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ReliefWeb - Updates

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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, REACH Initiative
    Country: Niger


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, REACH Initiative
    Country: Niger


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, REACH Initiative
    Country: Niger


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, REACH Initiative
    Country: Niger


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, REACH Initiative
    Country: Niger


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, REACH Initiative
    Country: Niger


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, REACH Initiative
    Country: Niger


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, REACH Initiative
    Country: Niger


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, REACH Initiative
    Country: Niger


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, REACH Initiative
    Country: Niger


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Niger, Nigeria

    • Le village nigérian d’Assaga, situé en bordure de la rivière Komadougou, à 15 km à l’est de Diffa, a été attaqué dans la nuit du 27 juin par des présumés insurgés de la secte Boko Haram.

    • Cette attaque est la troisième enregistrée en deux semaines dans la région de Diffa1 .

    • Dix personnes ont été tuées et neuf autres blessées.

    • L’attaque a engendré le mouvement de l’ensemble de la population du village d’Assaga, ainsi que des populations de sept autres villages du côté du Nigéria et d’Assaga au Niger.

    • Un total de 641 ménages2 (3 000 personnes) dont 203 ménages de nationalité nigériane et 438 composés de Nigériens retournés du Nigéria et de personnes déplacées internes en provenance d’Assaga au Niger, s’est installé sur un site3 près de la route principale.

    • Pour l’instant, les populations déplacées survivent grâce à la solidarité des résidents.

    • Une mission d’évaluation rapide conjointe constituée du Comité régional de gestion et de coordination des réfugiés et de l’OCHA s’est rendue sur le site d’accueil des déplacés le 1er juillet pour estimer les besoins afin d’établir un plan de réponse. Des besoins en vivres, eau, hygiène, abris et biens non alimentaires et soutien psycho-social ont été identifiés.


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Niger, Nigeria

    • The Nigerian village of Assaga located along the Komadougou River about 15 km East of Diffa, was attacked on the night of 27 June presumably by the insurgents.

    • This is the third attack recorded in two weeks in the region of Diffa1 .

    • Ten people were killed and nine others wounded.

    • The attack caused the displacement of the entire population of the Assaga village as well as the population of seven other villages on Nigerian soil and Assaga in Niger.

    • A total of 641 households (3,000 people) of which 203 are Nigerian households and 438 composed of Nigerien returnees, internally displaced people from Assaga in Niger and 2013 flood victims families are currently on a site2 by the main road.

    • For now, the displaced population survives through the solidarity of the host-population.

    • A rapid joint assessment mission consisting of the Regional Committee for Refugees Management and Coordination and OCHA visited the site on 1 July to assess needs in order to establish a response plan. The needs identified are food, water, sanitation, shelter and non-food items as well as protection.


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Niger


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    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Nigeria

    Kano, Nigeria | AFP | Friday 7/3/2015 - 12:26 GMT

    A young female suicide bomber killed 12 worshippers when she blew herself up in a mosque in northeastern Nigeria, a witness and a vigilante aiding the military against Boko Haram said Friday.

    "The bomber was a girl aged around 15 who was seen around the mosque when worshippers were preparing for the afternoon prayers," vigilante Danlami Ajaokuta said of Thursday's attack in Malari village, adding 12 had died and seven were injured.

    "People asked her to leave because she had no business there and they were not‎ comfortable with her in view of the spate of suicide attacks by female Boko Haram members.

    "She made to leave‎ but while the people were inside the mosque for the prayers she ran from a distance into the mosque and blew herself up," he added -- an account corroborated by resident Gajimi Mala.

    There was no immediate claim of responsibility but Boko Haram has used both men and young women and girls as human bombs in the past, and Borno state where the attack took place has been the hardest hit by the insurgency.

    The attack comes just a day after Boko Haram militants gunned down at least 145 people in three Borno villages, shooting Muslim worshippers during the holy month of Ramadan in the bloodiest day of attacks since new President Muhammadu Buhari came to power.

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    © 1994-2015 Agence France-Presse


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    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Nigeria

    Kano, Nigeria | AFP | Friday 7/3/2015 - 21:28 GMT

    by Aminu Abubakar with Ola Awoniyi in Abuja

    Boko Haram carried out a fresh wave of massacres in northeastern Nigeria on Friday, locals said, killing nearly 200 people in 48 hours of violence President Muhammadu Buhari blasted as "inhuman and barbaric".

    The militants have staged multiple attacks across restive Borno state since Wednesday, gunning down worshippers at evening Ramadan prayers, shooting women in their homes, and dragging men from their beds in the dead of night.

    A young female suicide bomber also killed 12 worshippers when she blew herself up in a mosque in Borno. While there was no immediate claim of responsibility, Boko Haram has used both men and young women and girls as human bombs in the past.

    And as night fell, Nigerian troops battled "hordes of Boko Haram gunmen" who seemed set on attacking the state capital Maiduguri, the birthplace of the extremist Islamist movement.

    "President Muhammadu Buhari has condemned the latest wave of killings... describing them as most inhuman and barbaric," the presidency said in a statement.

    The bloodshed is the worst since Buhari came to power in May, vowing to root out the insurgency that has claimed more than 15,000 lives.

    Up to 50 armed men on motorbikes stormed the village of Mussa in the latest atrocity on Friday, shooting villagers and burning their homes, survivor Bitrus Dangana told AFP.

    "They killed six people in the village and they chased the inhabitants into the bush, firing at them... 25 people were killed in the bush," he said.

    Another survivor, Adamu Bulus, confirmed 31 people had been murdered.

    It was the fourth time that Boko Haram had attacked the village in the past year, local youth worker Sunday Wabba told AFP, describing how they "killed everyone on sight".

    • Bodies 'lying unattended' -

    News of the massacres first emerged on Thursday, when survivors told of raids on three different villages in Borno state the previous evening that left at least 145 people dead and many houses burnt to the ground.

    On Friday, fresh details of the killings emerged from a resident of Kukawa, near lake Chad, the worst-affected village.

    Baana Kole told AFP that he and others had managed to escape into the bush where they spent the night, before returning to bury the dead, only to find that the militants had laid mines everywhere.

    "Some residents who hid in trees saw them planting the mines and alerted us when we returned to the village and started burying our dead," he said.

    "So many dead bodies are still in Kukawa lying unattended. We had to abandon them because we could not carry them with us."

    Less than 24 hours later, a girl blew herself up in a mosque in Malari village, more than 150 kilometres away from Wednesday's attacks.

    "The bomber was a girl aged around 15 who was seen around the mosque when worshippers were preparing for the afternoon prayers," Danlami Ajaokuta, a vigilante assisting the military against Boko Haram, told AFP.

    "People asked her to leave because she had no business there and they were not‎ comfortable with her in view of the spate of suicide attacks by female Boko Haram members.

    "She made to leave‎ but while the people were inside the mosque for the prayers she ran from a distance into the mosque and blew herself up," he added -- an account corroborated by resident Gajimi Mala.

    • Boko Haram has 're-grouped' -

    Early Friday morning, as people were sleeping, Boko Haram militants dragged men out of houses in Miringa village and shot them for escaping forced conscription.

    They "picked 13 men from selected homes and took them to the Eid prayer ground outside the village where they opened fire on them," resident Baballe Mohammed said, adding 11 died and two managed to escape.

    He and another resident said the victims had been targeted because they had fled their home village after Boko Haram tried to force them to join their ranks.

    Then on Friday evening, local vigilantes said Nigerian troops were battling Boko Haram fighters in Zabarmari village, only 10 kilometres (six miles) from Maiduguri, trying to prevent an apparent rebel attempt to enter the city.

    With heavy gunfire and more than 10 loud explosions reported, local resident Zanna Shehuri told AFP, "Boko Haram are now in Zabarmari trying to come into Maiduguri but are facing stiff resistance from soldiers."

    The armed group has intensified its campaign of violence since Buhari came to power on May 29, launching raids, explosions and suicide attacks that have claimed over 450 lives.

    The spike in violence has sparked concern that earlier victories claimed by the armies of Nigeria, Niger, Chad and Cameroon in the region are being eroded.

    The four countries -- all of which border Lake Chad, a focal point of Boko Haram unrest -- launched offensives against the militants early this year as it became apparent that the armed group was making big gains in Nigeria.

    They managed to push the militants out of captured towns and villages, but the recent attacks highlight that Boko Haram is not defeated.

    A new regional fighting force comprising 8,700 troops from Nigeria, Niger, Chad, Cameroon and Benin is due to deploy at the end of the month.

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    © 1994-2015 Agence France-Presse


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Gambia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal


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    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Chad

    N'Djamena, Tchad | AFP | vendredi 03/07/2015 - 14:56 GMT

    Les autorités tchadiennes ont découvert à N'Djamena un important stock d'armes au domicile d'un membre présumé du groupe islamiste nigérian Boko Haram, a indiqué vendredi à l'AFP le porte-parole de la police nationale tchadienne, Paul Manga.

    "Suite à des informations que nous avons reçues, la police a fait jeudi une descente au domicile du terroriste Moussa Oumar, tué par les forces de défense et de sécurité le lundi 29 juin au quartier Guinebor", dans la capitale, a indiqué Paul Manga.

    "Cette opération a permis aux forces de l'ordre de mettre la main sur des roquettes, des obus de mortiers, des lance-roquettes, des fusils AK47, et des caisses de munitions de tous calibres. Le tout enfoui dans un grand trou et couvert par une dalle", a précisé le porte-parole.

    Dimanche soir, un chef islamiste local, présenté comme le "cerveau" de Boko Haram "au Tchad et au Nord-Cameroun", avait été arrêté avec plusieurs complices dans le cadre de l'enquête ouverte après le double attentat, attribué aux islamistes, qui avait fait 38 morts le 15 juin dans la capitale, selon le gouvernement tchadien.

    Sur la base des informations recueillies après ces arrestations, la police avait effectué lundi matin une descente dans une maison où étaient fabriquées "des bombes artisanales". 11 personnes, dont cinq policiers et six membres présumés de Boko Haram, avaient été tuées durant cette opération.

    "Cette découverte (de la cache d'armes) laisse présager l'imminence d'une nouvelle attaque contre N'Djamena", a affirmé vendredi à l'AFP une source policière qui a requis l'anonymat.

    Selon cette source, "depuis l'arrestation du présumé +cerveau+, la police a interpellé plusieurs autres personnes".

    Le parquet de N'Djamena avait déjà indiqué la semaine dernière avoir procédé à l'arrestation d'une soixantaine de personnes dans l'enquête sur le double attentat de N'Djamena.

    L'armée tchadienne est engagée en première ligne dans une opération militaire régionale depuis le début de l'année contre l'insurrection de Boko Haram, qui s'est étendue au-delà du nord-est du Nigeria vers les pays limitrophes: Tchad, Niger et Cameroun.

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    © 1994-2015 Agence France-Presse


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    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Nigeria

    Maiduguri, Nigeria | AFP | Friday 7/3/2015 - 16:36 GMT

    At least 29 people were killed in an Islamist attack on a village in northeast Nigeria's restive Borno state on Friday, a witness said.

    Armed men arrived at the village of Mussa and "killed everyone on sight," Sunday Wabba, a local youth association official, told AFP.

    "We have counted the bodies of 29 people and many others sustained injuries," he added.

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    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Niger

    Zinder, Niger | AFP | Saturday 7/4/2015 - 03:32 GMT

    by Joris FIORITI

    Mourdja's nose has been eaten away, like one lip and part of her upper gum, leaving the 13-year-old girl atrociously disfigured by noma, a disease that thrives on malnutrition.

    "It was better before," the teenager says shyly and simply in the arid heartland of Niger, one of the world's poorest nations, clearly ill at ease and fiddling with her bracelets.

    Mourdja can no longer look people in the eye, her face ravaged by the polymicrobial infection, which began by making her inflamed gums bleed. Just three days later, rapid tissue damage stole her beauty -- along with her childhood.

    "The problem is that this is a very fast-acting disease," says nurse Fati Badamasi, who works for the Swiss NGO Sentinelles, active in Niger since 1992.

    "The necrosis takes hold in 72 hours. If the patient comes to us with a blackish patch (on the face) it's already too late."

    Ali Adah, who oversees the charity's work in the country on the southern edge of the Sahara, speaks of the fearful stench of noma, which "smells of decay, like a corpse".

    "When I come to the office and we have a new case, I smell it straight away," he says.

    • 'Disease born of poverty' -

    Mourdja's flesh gave off that odour after she caught the infection sometimes called oro-facial gangrene, which can break out where food is short and lacks key vitamins and water is polluted.

    Noma also strikes when natural immunity is at its lowest.

    The teenager comes from a "very poor" family in the central Tahoua province, according to Aboubakar Moussa Mato, a social worker with Sentinelles. She lives with her parents and "about 10 brothers and sisters" in a straw hut "with no water or electricity".

    "Noma is caused by malnutrition and a lack of hygiene," nurse Badamasi says. "It is a disease born of poverty. Well, in Niger there is plenty of poverty."

    Niger is prone to food crises and holds the lowest place on the comprehensive Human Development Index drawn up each year by the United Nations Development Programme.

    The birth rate is nonetheless a record 7.6 babies per woman, according to the UN, but in June 2014 more than 15 percent of children under five were famished. Between 4,000 and 6,000 infants die of malnutrition each year.

    Most African countries have faced noma, like Laos in Asia and some South American nations, but Niger accounts for a large part of the 140,000 to 180,000 people infected every year worldwide, according to the UN World Health Organization, whose last complete data dates from 1998.

    The last cases in Europe were recorded during the Second World War in Nazi concentration camps where Allied troops saw the appalling conditions first-hand towards the end of the conflict, says WHO expert Benoit Varenne. "That gives an idea of the kind of infection we're up against."

    Reliable noma statistics for Niger are unavailable, but "90 percent of children die before receiving basic care", says Ibrahim Hamadou, who coordinates the National Programme Against Disease. "That means we only know the remaining 10 percent."

    • 'Half a miracle' -

    With help from Sentinelles, Mourdja will soon be flown to Geneva, where surgeons will rebuild her nose and her mouth. The girl will spend between six months to a year in the Swiss lakeside city for operations and reeducation before coming home.

    Seymi, who lost the whole left side of his face to noma, has already been to Switzerland. Skin and muscle tissue lifted close to his thorax has been grafted over a gaping wound, but the boy remains badly disfigured. The disease ate away one of his eyes.

    "What we do is half a miracle, but it's a very long way from perfect," says Brigitte Pittet, a surgeon and professor in the Geneva University Hospitals public sector group.

    "It is very complex to reconstruct a nose in three dimensions with mucous membranes, the oral walls, the lips," Pittet adds, though there have been improvements down the years. Surgery practised on less badly affected children leaves hardly any trace of the damage.

    Operations are extremely expensive and Niger's authorities are counting on a preventive information campaign and antibiotics.

    "We show mothers frightful pictures to shock them" and incite them to take infected children for the swiftest possible care, Hamadou, a physician, says. "When noma is detected early enough, the results are spectacular."

    This method works. Thanks to a rapid response, about 30 children treated at the end of May at Sentinelle's centre in the southern town of Zinder suffered no more than inflammations of the gums. But peaks of noma are expected with the coming rainy season.

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    © 1994-2015 Agence France-Presse


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    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Mali

    Bamako, Mali | AFP | samedi 04/07/2015 - 20:30 GMT

    Le Comité de suivi de l'accord de paix au Mali déterminera "dans les jours qui viennent" le calendrier pour la mise en oeuvre de ce pacte, a affirmé samedi à l'AFP le chef de la Mission de l'ONU dans le pays (Minusma), Mongi Hamdi.

    Il s'exprimait à l'issue d'une réunion de deux jours de ce comité, présidé par l'Algérie et comprenant des représentants des gouvernements, groupes armés pro-gouvernementaux et rebelles, ainsi que de l'Union européenne (UE), de l'Union africaine (UA) et de la Communauté économique des Etats de l'Afrique de l'Ouest (Cédéao).

    Selon plusieurs participants interrogés par l'AFP à la fin des travaux, cette rencontre - la deuxième du Comité - s'est mieux déroulée que la première, tenue en juin et qui avait tourné court, des dissensions au sein des différents groupes ayant éclaté d'après des témoins.

    "Dans les jours qui viennent, on va faire en sorte de finaliser le règlement intérieur du comité de suivi (de l'accord) et juste après le ramadan, on va commencer la mise en oeuvre de tout l'accord selon un calendrier qui sera déterminé par le comité de suivi dans les jours qui viennent", a déclaré le chef de la Minusma dans un entretien avec l'AFP.

    Selon un responsable de la mission de l'ONU ayant requis l'anonymat, "la rencontre a connu des débuts difficiles mais les choses vont dans le bon sens, de manière positive, en tout cas plus que lors de la première réunion".

    La rencontre a été "positive parce que nous avançons dans les discussions pour garantir la paix à nos populations", a également affirmé Me Harouna Toureh, porte-parole de la plate-forme regroupant les groupes pro-Bamako.

    "Nous sommes vraiment là pour aller de l'avant. Les choses sont dans la bonne direction", a pour sa part dit Mohamed Ould Abdou, de la Coordination des mouvements de l'Azawad (CMA, coalition de groupes rebelles).

    L'accord de paix a été signé le 15 mai à Bamako par le gouvernement malien, les groupes pro-gouvernementaux et la médiation internationale, puis le 20 juin par les groupes rebelles.

    Il vise à instaurer une paix durable dans le nord du Mali, qui a connu une série de rébellions touareg depuis les premières années d'indépendance du pays, en 1960. En 2012, cette vaste région a été transformée en sanctuaire et en base d'opérations jihadiste, jusqu'au lancement à l'initiative de la France, en janvier 2013, d'une intervention militaire internationale, toujours en cours.

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