vulnerable populations such as women and girls. Moreover, the horrific acts perpetrated against women and girls by such terrorist organizations as Boko Haram and Da’esh demonstrated the need for a comprehensive strategy to counter violent extremism and terrorism in all their forms and manifestations. In times of conflict and insecurity, African women suffered most as victims of wide-spread sexual and gender-based violence, he noted. Yet, during those very times, they also played a primary role in building and supporting peace. Overall stabilization and development efforts could not succeed in Africa if women lacked security as well as political, economic, social and judicial empowerment, he stressed.

    SABRI BOUKADOUM (Algeria) said that resolution 1325 (2000) reaffirmed the important role of women in conflict prevention and resolution, peace negotiations, peacebuilding, peacekeeping, humanitarian response and post-conflict reconstruction. Preventing violent conflict required cooperation between Governments and local communities and women to resolve disputes through inclusive participation and dialogue. Turning to regional efforts, he noted that the Maputo Protocol and the Solemn Declaration on Gender Equality in Africa had created a suitable environment for women to play a crucial role in peace and security. Emphasizing the importance of improving synergies between regional, continental and international early warning structures, he noted that the African Union was currently operationalizing the Continental Early Warning System, which could be improved through contributions by women. Furthermore, the African Centre for the Constructive Resolution of Disputes had provided training for the SADC Regional Peacekeeping Training Centre on understanding gender issues in peace operations.

    WILFRIED I. EMVULA (Namibia) said that, through the adoption of Council resolution 1325 (2000), the conventional impression of women as helpless victims of wars was replaced by the important role of women in fostering peace and security. Namibia had been the first country in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) to ratify the region’s protocol on gender and development, doing so in 2009. The country was also one of the largest nations to contribute female troops to the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID). At the global level, it was high time to establish and implement an ambitious but achievable agenda for action on women in armed conflict and to allow an increased role for women in the peace process. Provisions of resolution 1325 (2000) must be framed in State obligations to address structural and systemic gender inequality and discrimination. Protecting women from conflicts and violence would remain a priority for the international community, he said, adding that the emphasis on the role of women as leaders in the peacebuilding process would be equally important.

    VIRACHAI PLASAI (Thailand) said women’s empowerment promoted the type of inclusive development and growth that were key to preventing conflicts and sustaining peace. National efforts, therefore, should focus on ensuring their equal access to education, employment, financing, social security, health care and justice. In times of conflict, strong national institutions must be in place to ensure respect for the rule of law and effective monitoring with a view to minimizing the suffering of women and girls. For its part, his delegation had commissioned the International Peace Institute to conduct evidence-based research on the valuable role played by women in peace and security, with research confirming that processes involving them had a higher percentage of success and sustainability. On the recent initiatives that had taken place in Africa, he welcomed the African Union Commission’s gender, peace and security programme, launched in 2014. Having participated in the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID), Thailand recognized that female peacekeepers could effectively engage with local population with a high degree of cultural and gender sensitivity, he said.

    MASUD BIN MOMEN (Bangladesh) stated that, while the protection needs of women remained a foremost concern, it was important to empower and enable them to become instrumental and effective buffers against conflict. It was no surprise that violent extremists and terrorists made it a point to halt women’s empowerment, he said, emphasizing that women’s groups must protest loudly against such trends and engage with other women who, whether forcibly or willingly, were complicit in the misguided agendas of the extremists. As a major troop-contributing country, Bangladesh knew the difference that women peacekeepers could make on the ground, and it was working with the United Nations and others to enhance its participation. Bangladesh was also establishing a peacebuilding centre that would carry out specialized research and training on the role of women in peacebuilding, among other issues.

    MUHAMMAD ANSHOR (Indonesia), calling attention to the 2015 Global Study, said it emphasized that meaningful participation of women was crucial to the effectiveness of all peace and security interventions. Enhancing women’s involvement in conflict prevention and conflict resolution, as well as post-conflict peacebuilding in Africa was an imperative that the United Nations must continue to support, he said. That could be done by enhancing and promoting women’s leadership in peace, security and sustainable development, creating a platform for women across all levels of African societies to exchange, share and harmonize strategies and while building coalitions. In the context of peacekeeping operations, he said women peacekeepers were far better equipped to protect women and girls before, during and after conflict and war. To that end, Indonesia stood committed to increasing the number of its women peacekeepers under United Nations mandates.


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    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Mali

    United Nations, United States | AFP | Monday 3/28/2016 - 21:48 GMT

    Insecurity is spreading in Mali, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has warned, expressing alarm at the myriad challenges facing the UN peacekeeping force in large parts of the African country.

    "The northern and central parts of Mali remain under the threat of criminal, violent extremist and terrorist groups, which take advantage of the limited presence of Malian law enforcement institutions," Ban said in his latest report on the country.

    "The spread of insecurity in Mali and the security threat posed by actors outside of the peace process remain alarming," he added in the confidential report sent to the Security Council, which was seen Monday by AFP.

    Ban in particular raised fears about "persistent operational difficulties" faced by the MINUSMA force, the UN mission in Mali, and called for the government to step up security in the north of the country with more forces.

    Mali's vast, desolate north continues to be beset by violence, having fallen under the control of Tuareg-led rebels and jihadist groups linked to Al-Qaeda in 2012.

    A landmark peace agreement was reached last year between the Mali government and the rebels, but jihadist violence remains a threat and the Malian government has been unable to maintain security with domestic forces alone.

    "I remain concerned that actual progress in the implementation of the peace agreement remains limited," he added, also calling for contributing countries to better equip the peacekeepers.

    "I urge all Malian parties to accelerate the implementation of the agreement in full, especially the political and security provisions."

    avz-pst/sst

    © 1994-2016 Agence France-Presse


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    Source: African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States
    Country: Burkina Faso, Chad, Comoros, Mali

    Brussels, 22 March 2016/ IFADEM/ ACP: Eight thousand teachers are set to benefit from a partnership between the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Group of States, the European Union (EU), the Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie (OIF) and the Agence Universitaire de la Francophonie (AUF).

    The programme aims to train 8000 teachers in rural areas of four ACP countries (Burkina Faso, Comoros , Mali, Chad ) between now and 2018, strengthening their skills for teaching French and as well as teaching in French, under the Francophone Initiative for Distance Training for Teachers (IFADEM - L’Initiative francophone pour la formation à distance des maitres).

    ACP Secretary General Dr. Patrick I. Gomes, the European Commission’s Head of Unit for Education, Health, Research and Culture at DG DEVCO, Ms. Aida Liha Matějíček, OIF Administrator Mr Adama Ouane, and AUF Rector Mr. Jean- Paul Gaudemar marked the launch of the programme with a special ceremony on 17 March.

    All the partners emphasized the relevance of IFADEM actions in improving the quality of education, which is a priority of Agenda 2030. They reiterated the need for joint action to address the challenges faced by many countries, and welcomed the excellent cooperation that exists between the teams.

    IFADEM is a programme contributes to international efforts to improve the quality of basic education for all. Through IFADEM, two international francophone organisations—Organisation internationale de la Francophonie and Agence Universitaire de la Francophonie—aim to improve teachers’ competence and teaching skills, both in language and non-language fields.

    Financing for the initiative comes through the European Development Fund, which is co-managed by the European Commission and the ACP Secretariat, for programmes benefiting the African, Caribbean and Pacific countries signatory to the ACP-EU Partnership Agreement.


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    Source: UN Children's Fund
    Country: Central African Republic, Chad

    Highlights

    • Although the security situation remains volatile in the Lake region, there were no major displacements of people during the reporting period.

    • Three Health Districts are currently experiencing measles outbreaks in the country. UNICEF staff are providing technical and logistical support to the Government and partners in the response to the epidemic.

    • As of the end of January, 10,221 children across Chad have been admitted for treatment of severe acute malnutrition (SAM), among which 269 were cases with medical complications.

    • 15,000 displaced persons, among an estimated 56,639 displaced persons in 22 new sites in Daboua and Liwa areas, have access to safe drinking water in the Lake Region.

    • Financial constraints have led national and international NGOs working in sites for returnees from neighboring CAR to either reduce or end their humanitarian assistance.

    SITUATION IN NUMBERS

    29 February 2016

    2,200,000 Children affected (UNICEF HAC 2016)

    176,900 Children under 5 with Severe Acute Malnutrition in 2016 (Nutrition Cluster 2016)

    90,000 Returnees from Central African Republic (DTM, November 2015)

    60,131 Displaced persons registered in the Lake Region (IOM, Feb 2016)

    UNICEF Humanitarian funding needs in 2016 US$ 62.4 million

    Situation Overview & Humanitarian Needs

    Impact of violence in the Lake Chad region

    The security situation remains volatile in the Lake Region. In February, two Farmers were killed by supposed Boko Haram elements in Mairo village (Tchoukoutalia area). However, there were no major population displacements this month in the Lake Region. Registration of internally displaced persons (IDPs) is ongoing in new sites in the subprefectures of Liwa and Daboua; 1,050 displaced persons (337 households) were registered in Bourora site and 3,425 displaced persons (1,067 households) were registered in Magui site. The inter-agency multisector rapid assessment mission carried out from 14 to 18 January in the Lake Region estimated the number of IDPs and host population to be 9,000 people in Bourora and 8,982 people Magui sites (IOM). In line with recommendations made by the inter-agency assessment mission, humanitarian assistance was directed towards priority sites in Liwa and Daboua sub prefectures.

    Measles outbreak

    From epidemiological week 1 through week 8 in 2016, 238 suspected measles cases have been reported and investigated in the country with 2 cases of deaths registered. These suspected measles cases were reported in 33 Health Districts in 15 administrative Regions. Haraze Mangueigne and Mongo Health Districts notified 121 cases. Three Health Districts are currently experiencing measles outbreaks in the country. These 3 Health Districts are: Haraze Mangueigne in Salamat Region Mongo in Guera region and Bédjondo in Mandoul Region. Samples were collected and 24 of them were tested positive in laboratory. Of the 24 laboratory-confirmed cases, 21 patients out of 24 confirmed cases are under 15 years aged (87%) and only 13% of them were vaccinated.

    Refugees, returnees from CAR and stateless persons in the South

    Financial constraints have led national and international NGOs working in CAR returnees’ sites to reduce or stop their humanitarian assistance in these sites. The impact of the suspension activities are obvious: the latrines gradually fill without renewal, lack of access to primary health care after IRC stopped activities in Djako, and Kobiteye Maingama sites is noticeable. WASH structures built in these sites are not well managed as community workers lack motivation pushing them both to the abandonment of activities after the departure of NGOs. About 90,000 returnees fleeing violence in Central African Republic live in sites, camps and host communities in Southern Chad.


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    Source: Human Rights Watch
    Country: Nigeria

    Government Response to Damasak Attacks Woefully Inadequate

    (Abuja, March 29, 2016) – The Nigerian government should take urgent steps to secure the release of about 400 women and children, including at least 300 elementary school students, abducted by Boko Haram from the town of Damasak in Borno State a year ago, Human Rights Watch said today. It is unclear whether the Nigerian government has made any serious effort to secure their release.

    Damasak is the largest documented school abduction by Boko Haram militants. Yet it has drawn far less public attention than the group’s widely condemned abduction of 276 school girls from a government secondary school in Chibok in April 2014. While 57 of those girls managed to escape, 219 remain captive almost two years later.

    “Three hundred children have been missing for a year, and yet there has been not a word from the Nigerian government,” said Mausi Segun, Nigeria researcher at Human Rights Watch. “The authorities need to wake up and find out where the Damasak children and other captives are and take urgent steps to free them.”

    On November 24, 2014, Boko Haram attacked Damasak, a trading town about 200 kilometers northwest of Maiduguri, near the border with Niger, blocking all four roads leading into the town and trapping residents and traders. The insurgents quickly occupied Zanna Mobarti Primary School, shutting the gates and locking more than 300 students, ages 7 to 17, inside, according to a teacher at the school and other witnesses Human Rights Watch interviewed. The Boko Haram militants then used the school as a military base, bringing scores of other women and children abducted across the town there as captives.

    In February 2016, a woman who was at home in Damasak that morning told Human Rights Watch what happened:

    It was early morning when I heard gunshots and chaos. My husband had already left home for the market so I grabbed my two children, a boy age four years and a girl age two years, and ran. But we ran into Boko Haram and they detained us in the middle of the town. They brought more and more women and children to where we were kept. Then they took all of us to Zanna Mobarti Primary School…I have not seen my children since then.

    The insurgents separated the women from the children and the boys from the girls. Some of the women held captive later told Human Rights Watch they could hear the screams and cries of the children, but they were not permitted to go to them. Over the following weeks and months, the militants forced their captives to learn the Quran. A number of women and children died in captivity after they were fed putrid food, which caused severe vomiting and diarrhea.

    The men who were captured by Boko Haram were kept at different locations, including an estimated 80 men in the house of the district head, a witness said. In the days and weeks following the attack, some of the men were forced to dispose of bodies left on the streets and in the market area. Scores of bodies were dumped into a nearby river and makeshift graves, among other locations. A witness forced to participate in the operation said he saw hundreds of bodies.

    One teacher who had escaped from the primary school but was recaptured soon after told Human Rights Watch, “I was held captive by [Boko Haram] for at least six days…Corpses were on the street. They forced us to carry [the corpses] and go and dispose of them in the river and there is nothing one could do about it.” The insurgents shot several people who tried to escape by jumping into the river. One man who escaped by swimming across the river said, “Those that were able to swim escaped and those that couldn’t held on to the grass, and they were shot.”

    Video footage and satellite imagery taken in late December 2014, obtained and analyzed by Human Rights Watch, confirms the presence of corpses in the riverbed.

    Nigerian soldiers turned back a number of those who tried to flee to Maiduguri and other locations. The soldiers apparently were suspicious that Boko Haram insurgents might be hidden among those fleeing. A farmer who attempted to reach Maiduguri in a vehicle said that soldiers at a military checkpoint forced him and others back: “The soldiers turned people back to Damasak. They would not allow you to leave and if you tried, [the soldiers] would smash your car and burst your tires. So you had to look for another way out around the town or [try to cross] the river, if you can swim. It was terrible.”

    Between March 13 and 15, 2015, soldiers from neighboring Chad and Niger advanced on Damasak as part of a cross-border military operation against the insurgents. As the troops approached, Boko Haram fled from Damasak, taking with them the 300 children and an estimated 100 more women and children they had been holding captive there.

    The soldiers from Chad and Niger discovered scores of decomposing bodies near a bridge. Days later they brought journalists to the town to film and photograph the bodies. At least 70 bodies were counted in that one location. A local government assessment team discovered another 400 bodies in shallow graves and on the streets of the town a month later. When Nigerien and Chadian forces left the town, Boko Haram returned. The Nigerian government claimed in December that Boko Haram had been “technically defeated.” But former residents said the insurgents were still occupying Damasak.

    Six witnesses now in Maiduguri whose children or other relatives were among those abducted told Human Rights Watch than none had been returned. Some parents have received information from Nigerian refugees in Chad that their children were seen with Boko Haram in Mari and Dogon Chikum, near the Nigerian border with Chad, though Human Rights Watch could not independently confirm this information. “There is no one you can go and cry to since the military have not gone to attack those places,” said one man who had lost relatives.

    The Nigerian government has an obligation under domestic law as well as under international human rights law to take measures to protect its citizens from Boko Haram’s serious human rights abuses. The government has a corresponding responsibility to take effective steps to secure the release of the people Boko Haram has abducted from Damasak.

    Boko Haram has committed widespread abuses during its six-year conflict with the Nigerian government. Its forces have indiscriminately killed civilians, abducted hundreds of women and girls, and destroyed villages and towns, as well as more than 900 schools.

    “Whatever its grievances against the Nigerian government, Boko Haram cannot justify the abduction of young children,” Segun said. “Boko Haram leaders should immediately release everyone the group has abducted, cease all attacks on civilians, and stop using schools in support of its military efforts.”

    For more Human Rights Watch reporting on Nigeria, please visit: https://www.hrw.org/africa/nigeria


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Chad


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    Source: World Food Programme, UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Burkina Faso, Mali

    OUAGADOUGOU - Le Programme alimentaire mondial (PAM) et le Haut-Commissariat des Nations Unies pour les Réfugiés (HCR) avertissent que si de nouvelles contributions ne sont pas reçues d’urgence, 31 000 réfugiés maliens risquent d'être privés d’assistance alimentaire durant les trois prochains mois. La période de soudure qui approche est le moment où ils sont tout particulièrement vulnérables et ont le plus besoin de soutien.

    Depuis 2012, les deux organisations travaillent en étroite collaboration avec le gouvernement du Burkina Faso et les organisations non-gouvernementales pour venir en aide aux réfugiés qui ont fui le conflit au nord du Mali.

    En 2015, le PAM a fourni une assistance alimentaire à plus de 31.000 réfugiés maliens, composée de vivres et de transferts monétaires (en espèces). En 2016, faute de ressources suffisantes, le PAM n’a pas pu fournir l’assistance alimentaire en espèces et les rations alimentaires ont été réduites.

    "La plupart des réfugiés dans les camps dépendent uniquement de l'assistance humanitaire pour survivre. Lorsque cette assistance est réduite ou interrompue, leur état alimentaire et nutritionnel se détériore sévèrement, en particulier en ce qui concerne les femmes, les enfants et les personnes âgées. Le constat actuel est que certains ont recours à des stratégie de survie extrêmes, tel que contracter d’importantes dettes pour acheter des vivres», a déclaré Jean-Charles Dei, Représentant du PAM au Burkina Faso.

    Selon une récente étude menée par le HCR et KALYTA, les taux d'intérêt annuels des usuriers s’élevaient en 2015 à environ 1 000 pour cent.

    "Ce moment est crucial parce que les gens se préparent à entrer dans la période difficile de soudure. Les réfugiés ont besoin de soutien maintenant, plus que jamais. Si rien n’est fait, la situation pourrait avoir des conséquences dramatiques. Le PAM a besoin de toute urgence de 2,5 millions de dollars américains pour apporter aux réfugiés maliens l’assistance dont ils ont besoin pour survivre », a ajouté le Représentant du PAM.

    "Dans la mesure où la situation dans le nord du pays demeure instable, nous nous attendons à ce que peu de réfugiés retournent au Mali en 2016. Les réfugiés maliens au Burkina Faso dépendent de nous. La mobilisation des ressources est très importante pour continuer à leur apporter une assistance et sauver des vies. Depuis 2012, il y a eu des améliorations constantes en termes d'accès à l'assistance alimentaire et nutritionnelle dans les deux camps officiels de réfugiés du pays. Ceci est le résultat d’efforts conjoints qui doivent être maintenus," a déclaré Gogo Hukportie, Représentante du HCR au Burkina Faso.

    Les réfugiés maliens sont déjà exposés aux effets néfastes des sécheresses récurrentes, aux inondations et à la pauvreté chronique. Ils ont un accès limité à l'emploi et aux ressources naturelles. Sans soutien de la communauté internationale, il y a beaucoup de risques que ces populations aient recours à des stratégies désespérées, comme le ralliement des jeunes aux groupes armés.

    # # #

    Le PAM est la plus grande agence humanitaire pour la lutte contre la faim dans le monde, fournissant une assistance alimentaire dans les situations d'urgence et travaillant avec les communautés pour améliorer la nutrition et renforcer la résilience. Chaque année, le PAM aide quelques 80 millions de personnes dans plus de 80 pays.

    Le HCR dirige et coordonne l'action internationale pour la protection mondiale des personnes obligées de fuir, sauvegarde les droits et le bien-être des réfugiés. Pendant plus de six décennies, dans presque toutes les crises majeures de déplacement, le HCR a aidé des dizaines de millions de personnes déracinées, en fournissant des solutions durables à leurs situations difficiles.

    Pour plus d'information veuillez contacter:

    PAM Burkina Faso Jean-Charles Dei, Représentant, jean-charles.dei@wfp.org, Tél. +226 25306077 HCR Burkina Faso Gogo Hukportie, Représentant, hukportie@unhcr.org, Tél. +226 25361028/29/31


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, CCCM Cluster, Shelter Cluster
    Country: Chad

    Le groupe sectoriel humanitaire Abris et Coordination et Gestion sur les lieux de déplacement dont le HCR est chef de file a achevé une série de formations à l’intention des différents acteurs impliqués dans le soutien et a l’appui aux populations déplacées dans la région du Lac.

    Ces formations dont la dernière session a eu lieu jeudi 24 mars 2016 dans les locaux du HCR à N’Djamena « ont permis d’outiller les participants à faire des évaluations rapides sur les lieux de déplacement dont certains ne sont accessibles que par les autorités locales (préfets, sous-préfets, chef de cantons…) et le personnel de certaines ONGs locales », a expliqué Sahdia Khan, responsable de ce groupe sectoriel au HCR.

    Elle a ajouté qu’avec les données collectées sur les lieux de déplacement, les acteurs humanitaires pourront ainsi prioriser les besoins dans le cadre d’une intervention multisectorielle en faveur des personnes déplacées.

    Outre les autorités locales et le personnel des ONGs tchadiennes, qui sont en première ligne dans le soutien aux personnes déplacées, des représentants des agences des Nations Unies et des ONG internationales ainsi que les chefs de certaines communautés de déplacés ont aussi pris part aux formations.

    Les premières sessions ont été organisées à Baga Sola, plus près des populations concernées bénéficiaires, du 14 au 18 mars en collaboration avec l’OIM, qui co-facilite le groupe sectoriel. Au premier jour, une forte participation des représentants des structures étatiques a donné le ton à une formation réussie.


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Niger


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    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Mali

    Kidal, Mali | AFP | Tuesday 3/29/2016 - 15:07 GMT

    by Serge DANIEL

    Former rebels in Mali held a failed reconciliation forum in their northern bastion of Kidal which was boycotted by the government, as the UN warned of an "alarming" security situation.

    Pro-Bamako armed groups also shunned this week's meeting after the Coordination of Movements of the Azawad (CMA) ex-rebels allegedly refused the government's conditions that troops should be allowed into the city and the national flag be flown.

    "We aren't going to go to Kidal as if it is another country, that's not possible," a government minister told AFP.

    The government has not had any presence in Kidal for several years and the army was driven out in 2014.

    The forum brought together those sympathetic to the primarily Tuareg rebels' cause from as far as Mauritania, with discussions centred on establishing a better climate for future talks and calls for greater freedom of movement in the surrounding area.

    "We want to create a climate of understanding between the communities, which is indispensable for implementing the peace deal," CMA leader Alghabass Ag Intalla said in a speech.

    Although a landmark peace agreement was reached last year between the government and the rebels, the CMA has since violently clashed with pro-government armed groups, the so-called "Platform."

    Subsequent "pacts of honour" have toned down their fighting but Mali is wracked by a raging jihadist insurgency that has widened despite Islamists being routed from northern towns in 2013.

    On Tuesday, two Malian soldiers were killed and two others injured when the vehicle they were travelling in was blown up by an explosive device in the Timbuktu region, to the west of Kidal.

    UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said Monday he was "concerned that actual progress in the implementation of the peace agreement remains limited."

    Aside from dealing with the ex-rebels, he said, "the northern and central parts of Mali remain under the threat of criminal, violent extremist and terrorist groups, which take advantage of the limited presence of Malian law enforcement institutions."

    Mali's vast, desolate north fell under the control of the Tuareg-led rebels who allied with jihadist groups linked to Al-Qaeda in 2012.

    The Islamists were largely ousted by an ongoing French-led military operation launched in January 2013, although they have since launched sporadic attacks on security forces from desert hideouts.

    However, rival armed factions and smuggling networks mean the region has struggled for stability since the west African nation gained independence in 1960.

    str-sd/sst/jom/ach

    © 1994-2016 Agence France-Presse


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    Source: Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development
    Country: Mali

    Après une première intervention en 2015, ACTED continue d’apporter en 2016 une assistance multisectorielle aux 2200 réfugiés et 400 demandeurs d’asile à Bamako et à Faragouaran (région de Sikasso, au sud de Bamako) grâce au renouvellement de l’appui de l’Agence des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés (UNHCR). Dans l’optique de renforcer l’autonomisation et l’intégration locale des réfugiés, ACTED les soutient dans l’accès aux soins de santé, à l’éducation, à des formations professionnelles ou encore les aide dans le développement d’une activité génératrice de revenus. Dans ce cadre, ACTED participe aussi à l’amélioration de l’auto-gestion communautaire et au soutien des victimes de violence sexuelles.


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    Source: International Organization for Migration, UN High Commissioner for Refugees, CCCM Cluster, Shelter Cluster
    Country: Chad, Nigeria

    INFORMATION GENERALE

    Date de l'evaluation: 8-­Mar‐2016

    Région: Lac

    Departement: Mamdi

    Sous-­‐préfecture: Kangalam

    Lieu de déplacement: Dar Al amné

    Type de lieu de déplacement: Site isolé

    1er Ville/Village le plus proche: Village Bibi 2 Km

    2e Ville/Village le plus proche: Ville Bagasola 15 Km

    Réseaux disponibles: Tigo, Airtel


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    Source: International Organization for Migration, UN High Commissioner for Refugees, CCCM Cluster, Shelter Cluster
    Country: Chad, Nigeria

    INFORMATION GENERALE

    Date de l'evaluation: 8-­Mar‐2016

    Région: Lac

    Departement: Mamdi

    Sous-­‐préfecture: Kangalam

    Lieu de déplacement: Dar Al amné

    Type de lieu de déplacement: Site isolé

    1er Ville/Village le plus proche: Village Bibi 2 Km

    2e Ville/Village le plus proche: Ville Bagasola 15 Km

    Réseaux disponibles: Tigo, Airtel


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Guinea, Mali, Uganda

    CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC
    SUSPECTED LRA GUNMEN ABDUCT VILLAGERS

    Suspected Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) gunmen on 22 March abducted 14 men in a village in the eastern Haut-Mbomou Prefecture, but later released 12 of them. Separately, a 16-year-old boy is under medical treatment after recently escaping the LRA after three years in captivity. So far this year, the gunmen have abducted nearly twice as many people as in the whole of 2015. Scores of villages have been looted and thousands of people displaced, including some 2,200 people who have fled their homes in surrounding villages to Bria, the capital of the central Haut-Kotto Province.

    CÔTE D’IVOIRE
    SEVERAL KILLED IN INTERCOMMUNITY CLASHES

    Serious clashes between Peuhl and Lobi communities in the north-eastern Bouna area have left several dead amidst a rapidly deteriorating security situation. Since 13 February, violent incidents have been reported in numerous localities around Bouna. Lobi farmers have been targeting Peuhl and Malinke herder communities, destroying homes and property and causing displacements on accusations that their crops have been destroyed by cattle. Humanitarian agencies have conducted a rapid assessment which identified 2,200 displaced people. Assistance is being provided.

    MALI
    EU TRAINING MISSION HQ ATTACKED

    Armed men on 21 March attacked a hotel in Bamako hosting the European Union Training Mission in Mali. The attack was repelled and there were no casualty on the mission’s personnel. One of the assailants was killed during the raid and 21 people later arrested. Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb claimed responsibility.

    CHAD
    SUSPECTED BOKO HARAM MEMBERS SURRENDER

    On 21 March, 16 suspected Boko Haram members said to be from Niger surrendered to the local authorities in Kaiga-Kindjiria area of the western Lac Region. The three men, five women and eight children are currently in the hands of a local chief and will soon be transferred to the administrative authorities. It is the second surrender in recent weeks. Another group of suspected Boko Haram members met with a local Chadian military official in Mboma in Lac Region on 11 February to discuss surrender.

    EBOLA VIRUS DISEASE
    NEW CASE CONFIRMED IN GUINEA

    A new case was confirmed on 28 March. The individual was on the list of contacts considered to be high risk. So far seven people have died since the flare-up was confirmed on 17 March: (4 confirmed and 3 probable cases). Some 1,033 contacts from over 180 households are being monitored, out of them, 175 are high risk. Some 465 contacts have been vaccinated, including the 175 high risk contacts since the vaccination drive began on 23 March.


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Guinea, Mali, Uganda

    RÉPUBLIQUE CENTRAFRICAINE
    ENLÈVEMENT DE VILLAGEOIS PAR DES HOMMES ARMÉS PRÉSUMÉS DE LA LRA

    Des hommes armés suspectés d’appartenir à l’Armée de Résistance du Seigneur (LRA) ont enlevé le 22 mars 14 hommes dans un village à l'est de la préfecture du Haut-Mbomou, en libérant 12 par la suite. Par ailleurs, un garçon de 16 ans est sous traitement médical après avoir récemment échappé à la LRA après trois ans en captivité. Jusqu‘ici cette année, les hommes armés ont enlevé presque deux fois plus de personnes que durant toute l’année 2015. Des dizaines de villages ont été pillés et des milliers de personnes déplacées, y compris quelques 2 200 personnes qui ont fui leurs foyers des villages environnants vers Bria, la capitale de la province centrale de la Haute-Kotto.

    CÔTE D’IVOIRE
    PLUSIEURS TUÉS DANS DES AFFRONTEMENTS INTERCOMMUNAUTAIRES

    De graves affrontements entre les communautés Peuhl et Lobi dans la région nord-est de Bouna ont fait plusieurs morts au cœur d'une situation sécuritaire qui se détériore rapidement. Depuis le 13 février, des incidents violents ont été signalés dans de nombreuses localités autour de Bouna.
    Les agriculteurs Lobi ont pris pour cible les communautés d'éleveurs Peulh et Malinké, détruisant des maisons et des biens et provoquant des déplacements, sous prétexte que leurs cultures avaient été détruites par du bétail. Les agences humanitaires ont mené une évaluation rapide qui a identifié 2 200 personnes déplacées. Une assistance est en cours.

    MALI
    ATTAQUE DE LA MISSION DE FORMATION DE L’UE

    Des hommes armés ont attaqué le 21 mars un hôtel à Bamako abritant la Mission de formation de l'Union européenne au Mali. L'attaque a été repoussée et il n'y avait aucune victime parmi le personnel de la mission. Un des assaillants a été tué durant le raid et 21 personnes arrêtées plus tard. AlQaïda au Maghreb islamique a revendiqué l’attaque.

    TCHAD
    DES MEMBRES PRÉSUMÉS DE BOKO HARAM SE RENDENT

    Le 21 mars, 16 membres présumés de Boko Haram déclarant être du Niger se sont rendus aux autorités locales dans la région de Kaiga-Kindjiria dans la région occidentale du Lac. Les trois hommes, cinq femmes et huit enfants sont actuellement entre les mains d'un chef local et seront bientôt transférés aux autorités administratives. Il s’agit de la deuxième reddition au cours des dernières semaines. Le 11 février, un autre groupe de membres présumés de Boko Haram avait rencontré un responsable militaire tchadien local à Mboma, dans la région du Lac, pour discuter de leur reddition.

    MALADIE À VIRUS EBOLA (MVE)
    NOUVEAU CAS EN GUINÉE

    Un nouveau cas a été confirmé le 28 mars. L'individu était sur la liste des contacts considérés comme à haut risque. Jusqu‘ici, sept personnes, dont quatre cas confirmés et trois probables, sont décédées depuis la confirmation de la résurgence du virus le 17 mars: (4 cas confirmés et 3 probables). Quelques 1 033 contacts issus de plus de 180 ménages sont suivis, 175 parmi eux sont considérés à haut risque. Quelques 465 contacts ont été vaccinés, y compris les 175 contacts à haut risque, depuis le début de la campagne de vaccination le 23 mars.


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    Source: UN Children's Fund, Protection Cluster
    Country: Nigeria


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Libya, Niger, Nigeria, Sudan

    I. CONTEXTE ET OBJECTIF

    Le Tchad, depuis plus d’une décennie, fait face à des crises répétées et complexes, avec des conséquences humanitaires graves. Les besoins humanitaires pour l’année 2015-16 peuvent être catégorisés en quatre thématiques principales: les mouvements de population, l’insécurité alimentaire et la malnutrition, les urgences sanitaires et les catastrophes naturelles. L’instabilité récurrente et les conflits successifs dans les pays voisins ont provoqué le déplacement d’un nombre élevé de personnes de la Centrafrique, du Nigeria, du Soudan, de la Lybie et du Niger. Il est estimé que près de 650 000 personnes seront directement affectées par les mouvements de population incluant les réfugiés, retournés et déplacés internes.

    L’insécurité alimentaire et la malnutrition affectent plus de 3,4 millions de personnes principalement établies dans les régions de la bande sahélienne, parmi lesquelles 1,6 million a besoin d’une assistance humanitaire, dont 663 000 (5%) ont besoin d’une assistance humanitaire d’urgence. La situation nutritionnelle est également préoccupante avec une prévision de près de 400 000 enfants atteints de malnutrition aigüe modérée (MAM) et plus de 320 000 enfants atteints de malnutrition aigüe sévère (MAS) pour 2016 nécessitant une prise en charge nutritionnelle urgente.

    La forte prévalence des maladies à potentiel épidémique, telles que le choléra et la rougeole, entraîne une morbidité et de nombreux décès parmi la population dans un pays où l’accès aux soins de santé est faible en raison de la faiblesse du système de santé. Au premier semestre 2015, près de 390 000 personnes ont été atteintes de paludisme ou de rougeole. La faible couverture vaccinale renforce la vulnérabilité des femmes, des enfants, des populations nomades et des populations déplacées.

    Les catastrophes naturelles (inondations, sécheresses et ennemis de culture) sont récurrentes et de plus en plus fréquentes au Tchad. Le manque de dispositifs de préparation rend encore plus vulnérables des populations vivant déjà dans la précarité. Elles ont impact direct sur la production agricole et les moyens de subsistance, qui, en plus du manque de dispositifs de préparation, démultiplient la vulnérabilité des communautés sinistrées.

    Les trois contingences (risques) spécifiques identifiées pour le Tchad pourraient affecter plus d’1,5 millions de personnes si une alerte était lancée pour chacune d’elle, à savoir : mouvements de population (160 500 personnes touchées et 600 000 touchées indirectement), troubles socio-économiques (480 000 personnes) ainsi que les catastrophes naturelles (900 000 personnes).

    Ce plan de contingence inter-agence, étant une part essentielle de la préparation aux urgences et de la réduction des risques de catastrophes, permettra d’assurer une compréhension commune des 3 contingences par les acteurs humanitaires, d’identifier les contraintes opérationnelles et de disposer d’une base de préparation (actions rapides) pour améliorer la qualité de l’intervention dans les 3 à 4 semaines après le déclenchement d’une alerte humanitaire.

    Le Plan de contingence étant un processus dynamique, il sera révisé pour s’assurer que les problèmes sont anticipés, la coordination renforcée et efficace, les contraintes clairement identifiées et les rôles et responsabilités clarifiés et compris.


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    Source: UN Children's Fund
    Country: Cameroon, Central African Republic, Nigeria

    Highlights:

    • According to Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) survey conducted by IOM, the total number of Internal Displaced Persons located in the Far North region is 169,970 from which 137,715 are displaced for security reasons. Compared to the DTM survey of November 2015, this represents an additional caseload of more than 28,000 persons.

    • So far in 2016, 454 unaccompanied and separated children (out of 4,650 expected children) are receiving interim care and follow-up through UNICEF support.

    • Through UNICEF and its partners, 24,300 children (7,146 IDPs, 4,059 Nigerian refugees and 13,095 CAR refugees) benefit from psychosocial support.

    • Through partners from the Education sector, more than 58,700 children (11,046 IDPs, 12,921 Nigerian refugees and 34,768 CAR refugees) have access to education.

    • Additional funding is needed to ensure that UNICEF and partners reach their objectives and address urgent lifesaving and protection needs.

    SITUATION IN NUMBERS

    194,517 MALNOURISHED CHILDREN
    61,262 with Severe Acute Malnutrition
    33,255 with Moderate Acute Malnutrition
    (UNICEF-MOH, SMART 2015)

    267,148 CAR REFUGEES
    76,626 in refugee sites
    175,611 outside refugee sites
    (UNHCR, January 2016)

    72,062 NIGERIAN REFUGEES
    56,210 n the Minawao refugee camp
    3,829 arrived since January 2016
    (UNHCR, February 2016)

    169,970 INTERNALLY DISPLACED PERSONS
    137,715 displacements caused by the conflict
    (IOM, February 2016)

    Humanitarian leadership and coordination

    • At the national level, emergency coordination is led by the Humanitarian / Resident Coordinator (HC/RC) and supported by OCHA. Under the leadership of OCHA, humanitarian needs and humanitarian strategic response plans are monitored through the HRP (Humanitarian Response Plan) process. The HNO-HRP was officially endorsed by the Government of Cameroon and the HCT in January 2016 (www.humanitarianresponse.info/en/operations/cameroon).

    • With regards to the Sahel nutrition crisis, Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) and epidemic emergencies, UNICEF and the Government are co-leading the nutrition, WASH and education sectors, as well as the sub-sectoral group for child protection. The sectoral groups meet on a regular basis both at the central and field levels. The WASH Sector group is reinforcing its information management capacities with the support of the Global WASH Cluster.

    • Emergency responses related to Nigerian and CAR refugees are coordinated by the Government of Cameroon and UNHCR. UNICEF actively participates at the central and field levels in sectorial and multi-sectorial coordination fora.

    Humanitarian Strategy

    Since 2014, UNICEF has focused on the implementation of an integrated emergency response package for people suffering from chronic vulnerabilities, including refugees, IDPs and host communities. In order to facilitate and support its emergency responses, UNICEF has established a permanent presence in Bertoua in the East region and in Maroua in the Far North region.

    With regards to the displacement of refugees, IDPs and host populations, UNICEF implements an emergency response focusing on child protection and education to ensure that children are protected and fulfil their rights in a safe environment. These activities are complemented by specific lifesaving interventions in the fields of WASH, health and HIV, and nutrition.

    With regards to the nutrition crisis, UNICEF and partners are implementing an integrated strategy which aims to reduce suffering of children and women affected by Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM) as well as to decrease the overall prevalence of acute malnutrition. The strategy focuses on the reinforcement of the screening and case management of SAM patients and on related interventions in other fields such as WASH (to decrease childhood illnesses that are directly linked to the incidence of malnutrition), HIV (screening and referral of HIV positive children) and protection (emotional stimulation and psychosocial support).


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    Source: Armed Conflict Location and Events Dataset
    Country: Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia, Libya, Namibia, Nigeria, South Sudan, Tunisia, Uganda, World

    Welcome to the March issue of the Armed Conflict Location & Event Data Project’s (ACLED) Conflict Trends report. Each month, ACLED researchers gather, analyse and publish data on political violence in Africa in realtime. Weekly updates to realtime conflict event data are published on the ACLED website, and are also available through our research partners at Climate Change and African Political Stability (CCAPS).

    This month’s issue focuses on ADF and FDLR violence in Democratic Republic of Congo, the largely peaceful protests against the expansion of Addis Ababa and the security forces response in Ethiopia, territorial gains made by General Khalifah Haftar’s military forces in Benghazi, Libya, the wide geography of riots and protests by Children of the Liberation Struggle (CLS) in Namibia, the peace process in South Sudan, spikes in protest and low-level Islamist insurgency in Tunisia and election-based violence in Uganda.

    Elsewhere on the continent, police abuses against political and non-political figures in Egypt persist,
    Boko Haram escalated the intensity of attacks in Borno State, Nigeria, and violence continues to decrease in Central African Republic.


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