Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

ReliefWeb - Updates

older | 1 | .... | 390 | 391 | (Page 392) | 393 | 394 | .... | 728 | newer

    0 0

    Source: UN Security Council
    Country: Mali

    SC/11950

    7474th Meeting (AM)

    The Security Council today extended the mandate of the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) until 30 June 2016, within the authorized troop ceiling of 11,240 military personnel, including, for the first time, at least 40 military observers in order to monitor and supervise the country’s ceasefire.

    Unanimously adopting resolution 2227 (2015), the 15-member body decided that the Mission should perform tasks related to, among others, the monitoring and supervision of ceasefire arrangements; supporting the implementation of the Agreement on Peace and Reconciliation in Mali; protecting civilians under imminent threat of physical violence; and assisting the Malian authorities in their efforts to promote and protect human rights.

    Also by the text, the 15-member body expressed its concern at the slow pace of deployment of personnel and equipment of MINUSMA, which had seriously hindered the Mission’s ability to fully implement its mandate since its establishment on 25 April 2013. It nevertheless welcomed efforts by the Secretary-General to accelerate that deployment and to provide adequate training to improve the security and safety of MINUSMA’s personnel in a complex security environment.

    Emphasizing that the Malian authorities had the primary responsibility for the country’s stability and security, the Council welcomed the signing of the Agreement on Peace and Reconciliation in Mali in 2015 by the Government, the Plateforme and coalition armed groups, and the Coordination des Mouvements de l’Azawad coalition of armed groups, as a historic opportunity to achieve lasting peace in Mali. It strongly condemned the violations of the ceasefire by the Malian parties, which had led to loss of life, including of civilians, and displacement and undermined the peace process. It also welcomed the signing of the Arrangement sécuritaire pour une cessation des hostilités on 5 June 2015 by the Government of Mali and the Coordination armed groups.

    Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations, it urged the Government of Mali, the Plateforme and Coordination armed groups to fulfil their commitments under the Agreement on Peace and Reconciliation in Mali, and further urged all parties to immediately and fully respect and uphold the ceasefire agreement of 23 May 2014, the Arrangement sécuritaire pour une cessation des hostilités of 5 June 2015, and the declarations of cessation of hostilities of 19 February 2015 and 24 July 2014.

    The Council further expressed its readiness to consider targeted sanctions against those who undermined the peace process, notably by resuming hostilities, violating the ceasefire, or taking actions to obstruct or threaten the implementation of the Agreement, as well as those who, among other things, attacked and took actions to threaten MINUSMA, international security presences or humanitarian personnel. It demanded that all armed groups in Mali put aside their arms, cease hostilities, reject the recourse to violence, cut off all ties with terrorist organizations and recognize, without conditions, the unity and territorial integrity of the Malian State.

    In a related provision, the Council requested the Secretary-General to take all necessary steps to enable MINUSMA to reach its full operational capacity without further delay. It urged the Mission’s troop- and police-contributing countries to expedite the procurement and deployment of remaining contingent-owned equipment and urged Member States to provide troops and police that had adequate capabilities, training and equipment. It authorized the Secretary-General to take the necessary steps to ensure inter-mission cooperation, notably between MINUSMA, the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL) and the United Nations Operation in Côte d’Ivoire (UNOCI), including appropriate transfer of troops and assets to MINUSMA.

    It authorized French troops, within the limits of their capacities and areas of deployment, to use all necessary means until the end of MINUSMA’s mandate, to intervene in support of the elements of the Mission when under imminent and serious threat upon request of the Secretary-General. It requested France to report to it on implementation of that mandate.

    Finally, it called upon the Malian authorities, with the assistance of MINUSMA and international partners, to address the issue of the proliferation and illicit trafficking of small arms and light weapons.

    Following the resolution’s adoption, the representative of Mali, Sékou Kasse, said that the Council had shaped the new MINUSMA mandate around the effective and integral implementation of the Peace and Reconciliation Accord for Mali, as requested by the country when it addressed the Council recently. In particular, the Council had taken into account the security aspects of the agreement, and stressed the importance of using all available resources to prevent the return of terrorist groups. Given the hard-won agreement reached between parties, it would be appalling if it was wiped out by enemies of peace who carried out terrorist acts in the country. He cited an attack perpetrated on 27 June. In that vein, he expressed solidarity and compassion with Chad and Tunisia, and all other countries that had recently been victimized by terrorism.

    The meeting began at 10 a.m. and ended at 10:10 a.m.

    Resolution

    The full text of resolution 2227 (2015) reads as follows:

    “The Security Council,

    “Recalling its previous resolutions, in particular 2164 (2014) and 2100 (2013), its presidential statements of 6 February 2015 (S/PRST/2015/5), 28 July 2014 (S/PRST/2014/15) and 23 January 2014 (S/PRST/2014/2), and its press statements of 18 June 2015, 29 May 2015, 1 May 2015 and 10 April 2015,

    “Reaffirming its strong commitment to the sovereignty, unity and territorial integrity of Mali, emphasizing that the Malian authorities have primary responsibility for the provision of stability and security throughout the territory of Mali, and underscoring the importance of achieving national ownership of peace- and security-related initiatives,

    “Reaffirming the basic principles of peacekeeping, including consent of the parties, impartiality, and non-use of force, except in self-defence and defence of the mandate, and recognizing that the mandate of each peacekeeping mission is specific to the need and situation of the country concerned,

    “Recognizing the legitimate aspiration of all Malian citizens to enjoy lasting peace and development,

    “Welcoming the signing of the Agreement on Peace and Reconciliation in Mali (« the Agreement ») in 2015 by the Government of Mali, the Plateforme coalition of armed groups, and the Coordination des Mouvements de l’Azawad coalition of armed groups, as a historic opportunity to achieve lasting peace in Mali, and commending the signatories of the Agreement for the courage they demonstrated in this regard,

    “Considering the Agreement as balanced and comprehensive, aiming to address the political, institutional, governance, security, development and reconciliation dimensions of the crisis in Mali, respecting the sovereignty, unity and territorial integrity of the Malian State,

    “Underscoring that the responsibility for the full and effective implementation of the Agreement, which has to be Malian-led and Malian-owned, rests with the Government of Mali, the Plateforme and Coordination armed groups, and will be crucial to contribute to lasting peace in Mali, drawing lessons from previous peace agreements,

    “Commending the role played by Algeria and other members of the international mediation team to facilitate the inter-Malian dialogue which led to the signing of the Agreement by the Government of Mali, the Plateforme and Coordination armed groups, welcoming the signing of the Agreement by the members of the international mediation team, and calling on the members of the Comité de Suivi de l’Accord (CSA) and other relevant international partners to support the implementation of the Agreement and to maintain close coordination to support lasting peace in Mali,

    “Stressing the need for clear, detailed and concrete oversight mechanisms to support the implementation of the Agreement, notably through the CSA and its four subcommittees dealing with political and institutional issues, defence and security, economic, social and cultural development, and reconciliation, justice and humanitarian issues,

    “Strongly condemning the violations of the ceasefire by the Malian parties that occurred in Mali, which led to loss of life, including of civilians, and displacement and undermined the peace process, welcoming the signing of the Arrangement sécuritaire pour une cessation des hostilités on 5 June 2015 by the Government of Mali and the Coordination armed groups, and recalling the ceasefire agreement of 23 May 2014, and the declarations of cessation of hostilities of 19 February 2015 and 24 July 2014 signed by the Malian parties,

    “Reiterating its strong support for the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Mali and for the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) to assist the Malian authorities and the Malian people in their efforts to bring lasting peace and stability to their country, noting the development of the Protection of Civilians strategy of MINUSMA, bearing in mind the primary responsibility of the Malian authorities to protect the population,

    “Commending troop and police contributing countries of MINUSMA for their contribution, paying tribute to the peacekeepers who risk their lives in this respect, strongly condemning attacks against peacekeepers, and underlining that attacks targeting peacekeepers may constitute war crimes under international law,

    “Expressing its concern at the slow pace of deployment of personnel and equipment of MINUSMA, which has seriously hindered its ability to fully implement its mandate since its establishment on 25 April 2013 by its resolution 2100 (2013), welcoming efforts by the Secretary-General to accelerate the deployment of troops and equipment, as well as to provide adequate training, to improve the security and safety of MINUSMA’s personnel in a complex security environment that includes asymmetric threats, notably the use of mines and IEDs,

    “Strongly condemning the activities in Mali and in the Sahel region of terrorist organisations, including Al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), Ansar Eddine, the Movement for Unity and Jihad in West Africa (MUJAO), which continue to operate in Mali and constitute a threat to peace and security in the region and beyond, and human rights abuses and violence against civilians, notably women and children, committed in the North of Mali and in the region by terrorist groups,

    “Stressing that terrorism can only be defeated by a sustained and comprehensive approach involving the active participation and collaboration of all States, and regional and international organisations to impede, impair, and isolate the terrorist threat, and reaffirming that terrorism cannot and should not be associated with any religion, nationality or civilization,

    “Recalling the listing of MUJAO, the Organisation of Al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb, Ansar Eddine and its leader Iyad Ag Ghali, and Al Mourabitoune on the Al-Qaida sanctions list established by the Committee pursuant to resolutions 1267 (1999) and 1989 (2011), and reiterating its readiness, under the above-mentioned regime, to sanction further individuals, groups, undertakings and entities who are associated with Al-Qaida and other listed entities and individuals, including AQIM, MUJAO, Ansar Eddine and Al Mourabitoune, in accordance with the established listing criteria,

    “Welcoming the continued action by the French forces, at the request of the Malian authorities, to deter the terrorist threat in the North of Mali,

    “Noting with growing concern the transnational dimension of the terrorist threat in the Sahel region, underscoring the importance of achieving regional ownership and response in this regard, welcoming in this context the establishment of the Group of Five for the Sahel (G5) and the Nouakchott process on the enhancement of the security cooperation and the operationalization of the African peace and security architecture in the Sahel and Sahara region (APSA), as well as the commitment made by the African leaders at the Malabo Summit of 26-27 June 2014 and steps taken by the African Union to operationalize the African Capacity for Immediate Response to Crisis (ACIRC), and welcoming the efforts of the French forces to support G5 Member States to increase regional counter-terrorism cooperation,

    “Expressing its continued concern over the serious threats posed by transnational organized crime in the Sahel region, including arms and drug trafficking, human trafficking, and its increasing links, in some cases, with terrorism, underlining the responsibility of the countries in the region in addressing these threats, and welcoming the stabilizing effect of the international presence in Mali, including MINUSMA,

    “Strongly condemning the incidents of kidnapping and hostage-taking with the aim of raising funds or gaining political concessions, reiterating its determination to prevent kidnapping and hostage-taking in the Sahel region, in accordance with applicable international law, recalling its resolution 2133 (2014) and including its call upon all Member States to prevent terrorists from benefitting directly or indirectly from the payment of ransoms or from political concessions and to secure the safe release of hostages and, in this regard, noting the publication of the Global Counterterrorism Forum’s (GCTF) “Algiers Memorandum on Good Practices on Preventing and Denying the Benefits of Kidnapping for Ransom by Terrorists”,

    “Strongly condemning all abuses and violations of human rights and violations of international humanitarian law, including those involving extrajudicial and summary executions, arbitrary arrests and detentions and ill-treatment of prisoners, sexual and gender-based violence, as well as killing, maiming, recruitment and use of children, attacks against schools and hospitals, calling on all parties to respect the civilian character of schools as such in accordance with international humanitarian law and to cease unlawful and arbitrary detention of all children, and calling upon all parties to bring an end to such violations and abuses and to comply with their obligations under applicable international law,

    “Reiterating, in this regard, that all perpetrators of such acts must be held accountable and that some of such acts referred to in the paragraph above may amount to crimes under the Rome Statute and taking note that, acting upon the referral of the transitional authorities of Mali dated 13 July 2012, the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court opened, on 16 January 2013, an investigation into alleged crimes committed on the territory of Mali since January 2012, and recalling the importance of assistance and cooperation, by all parties concerned, with the Court,

    “Emphasizing the need for all parties to uphold and respect the humanitarian principles of humanity, neutrality, impartiality and independence in order to ensure the continued provision of humanitarian assistance, the safety and protection of civilians receiving assistance and the security of humanitarian personnel operating in Mali, and stressing the importance of humanitarian assistance being delivered on the basis of need,

    “Underscoring that Malian civilian control and oversight as well as further consolidation of the Malian Defence and Security Forces are important to ensure Mali’s long-term security and stability and to protect the people of Mali,

    “Commending the role of the European Union Training Mission (EUTM Mali) in Mali in providing training and advice for the Malian Defence and Security Forces, including contributing to the strengthening of civilian authority and respect for human rights, and of the European Union Capacity Building Mission (EUCAP Sahel Mali) in providing strategic advice and training for the Police, Gendarmerie and Garde nationale in Mali,

    “Calling upon the Malian authorities to address immediate and long-term needs, encompassing security, governance reform, development and humanitarian issues, to resolve the crisis in Mali and to ensure that the Agreement translates into concrete benefits for the local populations, notably through the priority projects outlined in the Agreement, calling on the international community to provide broad support in this regard, and stressing the need for enhanced coordination of these international efforts,

    “Commending the contributions already made following donors’ conference held in Brussels in May 2013 and toward the 2015 Consolidated Appeal for Mali, and urging all Member States and other donors to contribute generously to humanitarian operations,

    “Remaining seriously concerned over the significant ongoing food and humanitarian crisis in Mali, and over the insecurity which hinders humanitarian access, exacerbated by the presence of armed groups, terrorist and criminal networks, and their activities, the presence of landmines as well as the continued proliferation of weapons from within and outside the region that threatens the peace, security, and stability of States in this region, and condemning attacks against humanitarian personnel,

    “Determining that the situation in Mali continues to constitute a threat to international peace and security,

    “Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

    “Framework for peace and reconciliation and the implementation of the Agreement on Peace and Reconciliation in Mali

    “1. Urges the Government of Mali, the Plateforme and Coordination armed groups to fulfil their commitments under the Agreement on Peace and Reconciliation in Mali, and in this regard, further urges them to continue to engage constructively with sustained political will and in good faith to achieve the full and effective implementation of the Agreement;

    “2. Urges the Government of Mali, the Plateforme and Coordination armed groups to immediately and fully respect and uphold the ceasefire agreement of 23 May 2014, the Arrangement sécuritaire pour une cessation des hostilités of 5 June 2015, and the declarations of cessation of hostilities of 19 February 2015 and 24 July 2014;

    “3. Expresses its readiness to consider targeted sanctions against those who take actions to obstruct or threaten the implementation of the Agreement, those who resume hostilities and violate the ceasefire, as well as those who attack and take actions to threaten MINUSMA;

    “4. Demands that all armed groups in Mali put aside their arms, cease hostilities, reject the recourse to violence, cut off all ties with terrorist organisations and recognize, without conditions, the unity and territorial integrity of the Malian State;

    “5. Urges the Malian authorities to further combat impunity and, in this regard, to ensure that all perpetrators of violations and abuses of human rights and violations of international humanitarian law, including those involving sexual violence, are held accountable, and also urges the Malian authorities to continue to cooperate with the International Criminal Court, in accordance with Mali’s obligations under the Rome Statute;

    “6. Urges all parties in Mali to cooperate fully with the deployment and activities of MINUSMA, in particular by ensuring the safety, security and freedom of movement of MINUSMA’s personnel with unhindered and immediate access throughout the territory of Mali to enable MINUSMA to carry out fully its mandate;

    “7. Requests the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Mali to continue to use his good offices, particularly to play a key role to support and oversee the implementation of the Agreement by the Government of Mali, the Plateforme and Coordination armed groups, notably by heading the Secretariat of the Comité de suivi de l’Accord (CSA), and in particular, to assist the Malian parties in identifying and prioritizing implementation steps, consistent with the provisions of the Agreement and with paragraph 14 (b) and (c) below, and affirms its intention to facilitate, support and follow closely the implementation of the Agreement;

    “8. Urges the Government of Mali, the Plateforme and Coordination armed groups to cooperate fully and coordinate with the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Mali and MINUSMA, in particular on the implementation of the Agreement;

    “9. Calls on the members of the CSA and other relevant international partners to support the implementation of the Agreement, and to coordinate their efforts with the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Mali and MINUSMA in this regard, and recognizes the role of the CSA to reconcile disagreements between the Malian parties;

    “10. Encourages the Government of Mali to take the necessary steps for the effective implementation of the Agreement, including political and institutional reforms;

    “11. Calls on all relevant United Nations agencies, as well as regional, bilateral and multilateral partners to provide the necessary technical and financial support to contribute to the implementation of the Agreement, in particular its provisions pertaining to socioeconomic and cultural development;

    “MINUSMA’s mandate

    “12. Decides to extend the mandate of MINUSMA until 30 June 2016 within the authorized troop ceiling of 11,240 military personnel, including at least 40 military observers to monitor and supervise the ceasefire, as well as reserve battalions capable of deploying rapidly within the country, and 1,440 police personnel;

    “13. Authorizes MINUSMA to take all necessary means to carry out its mandate, within its capabilities and its areas of deployment;

    “14. Decides that MINUSMA shall perform the following tasks:

    (a) Ceasefire

    “To support, monitor and supervise the implementation of the ceasefire arrangements and confidence-building measures by the Government of Mali, the Plateforme and Coordination armed groups, to devise and support, as needed, local mechanisms with a view to consolidate these arrangements and measures, as well as to report to the Security Council on any violations of the ceasefire, consistent with the provisions of the Agreement, especially its Part III and Annex 2;

    (b) Support to the implementation of the Agreement on Peace and Reconciliation in Mali

    (i) To support the implementation of the political and institutional reforms provided for by the Agreement, especially in its Part II;

    (ii) To support the implementation of the defence and security measures of the Agreement, notably to support, monitor and supervise the ceasefire, to support the cantonment, disarmament, demobilization and reintegration of armed groups, as well as the progressive redeployment of the Malian Defence and Security Forces especially in the North of Mali, taking into account the security conditions, and to coordinate international efforts, in close collaboration with other bilateral partners, donors and international organisations, including the European Union, engaged in these fields, to rebuild the Malian security sector, within the framework set out by the Agreement, especially its Part III and Annex 2;

    (iii) To support the implementation of the reconciliation and justice measures of the Agreement, especially in its Part V, notably the establishment of an international commission of inquiry, in consultation with the parties;

    (iv) To support, within its resources and areas of deployment, the conduct of inclusive, free, fair and transparent local elections, including through the provision of appropriate logistical and technical assistance and effective security arrangements, consistent with the provisions of the Agreement;

    (c) Good offices and reconciliation

    “To exercise good offices, confidence-building and facilitation at the national and local levels, in order to support dialogue with and among all stakeholders towards reconciliation and social cohesion and to encourage and support the full implementation of the Agreement by the Government of Mali, the Plateforme and Coordination armed groups, including by promoting the participation of civil society, including women’s organizations, as well as youth organizations;

    (d) Protection of civilians and stabilization

    (i) To protect, without prejudice to the primary responsibility of the Malian authorities, civilians under imminent threat of physical violence;

    (ii) In support of the Malian authorities, to stabilize the key population centres and other areas where civilians are at risk, notably in the North of Mali, including through long-range patrols, and, in this context, to deter threats and take active steps to prevent the return of armed elements to those areas;

    (iii) To provide specific protection for women and children affected by armed conflict, including through Child Protection Advisors and Women Protection Advisors, and address the needs of victims of sexual and gender-based violence in armed conflict;

    (iv) To assist the Malian authorities with the removal and destruction of mines and other explosive devices and weapons and ammunition management;

    (e) Promotion and protection of human rights

    (i) To assist the Malian authorities in their efforts to promote and protect human rights, including to support, as feasible and appropriate, the efforts of the Malian authorities, without prejudice to their responsibilities, to bring to justice those responsible for serious abuses or violations of human rights or violations of international humanitarian law, in particular war crimes and crimes against humanity in Mali, taking into account the referral by the transitional authorities of Mali of the situation in their country since January 2012 to the International Criminal Court;

    (ii) To monitor, help investigate and report to the Security Council and publicly, as appropriate, on violations of international humanitarian law and on violations and abuses of human rights, including violations and abuses against children and sexual violence in armed conflict committed throughout Mali and to contribute to efforts to prevent such violations and abuses;

    (f) Humanitarian assistance and projects for stabilization

    (i) In support of the Malian authorities, to contribute to the creation of a secure environment for the safe, civilian-led delivery of humanitarian assistance, in accordance with humanitarian principles, and the voluntary, safe and dignified return or local integration or resettlement of internally displaced persons and refugees in close coordination with humanitarian actors;

    (ii) In support of the Malian authorities, to contribute to the creation of a secure environment for projects aimed at stabilizing the North of Mali, including quick impact projects;

    (g) Protection, safety and security of United Nations personnel

    “To protect the United Nations personnel, notably uniformed personnel, installations and equipment and ensure the safety, security and freedom of movement of United Nations and associated personnel;

    (h) Support for cultural preservation

    “To assist the Malian authorities, as necessary and feasible, in protecting from attack the cultural and historical sites in Mali, in collaboration with UNESCO;

    “Deployment and capacities of MINUSMA

    “15. Requests the Secretary-General to take all necessary steps, including through the full use of existing authorities and at his discretion, to enable MINUSMA to reach its full operational capacity without further delay;

    “16. Requests the Secretary-General to take all appropriate additional measures to enhance the safety and security of, and basic services for, MINUSMA’s personnel, in particular uniformed personnel, including through enhancing MINUSMA’s intelligence capacities, providing training and equipment to counter explosive devices, the generation of adequate military capabilities to secure MINUSMA’s logistical supply routes, as well as more effective casualty and medical evacuation procedures, to enable MINUSMA to execute effectively its mandate in a complex security environment that includes asymmetric threats;

    “17. Urges MINUSMA’s troop and police contributing countries to expedite the procurement and deployment of remaining contingent-owned equipment and urges Member States to provide troops and police that have adequate capabilities, training and equipment, including enablers, specific to the operating environment, in order for MINUSMA to fulfil its mandate and welcomes the assistance of Member States to MINUSMA’s troop and police contributing countries in this regard;

    “18. Calls upon Member States, especially those in the region, to ensure the free, unhindered and expeditious movement to and from Mali of all personnel, as well as equipment, provisions, supplies and other goods, which are for the exclusive and official use of MINUSMA, in order to facilitate the timely and cost-effective delivery of the logistical supply of MINUSMA;

    “19. Encourages the Secretary-General to keep the Mission concept under review, in order to maximize the positive impact of MINUSMA’s resources, and requests the Secretary-General to keep it informed on its implementation;

    “Cross-cutting issues of MINUSMA’s mandate

    “20. Requests MINUSMA to further enhance its interaction with the civilian population, as well as its communication with the Malian Defence and Security Forces, including through the development of an effective communication strategy and MINUSMA radio, to raise awareness and understanding about its mandate and activities;

    “21. Requests MINUSMA to ensure that any support provided to non-United Nations security forces is provided in strict compliance with the Human Rights Due Diligence Policy on United Nations support to non-United Nations security forces (HRDDP);

    “22. Requests the Secretary-General to ensure full compliance of MINUSMA with the United Nations zero-tolerance policy on sexual exploitation and abuses and to keep the Council fully informed if such cases of misconduct occur;

    “23. Requests MINUSMA to take fully into account gender considerations as a cross-cutting issue throughout its mandate and to assist the Malian authorities in ensuring the full and effective participation, involvement and representation of women at all levels and at an early stage of the stabilization phase, including the security sector reform and disarmament, demobilization and reintegration processes, as well as in reconciliation and electoral processes and further requests MINUSMA to assist the parties to ensure women’s full and active participation in the implementation of the Agreement;

    “24. Requests MINUSMA to take fully into account child protection as a cross-cutting issue throughout its mandate and to assist the Malian authorities in ensuring that the protection of children’s rights is taken into account, inter alia, in disarmament, demobilization and reintegration processes and in security sector reform in order to end and prevent violations and abuses against children;

    “25. Requests MINUSMA to consider the environmental impacts of its operations when fulfilling its mandated tasks and, in this context, to manage them as appropriate and in accordance with applicable and relevant General Assembly resolutions and United Nations rules and regulations, and to operate mindfully in the vicinity of cultural and historical sites;

    “Inter-mission cooperation in West Africa

    “26. Authorizes the Secretary-General to take the necessary steps in order to ensure inter-mission cooperation, notably between MINUSMA, UNMIL and UNOCI, appropriate transfers of troops and their assets from other United Nations missions to MINUSMA, subject to the following conditions: (i) the Council’s information and approval, including on the scope and duration of the transfer, (ii) the agreement of the troop-contributing countries and (iii) the security situation where these United Nations missions are deployed and without prejudice to the performance of their mandates, and, in this regard, encourages further steps to enhance inter-mission cooperation in the West African region, as necessary and feasible, and to report thereon for consideration as appropriate;

    “French forces mandate

    “27. Authorizes French forces, within the limits of their capacities and areas of deployment, to use all necessary means until the end of MINUSMA’s mandate as authorized in this resolution, to intervene in support of elements of MINUSMA when under imminent and serious threat upon request of the Secretary-General, and requests France to report to the Council on the implementation of this mandate in Mali and to coordinate its reporting with the reporting by the Secretary-General referred to in paragraph 35 below;

    “G5 Sahel and African Union contribution

    “28. Encourages the Member States of the Sahel region to improve coordination to combat recurrent threats in the Sahel, including terrorism, together with transnational organized crime and other illicit activities such as drug trafficking, welcomes the efforts of the Member States of the Sahel to strengthen border security and regional cooperation, including through the G5 Sahel and the Nouakchott process on the enhancement of the security cooperation and the operationalization of the African Peace and Security Architecture in the Sahel and Sahara region (APSA), as well as the commitment made by the African leaders at the Malabo Summit of 26-27 June 2014 and steps taken by the African Union to operationalize the African Capacity for Immediate Response to Crisis (ACIRC), and encourages the Member States of the African Union to generate substantive pledges to the ACIRC;

    “International cooperation on the Sahel

    “29. Calls upon all Member States, notably Sahel, West Africa and Maghreb States, as well as regional, bilateral and multilateral partners, to enhance their coordination to develop inclusive and effective strategies to combat in a comprehensive and integrated manner the activities of terrorist groups crossing borders and seeking safe havens in the Sahel region, notably AQIM, MUJAO, Ansar Eddine and Al Mourabitoune, and to prevent the expansion of those groups as well as to limit the proliferation of all arms and transnational organized crime;

    “30. Reiterates its call for the rapid and effective implementation, in consultation with regional organisations, of regional strategies encompassing security, governance, development, human rights and humanitarian issues such as the United Nations integrated strategy for the Sahel region, and recalls in this regard the good offices role of its Special Envoy for the Sahel in order to enhance regional and interregional cooperation, in close coordination with the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for West Africa;

    “European Union contribution

    “31. Calls on the European Union, notably its Special Representative for the Sahel and its EUTM Mali and EUCAP Sahel Mali missions, to coordinate closely with MINUSMA, and other bilateral partners of Mali engaged to assist the Malian authorities in the Security Sector Reform (SSR), as provided for by the Agreement and consistent with paragraph 14 (b) (ii) above;

    “Obligations under international humanitarian and human rights law

    “32. Urges all parties to comply with obligations under international humanitarian law to respect and protect humanitarian personnel, facilities and relief consignments, and take all required steps to allow and facilitate the full, safe, immediate and unimpeded access of humanitarian actors for the delivery of humanitarian assistance to all people in need, while respecting the United Nations humanitarian guiding principles and applicable international law;

    “33. Reiterates that the Malian authorities have primary responsibility to protect civilians in Mali, further recalls its resolutions 1265 (1999), 1296 (2000), 1674 (2006), 1738 (2006) and 1894 (2009) on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, its resolutions 1612 (2005), 1882 (2009), 1998 (2011), 2068 (2012), 2143 (2014) and 2225 (2015) on Children And Armed Conflict and its resolutions 1325 (2000), 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009), 1960 (2010), 2106 (2013) and 2122 (2013) on Women, Peace and Security and calls upon MINUSMA and all military forces in Mali to take them into account and to abide by international humanitarian, human rights and refugee law, and recalls the importance of training in this regard, and urges all parties to implement the conclusions on Children And Armed Conflict in Mali adopted by the Security Council working group on 7 July 2014;

    “Small arms and light weapons

    “34. Calls upon the Malian authorities, with the assistance of MINUSMA, consistent with paragraph 14 above, and international partners, to address the issue of the proliferation and illicit trafficking of small arms and light weapons in accordance with the ECOWAS Convention on Small Arms and Light Weapons, Their Ammunition and Other Related Materials and the United Nations Programme of Action on Small Arms and Light Weapons, in order to ensure the safe and effective management, storage and security of their stockpiles of small arms and light weapons and the collection and/or destruction of surplus, seized, unmarked or illicitly held weapons, and further stresses the importance of the full implementation of its resolutions 2017 (2011), 2117 (2013) and 2220 (2015);

    “Reports by the Secretary-General and review of the mandate

    “35. Requests the Secretary-General to report to the Security Council every three months after the adoption of this resolution on the implementation of this resolution, focusing on the progress in the implementation of the Agreement on Peace and Reconciliation in Mali and on MINUSMA’s efforts to support it;

    “36. Affirms its intention to consider reviewing the mandate of MINUSMA before 30 June 2016, as necessary, especially in light of progress made on the implementation of the Agreement;

    “37. Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.”

    For information media. Not an official record.


    0 0

    Source: UN Security Council
    Country: Mali

    CS/11950

    7474e séance – matin
    CONSEIL DE SÉCURITÉ
    COUVERTURE DES RÉUNIONS

    Le Conseil de sécurité a adopté ce matin à l’unanimité la résolution 2227 (2015) qui proroge le mandat de la Mission multidimensionnelle intégrée des Nations Unies pour la stabilisation au Mali (MINUSMA) jusqu’au 30 juin 2016.

    Le représentant du Mali, M. Sékou Kasse, s’est réjoui de l’adoption d’une résolution « de haute portée politique et historique qui prend en compte l’essentiel des préoccupations du Gouvernement ». Dans son préambule, la résolution accueille avec satisfaction la signature par la plateforme et la Coordination des groupes armés de l’Accord pour la paix et la réconciliation au Mali, qui « représente une occasion historique d’installer durablement la paix ».

    « Nous sommes heureux de constater que le Conseil de sécurité, dans sa grande sagesse, nous a entendus en articulant le nouveau mandat de la MINUSMA autour de la mise en œuvre effective et intégrale de l’Accord de paix », a commenté le représentant du Mali.

    Insistant sur le fait que l’Accord pour la paix et la réconciliation est le « fruit de 11 mois d’intenses négociations intermaliennes », le représentant du Mali a prévenu qu’il serait fort dommageable que tant d’efforts consentis soient annihilés par des ennemis de la paix qui multiplient les actes terroristes partout dans le pays ». Dans sa résolution, le Conseil de déclare disposé à envisager des sanctions ciblées contre ceux qui s’emploient à empêcher ou compromettre la mise en œuvre de l’Accord, ceux qui reprennent les hostilités et violent le cessez-le-feu ainsi que contre ceux qui lancent des attaques contre la MINUSMA ou menacent de le faire.

    La MINUSMA a pour mandat de surveiller le cessez-le-feu, d’appuyer l’application de l’Accord, d’user de ses bons offices pour le dialogue sur la réconciliation, de protéger les civils, de promouvoir les droits de l’homme, de créer les conditions de sécurité pour l’aide humanitaire, de protéger le personnel de l’ONU et de soutenir la sauvegarde du patrimoine culturel.

    Le représentant du Mali a réitéré l’appel du Gouvernement à toutes les parties signataires de l’Accord pour qu’elles mutualisent leurs efforts et leurs intelligences pour bouter hors du territoire national un ennemi commun à savoir les groupes terroristes et narco-djihadistes « qui ne cherchent qu’à assouvir leurs appétits criminels aux moyens de la peur et de la terreur ».

    Dans la résolution, le Conseil autorise l’armée française à user de tous moyens nécessaires pour intervenir à l’appui d’éléments de la MINUSMA en cas de danger grave et imminent.

    LA SITUATION AU MALI

    Rapport du Secrétaire général sur la situation au Mali (S/2015/426)

    Lettre datée du 16 juin 2015, adressée au Président du Conseil de sécurité par le Secrétaire général (S/2015/444)

    Texte du projet de résolution (S/2015/481)

    Le Conseil de sécurité,

    Rappelant ses résolutions antérieures, en particulier les résolutions 2164 (2014) et 2100 (2013), les déclarations de son président en date des 6 février 2015 (S/PRST/2015/5), 28 juillet 2014 (S/PRST/2014/15) et 23 janvier 2014 (S/PRST/2014/2), et ses déclarations à la presse en date des 18 juin, 29 mai, 1er mai et 10 avril 2015,

    Réaffirmant son ferme attachement à la souveraineté, à l’unité et à l’intégrité territoriale du Mali, insistant sur le fait que c’est avant tout aux autorités maliennes qu’il incombe d’assurer la stabilité et la sécurité sur l’ensemble du territoire malien, et soulignant qu’il importe que le pays prenne en main les initiatives en faveur de la paix et de la sécurité,

    Réaffirmant les principes fondamentaux du maintien de la paix, y compris le consentement des parties, l’impartialité et le non-recours à la force, sauf le cas de légitime défense ou pour la défense de mandat, et conscient que le mandat de chaque mission de maintien de la paix est fonction des besoins et de la situation du pays concerné,

    Conscient de l’aspiration légitime de tous les citoyens maliens à voir la paix et le développement s’installer durablement,

    Accueillant avec satisfaction la signature, en 2015, par le Gouvernement malien et les coalitions de groupes armés Plateforme et Coordination des mouvements de l’Azawad, de l’Accord pour la paix et la réconciliation au Mali, qui représente une occasion historique d’installer durablement la paix au Mali, et félicitant les signataires de l’Accord pour le courage dont ils ont fait preuve à cet égard,

    Voyant dans l’Accord un texte équilibré et complet, en ce qu’il prend en compte les dimensions politique et institutionnelle de la crise au Mali et les aspects touchant la gouvernance, la sécurité, le développement et la réconciliation, tout en respectant la souveraineté, l’unité et l’intégrité territoriale de l’État malien,

    Soulignant que la mise en œuvre pleine et effective de l’Accord, qui doit être prise en charge et pilotée par les Maliens eux-mêmes, incombe au Gouvernement malien et aux groupes armés des coalitions Plateforme et Coordination, et sera indispensable à l’instauration d’une paix durable au Mali, compte étant tenu des enseignements tirés des accords de paix précédents,

    Saluant le rôle joué par l’Algérie et les autres membres de l’équipe de médiation internationale s’agissant de faciliter le dialogue intermalien, lequel a abouti à la signature de l’Accord par le Gouvernement malien et les groupes armés des coalitions Plateforme et Coordination, se félicitant de la signature de l’Accord par les membres de l’équipe de médiation internationale et demandant aux membres du Comité de suivi de l’Accord et aux autres partenaires internationaux d’appuyer la mise en œuvre de l’Accord et de continuer de coordonner étroitement leur action afin de concourir à l’instauration d’une paix durable au Mali,

    Souligne la nécessité d’appuyer la mise en œuvre de l’Accord par des mécanismes de contrôle bien définis, détaillés et concrets, notamment par l’intermédiaire du Comité de suivi de l’Accord et de ses quatre sous-comités, qui s’occupent des questions politiques et institutionnelles, de la défense et de la sécurité, du développement économique, social et culturel, et des questions liées à la réconciliation, à la justice et à l’action humanitaire,

    Condamnant fermement les violations du cessez-le-feu commises dans le pays par les parties maliennes, qui ont causé des pertes en vies humaines, notamment parmi les civils, et des déplacements de population, et compromis le processus de paix, se félicitant que le Gouvernement malien et les groupes armés de la coalition Coordination aient signé, le 5 juin 2015, l’Arrangement sécuritaire pour une cessation des hostilités, et rappelant l’accord de cessez-le-feu du 23 mai 2014 et les déclarations sur la cessation des hostilités en date des 19 février 2015 et 24 juillet 2014, qu’ont signées les parties maliennes,

    Réaffirmant son ferme appui au Représentant spécial du Secrétaire général pour le Mali et à la Mission multidimensionnelle intégrée des Nations Unies pour la stabilisation au Mali (MINUSMA), qui concourent aux efforts déployés par les autorités et le peuple maliens pour installer durablement la paix et la stabilité dans leur pays, et prenant note de l’élaboration de la stratégie de protection des civils de la MINUSMA, tout en sachant qu’il incombe au premier chef aux autorités maliennes de protéger la population,

    Saluant la contribution des pays qui fournissent des contingents et des effectifs de police à la MINUSMA, rendant hommage aux soldats de la paix qui risquent ainsi leur vie, condamnant avec force les attaques visant le personnel de maintien de la paix et soulignant que celles-ci peuvent constituer des crimes de guerre au regard du droit international,

    Se déclarant préoccupé par la lenteur du déploiement du personnel et du matériel de la MINUSMA, qui empêche largement la Mission de s’acquitter pleinement de son mandat depuis qu’elle a été créée, le 25 avril 2013, par la résolution 2100 (2013), et se félicitant des efforts déployés par le Secrétaire général pour accélérer le déploiement des contingents et du matériel et pour dispenser une formation adéquate, de façon à améliorer la sûreté et la sécurité du personnel de la MINUSMA dans des conditions de sécurité complexes marquées notamment par des menaces asymétriques, en particulier l’emploi de mines et de dispositifs explosifs improvisés,

    Condamnant vigoureusement les activités menées au Mali et dans la région du Sahel par des organisations terroristes, telles qu’Al-Qaida au Maghreb islamique (AQMI), Ansar Eddine et le Mouvement pour l’unicité et le jihad en Afrique de l’Ouest (MUJAO), qui continuent de sévir au Mali et constituent une menace pour la paix et la sécurité dans la région et ailleurs, ainsi que les atteintes aux droits de l’homme et les actes de violence commis sur la personne de civils, notamment des femmes et des enfants, dans le nord du Mali et dans la région, par des groupes terroristes,

    Soulignant que le terrorisme ne peut être vaincu qu’à la faveur d’une démarche suivie et globale, fondée sur la participation et la collaboration actives de l’ensemble des États et organismes régionaux et internationaux, visant à contrer, affaiblir et isoler la menace terroriste, et réaffirmant que le terrorisme ne peut et ne saurait être associé à aucune religion, nationalité ou civilisation,

    Rappelant que le MUJAO, Al-Qaida au Maghreb islamique, Ansar Eddine et son dirigeant, Iyad Ad Ghali, et Al Mourabitoune sont inscrits sur la Liste relative aux sanctions contre Al-Qaida établie par le Comité du Conseil de sécurité faisant suite aux résolutions 1267 (1999) et 1989 (2011), et se déclarant à nouveau disposé à sanctionner, au titre du régime susmentionné et conformément aux critères arrêtés pour l’inscription sur la Liste, d’autres personnes, groupes, entreprises et entités qui sont associés à Al-Qaida ou à d’autres entités ou personnes inscrites sur la Liste, notamment AQMI, le MUJAO, Ansar Eddine et Al Mourabitoune,

    Saluant l’action que les forces françaises continuent de mener, à la demande des autorités maliennes, pour écarter la menace terroriste dans le nord du Mali,

    Prenant note avec une inquiétude croissante de la dimension transnationale de la menace terroriste dans la région du Sahel, soulignant l’importance de la maîtrise régionale de l’action menée à cet égard, accueillant avec satisfaction, dans ce contexte, la création du Groupe de cinq pays du Sahel (G5 Sahel) et le lancement du Processus de Nouakchott relatif au renforcement de la coopération en matière de sécurité et à l’opérationnalisation de l’Architecture africaine de paix et de sécurité dans la région sahélo-saharienne ainsi que l’engagement souscrit par les dirigeants africains lors du Sommet de Malabo les 26 et 27 juin 2014 et les mesures prises, par l’Union africaine pour rendre opérationnelle la capacité africaine de réponse immédiate aux crises (CARIC), et se félicitant de l’action menée par les forces françaises pour aider les États Membres faisant partie du G5 Sahel à renforcer la coopération régionale en matière de lutte contre le terrorisme,

    Se déclarant toujours préoccupé par les graves menaces que représentent la criminalité transnationale organisée dans la région du Sahel, notamment le trafic d’armes et de stupéfiants, la traite d’êtres humains, et les liens qui se développent, dans certains cas, entre cette criminalité et le terrorisme, soulignant que la responsabilité de lutter contre ces menaces incombe aux pays de la région, et se félicitant de l’effet stabilisateur de la présence internationale au Mali, notamment la MINUSMA,

    Condamnant fermement les enlèvements et prises d’otages ayant pour but d’obtenir des fonds ou des concessions politiques, réaffirmant qu’il est résolu à empêcher les enlèvements et prises d’otages dans la région du Sahel, dans le respect du droit international applicable, rappelant sa résolution 2133 (2014), dans laquelle il a notamment demandé à tous les États Membres d’empêcher les terroristes de profiter directement ou indirectement de rançons ou de concessions politiques et de faire en sorte que les otages soient libérés sains et saufs, et, à ce propos, prenant note du Mémorandum d’Alger sur les bonnes pratiques en matière de prévention des enlèvements contre rançon par des terroristes et d’élimination des avantages qui en découlent, publié par le Forum mondial de lutte contre le terrorisme,

    Condamnant fermement toutes les violations des droits de l’homme et atteintes à ces droits et toutes les violations du droit international humanitaire, y compris les exécutions extrajudiciaires et sommaires, les arrestations et détentions arbitraires, les mauvais traitements infligés aux prisonniers et la violence sexuelle ou sexiste, ainsi que le meurtre, la mutilation, le recrutement et l’utilisation d’enfants, et les attaques contre des écoles et des hôpitaux, et demandant à toutes les parties de respecter le caractère civil des écoles conformément au droit international humanitaire, de cesser de détenir illégalement et arbitrairement des enfants, de mettre fin à ces violations et atteintes et de s’acquitter des obligations que leur impose le droit international applicable,

    Rappelant, à ce sujet, que tous les auteurs de tels actes doivent être amenés à en répondre et que certains des actes mentionnés au paragraphe précédent peuvent constituer des crimes au regard du Statut de Rome, notant que, les autorités de transition maliennes ayant saisi la Cour pénale internationale, le 13 juillet 2012, le Procureur a, le 16 janvier 2013, ouvert une enquête sur les crimes commis sur le territoire du Mali depuis janvier 2012, et rappelant qu’il importe que toutes les parties concernées prêtent leur concours à la Cour et lui apportent leur coopération,

    Soulignant la nécessité pour toutes les parties de défendre et de respecter les principes humanitaires d’humanité, de neutralité, d’impartialité et d’indépendance afin que l’aide humanitaire puisse continuer d’être fournie et en vue d’assurer la sécurité et la protection des civils qui la reçoivent et celle du personnel humanitaire travaillant au Mali, et insistant sur le fait qu’il importe que l’aide humanitaire soit fournie en fonction des besoins,

    Soulignant combien il importe que les Forces de défense et de sécurité maliennes soient placées sous la tutelle et le contrôle d’une autorité civile et soient encore renforcées si l’on veut garantir la sécurité et la stabilité à long terme et protéger le peuple malien,

    Saluant le rôle de la mission de formation de l’Union européenne au Mali (EUTM Mali), qui dispense une formation et des conseils aux Forces de défense et de sécurité maliennes en vue notamment d’aider à asseoir l’autorité civile et le respect des droits de l’homme, et de la mission de renforcement des capacités de l’Union européenne (EUCAP Sahel Mali), chargée de prodiguer conseils stratégiques et formation à la police, la gendarmerie et la garde nationale maliennes,

    Demandant aux autorités maliennes de répondre aux besoins immédiats et à long terme dans les domaines de la sécurité, la réforme de la gouvernance, du développement et de l’action humanitaire, en vue de régler la crise au Mali et de veiller à ce que l’Accord procure des avantages concrets aux populations locales, notamment grâce à l’exécution des projets prioritaires qui y sont prévus, demandant à la communauté internationale d’apporter un vaste soutien à cet égard et soulignant la nécessité de renforcer la coordination de ces efforts internationaux,

    Se félicitant des contributions déjà versées dans le prolongement de la conférence des donateurs qui s’est tenue à Bruxelles en mai 2013 et au titre de l’appel global pour le Mali pour 2015, et exhortant les États Membres et autres donateurs à contribuer généreusement au financement des opérations humanitaires,

    Demeurant gravement préoccupé par l’ampleur de la crise alimentaire et humanitaire au Mali, et par l’insécurité qui entrave l’accès humanitaire, que viennent aggraver la présence et les activités de groupes armés et de réseaux terroristes et criminels, la présence de mines terrestres, et la poursuite de la prolifération d’armes en provenance de la région et d’ailleurs, qui menace la paix, la sécurité et la stabilité des États de la région, et condamnant les attaques dirigées contre le personnel humanitaire,

    Considérant que la situation au Mali continue de menacer la paix et la sécurité internationales,

    Agissant en vertu du Chapitre VII de la Charte des Nations Unies,

    Cadre pour la paix et la réconciliation et mise en œuvre de l’Accord pour la paix et la réconciliation au Mali

    "1. Prie instamment le Gouvernement malien et les groupes armés des coalitions Plateforme et Coordination de s’acquitter des engagements pris au titre de l’Accord pour la paix et la réconciliation au Mali et les exhorte à cet égard à poursuivre leurs échanges de manière constructive, avec une ferme volonté politique et en toute bonne foi, afin d’assurer l’application intégrale et effective de l’Accord;

    "2. Prie instamment le Gouvernement malien et les groupes armés des coalitions Plateforme et Coordination de respecter et de faire appliquer immédiatement et intégralement l’accord de cessez-le-feu du 23 mai 2014, l’Arrangement sécuritaire pour une cessation des hostilités du 5 juin 2015 et les déclarations sur la cessation des hostilités en date des 19 février 2015 et 24 juillet 2014;

    "3. Se déclare disposé à envisager des sanctions ciblées contre ceux qui s’emploient à empêcher ou compromettre la mise en œuvre de l’Accord, ceux qui reprennent les hostilités et violent le cessez-le-feu, ainsi que contre ceux qui lancent des attaques contre la MINUSMA ou menacent de le faire;

    "4. Exige de tous les groupes armés présents au Mali qu’ils déposent les armes, mettent fin aux hostilités, renoncent à la violence, rompent tous liens avec des organisations terroristes et reconnaissent sans condition l’unité et l’intégrité territoriale de l’État malien;

    "5. Exhorte les autorités maliennes à intensifier leur lutte contre l’impunité et, à cet égard, à amener tous les auteurs de violations des droits de l’homme et atteintes à ces droits et de violations du droit international humanitaire, y compris de violences sexuelles, à répondre de leurs actes, et les exhorte aussi à continuer de coopérer avec la Cour pénale internationale, en exécution des obligations souscrites par le Mali au titre du Statut de Rome;

    "6. Exhorte toutes les parties maliennes à coopérer pleinement au déploiement et aux activités de la MINUSMA, tout particulièrement en assurant la sûreté, la sécurité et la liberté de circulation de son personnel et en lui assurant un accès immédiat et sans entrave à l’ensemble du territoire malien, afin que la Mission puisse s’acquitter pleinement de son mandat;

    "7. Prie le Représentant spécial du Secrétaire général pour le Mali de continuer d’user de ses bons offices, en particulier de jouer un rôle de premier plan pour ce qui est d’appuyer et de superviser la mise en œuvre de l’accord par le Gouvernement malien et les groupes armés des coalitions Plateforme et Coordination, notamment en dirigeant le secrétariat du Comité de suivi de l’Accord, et d’aider tout particulièrement les parties maliennes à définir des mesures de mise en œuvre et à les classer par ordre de priorité, conformément aux dispositions de l’Accord et aux alinéas b) et c) du paragraphe 14 ci-après, et affirme son intention de faciliter, d’appuyer et de suivre de près la mise en œuvre de l’Accord;

    "8. Demande instamment au Gouvernement malien et aux groupes armés des coalitions Plateforme et Coordination de coopérer pleinement et de se concerter avec le Représentant spécial du Secrétaire général pour le Mali et la MINUSMA, en particulier en ce qui concerne la mise en œuvre de l’Accord;

    "9. Prie les membres du Comité de suivi de l’Accord et les autres partenaires internationaux d’appuyer la mise en œuvre de l’Accord et de coordonner, à cet égard, leurs efforts avec ceux du Représentant spécial du Secrétaire général pour le Mali et la MINUSMA, et salue le rôle que joue le Comité pour aplanir les désaccords entre les parties maliennes;

    "10. Engage le Gouvernement malien à prendre les mesures nécessaires pour assurer l’application effective de l’Accord, notamment à engager des réformes politiques et institutionnelles;

    "11. Demande à tous les organismes compétents des Nations Unies, ainsi qu’aux partenaires régionaux, bilatéraux et multilatéraux, de fournir l’appui technique et financier nécessaire à la mise en œuvre de l’Accord, notamment des dispositions relatives au développement socioéconomique et culturel;

    Mandat de la MINUSMA

    "12. Décide de proroger le mandat de la MINUSMA jusqu’au 30 juin 2016, dans les limites de l’effectif maximum autorisé, soit 11 240 militaires, y compris un nombre minimum de 40 observateurs militaires chargés de surveiller et de superviser le cessez-le-feu et l’effectif des bataillons de réserve pouvant être déployés rapidement à l’intérieur du pays, et 1 440 policiers;

    "13. Autorise la MINUSMA à utiliser tous les moyens nécessaires pour accomplir son mandat, dans les limites de ses capacités et dans ses zones de déploiement;

    "14. Décide que la MINUSMA s’acquittera des tâches ci-après:

    a) Cessez-le-feu

    Appuyer, surveiller et superviser l’application des arrangements relatifs au cessez-le-feu et des mesures de confiance par le Gouvernement malien, les groupes armés de la Plateforme et de la Coordination, concevoir et appuyer, selon que de besoin, des mécanismes locaux en vue de consolider ces arrangements et mesures, et lui faire rapport sur les violations éventuelles du cessez-le-feu, conformément aux dispositions de l’Accord, en particulier de son titre III et de son annexe 2;

    b) Appui à l’application de l’Accord pour la paix et la réconciliation au Mali

    Appuyer la mise en œuvre des réformes politiques et institutionnelles prévues par l’Accord, en particulier dans son titre II;

    ii) Appuyer l’application des mesures de défense et de sécurité énoncées dans l’Accord, notamment celles qui ont trait au soutien, à l’observation et à la supervision du cessez-le-feu, appuyer le cantonnement, le désarmement, la démobilisation et la réintégration des groupes armés, ainsi que le redéploiement progressif des Forces de défense et de sécurité maliennes, en particulier dans le nord du Mali, en tenant compte des conditions de sécurité, et coordonner les efforts internationaux déployés, en étroite collaboration avec les autres partenaires bilatéraux, donateurs et organismes internationaux menant des activités dans ces domaines, dont l’Union européenne, en vue de rebâtir le secteur de la sécurité malien dans le cadre défini par l’Accord, en particulier son titre III et son annexe 2;

    iii) Appuyer l’application des mesures de réconciliation et de justice énoncées dans l’Accord, en particulier dans son titre V, notamment la création d’une commission d’enquête internationale, en consultation avec les parties;

    iv) Concourir, dans les limites de ses moyens et dans ses zones de déploiement, à l’organisation d’élections locales transparentes, régulières, libres et ouvertes à tous, en apportant notamment l’aide logistique et technique voulue et en mettant en place des mesures de sécurité efficaces, conformément aux dispositions de l’Accord;

    c) Bons offices et réconciliation

    User de ses bons offices et de mesures de confiance et d’encouragement aux niveaux national et local pour appuyer un dialogue axé sur la réconciliation et la cohésion sociale avec toutes les parties prenantes, et entre elles, et encourager et soutenir la pleine mise en œuvre de l’Accord par le Gouvernement malien et les groupes armés de la Plateforme et de la Coordination, notamment en favorisant la participation de la société civile, y compris des organisations de femmes et de jeunes;

    d) Protection des civils et stabilisation

    i) Assurer, sans préjudice de la responsabilité première des autorités maliennes, la protection des civils immédiatement menacés de violences physiques;

    ii) Pour appuyer les autorités maliennes, stabiliser les principales agglomérations et les autres zones où les civils sont en danger, notamment dans le nord du pays, en effectuant des patrouilles de longue portée, entre autres choses, et, dans ce contexte, écarter les menaces et prendre activement des dispositions pour empêcher le retour d’éléments armés dans ces zones;

    iii) Assurer une protection particulière aux femmes et aux enfants touchés par le conflit armé, notamment en déployant des conseillers pour la protection des enfants et des conseillers pour la protection des femmes, et répondre aux besoins des victimes de violences sexuelles et sexistes liées au conflit;

    iv) Aider les autorités maliennes à procéder au retrait et à la destruction des mines et autres engins explosifs et à gérer les armes et munitions;

    e) Promotion et défense des droits de l’homme

    i) Aider les autorités maliennes dans leur entreprise de promotion et de défense des droits de l’homme, notamment en concourant, dans la mesure du possible et du nécessaire et sans préjudice des responsabilités de celles-ci, à l’action qu’elles mènent en vue de traduire en justice ceux qui ont commis au Mali des violations graves des droits de l’homme ou des atteintes graves à ces droits, ou des violations graves du droit international humanitaire, notamment des crimes de guerre et des crimes contre l’humanité, en tenant compte du fait que les autorités maliennes de transition ont saisi la Cour pénale internationale de la situation qui règne dans leur pays depuis janvier 2012;

    ii) Surveiller, sur le territoire national, les violations du droit international humanitaire et les violations des droits de l’homme et atteintes à ces droits, notamment celles commises sur la personne d’enfants et les violences sexuelles liées au conflit armé, concourir aux enquêtes et faire rapport à ce sujet au Conseil de sécurité et publiquement, et contribuer aux activités de prévention de ces violations et atteintes;

    f) Aide humanitaire et projets en faveur de la stabilisation

    i) Pour appuyer les autorités maliennes, contribuer à créer les conditions de sécurité indispensables à l’acheminement sûr de l’aide humanitaire sous la direction de civils, conformément aux principes humanitaires, et au retour volontaire, en toute sécurité et dans la dignité, ou à l’intégration locale ou à la réinstallation des déplacés et des réfugiés, en coordination étroite avec les acteurs humanitaires;

    ii) Pour appuyer les autorités maliennes, contribuer à créer les conditions de sécurité indispensables à la mise en œuvre de projets visant à stabiliser le nord du Mali, y compris des projets à effet rapide;

    g) Protection, sûreté et sécurité du personnel des Nations Unies

    Protéger le personnel, notamment le personnel en tenue, les installations et le matériel des Nations Unies et assurer la sûreté, la sécurité et la liberté de circulation du personnel des Nations Unies et du personnel associé;

    h) Appui à la sauvegarde du patrimoine culturel

    Aider les autorités maliennes, dans la mesure du possible et du nécessaire, à protéger les sites culturels et historiques du pays contre toutes attaques, en collaboration avec l’UNESCO;

    Déploiement et capacités de la MINUSMA

    "15. Prie le Secrétaire général de prendre toutes les dispositions voulues, en usant pleinement des pouvoirs existants, et à sa discrétion, pour permettre à la MINUSMA d’atteindre sa pleine capacité opérationnelle sans plus tarder;

    "16. Prie également le Secrétaire général de prendre toutes les autres mesures qui s’imposent pour renforcer la sûreté et la sécurité du personnel de la MINUSMA, en particulier des agents en tenue, et les services de base conçus à son intention, notamment en développant les capacités de la Mission en matière de renseignement, en fournissant des dispositifs de protection contre les engins explosifs et en assurant une formation dans ce domaine, en dotant la Mission de moyens militaires appropriés pour sécuriser ses voies d’approvisionnement logistique et en améliorant les procédures d’évacuation des blessés et des malades, de sorte que la MINUSMA puisse s’acquitter avec efficacité de son mandat dans des conditions de sécurité complexes marquées notamment par des menaces asymétriques;

    "17. Exhorte les pays qui fournissent des contingents et du personnel de police à la MINUSMA à accélérer l’achat et le déploiement du reste du matériel appartenant aux contingents, engage vivement les États Membres à mettre à disposition des contingents et du personnel de police ayant les capacités, les compétences et le matériel nécessaires, y compris les éléments habilitants voulus, en les adaptant au contexte opérationnel, pour que la Mission puisse s’acquitter de son mandat, et accueille favorablement l’aide que les États Membres apporteront à cet égard aux pays qui fournissent des contingents et des forces de police à la MINUSMA;

    "18. Demande aux États Membres, en particulier à ceux de la région, de garantir la libre circulation, sans entrave ni retard, à destination et en provenance du Mali, de l’ensemble du personnel, du matériel, des vivres et fournitures et autres biens destinés à l’usage exclusif et officiel de la MINUSMA, afin de faciliter l’acheminement de ses moyens logistiques en temps opportun et dans de bonnes conditions d’économie et d’efficacité;

    "19. Recommande au Secrétaire général de poursuivre l’étude du concept stratégique de la Mission afin de rentabiliser au mieux ses ressources limitées et le prie de le tenir informé de la situation au regard de sa mise en œuvre;

    Questions transversales touchant tous les aspects du mandat de la MINUSMA

    "20. Prie la MINUSMA d’améliorer encore ses rapports avec la population civile et ses échanges avec les Forces de défense et de sécurité maliennes pour faire mieux connaître et comprendre son mandat et ses activités, notamment en élaborant une stratégie de communication efficace et en développant ses activités radiophoniques;

    "21. Prie également la MINUSMA de veiller à ce que tout appui fourni à des forces de sécurité autres que celles de l’ONU soit strictement conforme à la Politique de diligence voulue en matière de droits de l’homme dans le contexte de la fourniture d’appui par l’ONU à des forces de sécurité non onusiennes;

    "22. Prie le Secrétaire général de veiller à ce que la MINUSMA respecte à la lettre la politique de tolérance zéro de l’Organisation à l’égard de l’exploitation et des agressions sexuelles, et de le tenir informé de tous cas de conduite répréhensible au regard de cette politique;

    "23. Prie la MINUSMA de considérer la problématique hommes-femmes comme une question transversale touchant tous les aspects de son mandat, et d’aider les autorités maliennes à garantir la participation pleine et entière et la représentation des femmes à tous les niveaux et à un stade précoce de la phase de stabilisation, y compris dans le cadre de la réforme du secteur de la sécurité et des opérations de désarmement, de démobilisation et de réintégration, ainsi que du processus de réconciliation et des élections, et la prie en outre d’aider les parties à assurer la pleine et active participation des femmes à l’application de l’Accord;

    "24. Prie la MINUSMA de considérer la protection des enfants comme une question transversale touchant tous les aspects de son mandat, et d’aider les autorités maliennes à veiller à ce que la protection des droits des enfants soit prise en compte, notamment dans le cadre des opérations de désarmement, de démobilisation et de réintégration et de la réforme du secteur de la sécurité afin de faire cesser et de prévenir les violations et atteintes commises sur la personne d’enfants;

    "25. Prie également la MINUSMA d’étudier les effets sur l’environnement des activités menées par elle en exécution des tâches qui lui sont confiées, de maîtriser ces effets, selon qu’il convient et conformément aux résolutions de l’Assemblée générale et règles et règlements applicables de l’Organisation, et de conduire ses opérations précautionneusement dans le voisinage de sites culturels et historiques;

    Coopération entre missions en Afrique de l’Ouest

    "26. Autorise le Secrétaire général à prendre les mesures nécessaires pour assurer la coopération entre missions, notamment entre la MINUSMA, la MINUL et l’ONUCI, et le transfert à la MINUSMA de contingents et de biens d’autres missions, sous réserve i) qu’il soit informé de ces transferts et en approuve notamment la composition et la durée, ii) que les pays fournisseurs de contingents donnent leur assentiment, et iii) que les conditions de sécurité dans les zones de déploiement des missions concernées autorisent ces transferts et que l’exécution du mandat de ces missions ne soit pas compromise, l’encourage à cet égard à adopter des mesures supplémentaires pour renforcer la coopération entre les missions en Afrique de l’Ouest, dans la mesure du possible et du nécessaire, et le prie de lui faire rapport à ce sujet selon qu’il conviendra;

    Mandat des forces françaises

    "27. Autorise l’armée française à user de tous moyens nécessaires, dans la limite de ses capacités et dans ses zones de déploiement, jusqu’à la fin du mandat confié à la MINUSMA par la présente résolution, pour intervenir à l’appui d’éléments de la Mission en cas de danger grave et imminent, à la demande du Secrétaire général, et prie la France de lui rendre compte de l’application du présent mandat au Mali et de coordonner la présentation de cette information avec celle que communiquera le Secrétaire général suivant le paragraphe 32 de la présente résolution;

    G5 Sahel et contribution de l’Union africaine

    "28. Encourage les États Membres de la région du Sahel à se coordonner davantage pour lutter contre les menaces récurrentes dans le Sahel, y compris le terrorisme, ainsi que d’autres activités illicites telles que le trafic de drogues, se félicite des efforts déployés par les États Membres du Sahel pour renforcer la sécurité des frontières et la coopération régionale, notamment dans le cadre du G5 Sahel et du Processus de Nouakchott relatif au renforcement de la coopération en matière de sécurité et à l’opérationnalisation de l’Architecture africaine de paix et de sécurité dans la région sahélo-saharienne, ainsi que de l’engagement souscrit par les dirigeants africains lors du Sommet de Malabo les 26 et 27 juin 2014 et des mesures prises par l’Union africaine pour rendre opérationnelle la Capacité africaine de réponse immédiate aux crises (CARIC), et encourage les États Membres de l’Union africaine à mobiliser d’importantes annonces de contributions en faveur de la CARIC;

    Coopération internationale concernant le Sahel

    "29. Demande à tous les États Membres, en particulier aux États du Sahel, de l’Afrique de l’Ouest et du Maghreb, ainsi qu’aux partenaires régionaux, bilatéraux et multilatéraux, de se coordonner davantage aux fins de la mise au point de stratégies sans exclusive et efficaces devant permettre de mener une lutte globale et intégrée contre les activités des groupes terroristes qui traversent les

    frontières et cherchent refuge dans la région du Sahel, notamment AQMI, le MUJAO, Ansar Eddine et Al Mourabitoune, et de prévenir leur expansion, ainsi que de contenir la prolifération de toutes armes et formes de criminalité transnationale organisée;

    "30. Demande de nouveau d’assurer, en consultation avec les organisations régionales, la mise en œuvre rapide et effective des stratégies régionales qui englobent la sécurité, la gouvernance, le développement, les droits de l’homme et les questions humanitaires telles que la Stratégie intégrée des Nations Unies pour le Sahel, et rappelle, à cet égard, le rôle que joue l’Envoyé spécial du Secrétaire général pour le Sahel en offrant ses bons offices pour renforcer la coopération régionale et interrégionale, en étroite coordination avec le Représentant spécial du Secrétaire général pour l’Afrique de l’Ouest;

    Contribution de l’Union européenne

    "31. Invite l’Union européenne, en particulier son Représentant spécial pour le Sahel et ses missions EUTM Mali et EUCAP Sahel Mali, à se coordonner étroitement avec la MINUSMA et les autres partenaires bilatéraux du Mali qui aident les autorités maliennes à réformer le secteur de la sécurité, comme prévu dans l’Accord et conformément au sous-alinéa ii) de l’alinéa b) du paragraphe 14 de la présente résolution;

    Obligations découlant du droit international humanitaire et du droit international des droits de l’homme

    "32. Exhorte toutes les parties à s’acquitter des obligations que leur impose le droit international humanitaire pour ce qui est de respecter et de protéger le personnel, les installations et les secours humanitaires, et de prendre toutes les mesures nécessaires pour permettre et faciliter le libre passage des acteurs humanitaires, dans de bonnes conditions de sécurité et sans délai, afin que l’aide humanitaire puisse être apportée à tous ceux qui en ont besoin, tout en respectant les principes directeurs des Nations Unies concernant l’aide humanitaire et le droit international applicable;

    "33. Réaffirme que c’est aux autorités maliennes qu’il incombe au premier chef de protéger les civils au Mali, rappelle ses résolutions 1265 (1999), 1296 (2000), 1674 (2006), 1738 (2006) et 1894 (2009), relatives à la protection des civils en période de conflit armé, ses résolutions 1612 (2005), 1882 (2009), 1998 (2011), 2068 (2012), 2143 (2014) et 2225 (2015), relatives au sort des enfants en temps de conflit armé, et ses résolutions 1325 (2000), 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009), 1960 (2010), 2106 (2013) et 2122 (2013), concernant les femmes et la paix et la sécurité demande à la MINUSMA et à toutes les forces militaires présentes au Mali d’en tenir compte et de se conformer aux dispositions du droit international humanitaire, du droit des droits de l’homme et du droit des réfugiés, rappelle l’importance que revêt la formation à cet égard, et engage instamment toutes les parties à mettre en œuvre les conclusions sur les enfants en temps de conflit armé adoptées par son groupe de travail le 7 juillet 2014;

    Armes légères et de petit calibre

    "34. Demande aux autorités maliennes, aidées en cela par la MINUSMA, conformément au paragraphe 14 de la présente résolution, et par les partenaires internationaux, de s’attaquer au problème de la prolifération et du trafic illicite d’armes légères et de petit calibre conformément à la Convention de la CEDEAO sur les armes légères et de petit calibre, leurs munitions et autres matériels connexes et au Programme d’action en vue de prévenir, combattre et éliminer le commerce illicite des armes légères sous tous ses aspects, de sorte à assurer de façon sûre et efficace la gestion, l’entreposage et la sécurité de leurs stocks d’armes légères et de petit calibre, ainsi que la collecte et éventuellement la destruction des stocks excédentaires et des armes saisies, non marquées ou détenues illicitement, et souligne qu’il importe que ses résolutions 2017 (2011), 2117 (2013) et 2220 (2015) soient intégralement appliquées;

    Rapports du Secrétaire général et réexamen du mandat

    "35. Prie le Secrétaire général de lui faire rapport tous les trois mois après l’adoption de la présente résolution sur la suite donnée à celle-ci, en particulier sur les progrès accomplis dans l’application de l’Accord pour la paix et la réconciliation au Mali et l’action menée par la MINUSMA pour l’appuyer;

    "36. Affirme qu’il a l’intention de réexaminer le mandat de la MINUSMA avant le 30 juin 2016, s’il y a lieu, compte tenu notamment des progrès qui auront été faits dans l’application de l’Accord de paix;

    "37. Décide de demeurer activement saisi de la question.

    À l’intention des organes d’information • Document non officiel.


    0 0

    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria


    0 0

    Source: World Food Programme, Food and Agriculture Organization, Food Security Cluster
    Country: Mali


    0 0

    Source: World Food Programme, Food and Agriculture Organization, Food Security Cluster
    Country: Mali


    0 0

    Source: Afrique Verte
    Country: Mali

    Pour les « Prix Producteurs »

    Les prix collectés ce mois de Mai 2015, nous indiquent que :

    • Riz Local Gambiaka: le prix le plus cher est enregistré à Sofara avec 345 FCFA/kg suivi de Klela avec 325 FCFA/kg, Siengo a enregistré 320 FCFA/kg et le plus bas prix est enregistré à Niono avec 310 FCFA/kg.

    • Riz Local Adny11 : il est vendu à 350 FCFA/kg à Baguinéda (koulikoro) et 320 FCFA/kg à Siengo (Ségou).

    • Riz Local étuvé : il est vendu à 400 FCFA/kg à Niono et Siengo et Kléla 250 FCFA/kg pour la variété gambiaka.

    • Paddy : les prix des différentes variétés varient de 175 et 197 FCFA/kg le prix le plus bas est enregistré à Niono et le plus élevé à Tombouctou.

    • Les Semences : les prix ont évolué entre 275 à Siengo à 335 FCFA/kg enregistré à Baguinéda.


    0 0

    Source: Croix-Rouge Malienne
    Country: Mali

    Le Projet « Mobilisation Communautaire pour l’Eau, l’Hygiène et l’Assainissement dans les communes de Dougabougou, Markala, Sansanding, Dièdougou et Fatiné » dans le cercle de Ségou a comme objectif global l’amélioration de l’accès à l’eau potable, aux services d’assainissement de base et la promotion des pratiques d’hygiène des populations vulnérables des 36 villages couverts par le projet.

    La composante eau du projet vient de mettre à la disposition des populations des ouvrages hydrauliques composés de 24 pompes à motricité humaine et de 12 adductions d’eau sommaire. Cette initiative a permis d’améliorer considérablement le taux de couverture en eau potable dans la zone d’intervention mais surtout elle a entrainé une amélioration notable du service de l’eau dans les communes partenaires du projet. En effet, un total de 84 points d’eau potable ont été construits ; ceci a permis de satisfaire les besoins en eau potable de 33.600 personnes.

    La réception provisoire de ces infrastructures d’approvisionnement en eau potable a été une liesse populaire dans tous les villages bénéficiaires. En témoignent les propos des bénéficiaires du projet et notamment les autorités communales et villageoises. Selon M. Ingada Ag Alioumat, maire de Dougabougou, « Le rêve de tous les jours est devenu aujourd’hui une réalité et cela grâce l’intervention de la Croix-Rouge Malienne, la Croix-Rouge Danoise et l’Union Européenne. Par ma voix, j’engage les communautés bénéficiaires de ma commune à ne ménager aucun effort pour assurer une gestion saine de ces précieux équipements qui viennent de voir le jour »

    « Le défi à relever reste la desserte durable des localités en eau potable par le biais d’une gestion efficace des installations », rappelle M. Cédric Merel, responsable d’Infrastructures à la Délégation de la Commission Européenne au Mali. Pour atteindre cet objectif, le Président de la Croix-Rouge Malienne à Ségou, M. Tidiani Kanouté, a lancé un appel aux autorités communales et villageoises tout en leur assurant la disponibilité de la CRM pour accompagner la communauté.

    Le Coordinateur des Programmes de la CRM, M. Nouhoum Maiga, assure que le succès de ce projet, dans sa troisième année d’intervention, est aussi lié à la construction des infrastructures d’assainissement de base, la promotion de l’hygiène et le renforcement des capacités des parties prenantes. « C’est l’ensemble de toutes ces composantes ce qui permet de contribuer à l’atteinte de l’objectif du projet : l’amélioration de la santé et des conditions de vie des populations vulnérables dans la région de Ségou »

    Adama DIARRA
    Coordinateur du projet
    Croix-Rouge Malienne à Ségou


    0 0

    Source: International Committee of the Red Cross
    Country: Mali

    Genève / Bamako (CICR) – Tout quitter pour fuir la violence. C'est le sort qu'ont connu des milliers de personnes dans le nord du Mali, qui se retrouvent souvent sans moyens de subsistance et sans abri. Pour faire face à cette situation alarmante, près de 1 400 tonnes de vivres, des semences et des biens de première nécessité ont été distribuées aux populations de Mopti, Tombouctou, Gao et Kidal par le Comité international de la Croix-Rouge (CICR), en collaboration avec la Croix-Rouge malienne et les leaders communautaires.

    « Nous sommes très préoccupés par cette violence qui touche les communautés de la région et frappe aussi les humanitaires, privant ainsi la population d'une assistance pourtant vitale. Il est important que l'action humanitaire neutre et impartiale soit respectée, afin que ceux qui manquent de tout puissent recevoir l'aide dont ils ont besoin », a déclaré Christoph Luedi, chef de la délégation du CICR au Mali.

    Au cours des dernières semaines, du riz, des haricots, de l'huile et d'autres denrées alimentaires ont pu être distribués à quelque 63 000 personnes dans les régions de Mopti, Gao, Tombouctou et Kidal. 17 872 personnes de retour dans leurs communautés se sont par ailleurs vu remettre des moustiquaires, des ustensiles de cuisine, des produits d'hygiène et d'autres biens essentiels.

    « Cette aide a permis de répondre aux besoins les plus pressants, y compris ceux des communautés d'accueil, elles-mêmes aux prises avec des difficultés économiques et dont la générosité est mise à forte contribution », a expliqué Jean-Pierre Nereyabagabo, coordonnateur des programmes de sécurité économique du CICR au Mali.

    Plus de 100 000 agriculteurs du nord du pays ont en outre reçu quelque 500 tonnes de semences de riz, mil et sorgho et près de 873 000 têtes de bétail ont été vaccinées et traitées. Pour venir en aide aux populations touchées par la violence, le CICR a travaillé en étroite collaboration avec les volontaires de la Croix-Rouge malienne, les représentants des communautés locales, des prestataires de services et les services techniques de l'État malien.

    Informations complémentaires :
    Ananie Kulimushi Kashironge, CICR Bamako, tél. : +223 75 99 55 68
    Claire Kaplun, CICR Genève, tél. : +41 22 730 31 49 ou +41 79 244 64 05


    0 0

    Source: International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies
    Country: Gambia

    Summary

    The Gambia is facing a deteriorating food and nutrition crisis in 2015. At the end of May, ECHO reported that across the Sahel close to 7.5 million people required emergency food assistance1 – a figure of a similar order to the last major regional crisis in the Sahel in 2012, and demonstrating the urgent need for emergency response, particularly as the region enters its annual lean season (typically June to September).

    The Gambia – ranked as a least-developed, low-income, food-deficit country with high poverty and low human development – has a predominantly subsistence agrarian economy. Poverty levels remain high, with 55% of the population living on less than USD 2 per day and 18% considered food insecure according to WFP. Rain-fed subsistence agriculture is the main source of livelihood for the majority of the population.

    In 2014, The Gambia suffered from both late onset of rains and rain deficits, which led to late maturity of crops and a significant dry spell negatively affecting agriculture, particularly rice fields. Crop production was drastically reduced in comparison to that of the previous season (down 19% according to the Cadre Harmonisé2 ) and against five-year averages, with cereal, rice and groundnut harvests particularly affected. Many Gambian farmers now lack seeds and are unable to replant their fields, while there are also reports of depleted soil fertility, and a prevalence of salinity in rice growing areas.
    While markets are functioning and provide enough supply for household consumption, across the country households are affected by low purchasing power due to the poor harvest. Food prices have continued to increase, mainly due to the reduction in cereal production, and the unfavourable exchange rate of the Dalasi against major currencies. From January 2014 to March 2015 there were increases in the prices of coarse grains (millet 28%, maize 44% and sorghum 50%), rice both local (33%) and imported (49%), findo (102%) and of other basic food stuffs.


    0 0

    Source: International Organization for Migration
    Country: Eritrea, Gambia, Italy, Libya, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, World

    Italy - Migrant arrivals in Italy have topped 20,000 for each of the last two months, reports IOM as 2015 reaches its midpoint.

    Approximately 2,900 migrants were rescued at sea in the channel of Sicily in the last 48 hours. The operations have been carried out by the Italian maritime forces and by other EU ships patrolling the Mediterranean: two ships of the Irish and of the British Navy and the MOAS/MSF ship Phoenix.

    These new arrivals, according to IOM estimates, brings to about 66,500 the total number of migrants that arrived in Italy in the first six months of the year – a slight increase from 63,884 rescued at this time last year. The rescue operations are ongoing.

    Among the rescued migrants, brought to the ports of Lampedusa, Catania, Pozzallo (Sicily), and Reggio Calabria on the Italian mainland, most numerous were Eritreans, Nigerians, Gambians, Malians, Senegalese and other sub-Saharan nationals.

    Separately, the Italian Navy announced yesterday it had begun efforts to recover the bodies of an estimated 750 or more migrants lost in the channel of Sicily this past April, considered the worst tragedy occurring in the Mediterranean since 2000. The sunken vessel was found in early May by Italian authorities. So far, those bodies recovered, 24 in total, were brought to Malta soon after the tragedy. The sinking resulted in 28 survivors, many of whom confirmed to IOM staffers that their vessel carried around 800 passengers.

    The prosecutor’s office of Catania is still conducting its investigation.

    "IOM is grateful to the Italian government for having decided to recover the bodies of the migrants who died at sea last 19 April. Thanks to this operation, and to the work of the Italian Navy, families will have the opportunity to identify the bodies of their loved ones and to grieve for them,” said Director of the IOM Coordinating Office for the Mediterranean, Federico Soda.

    Meeting Monday (29 June) in London at the Headquarters of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) with IMO Secretary General Koji Sekimizu, IOM Director General William Lacy Swing addressed the ongoing situation of perilous migration by sea. Ambassador Swing recalled the agreement of cooperation the two organizations –

    IOM and IMO – concluded in 1974 and noted with satisfaction their close engagement over many years.

    “We recognized that unsafe mixed migration across the oceans and seas has been a serious concern for decades and that it has increased dramatically in recent years posing a major challenge to the international community,” Ambassador Swing said.

    The two organizations Monday also announced a seven-point programme to confront the humanitarian crisis. IOM and IMO pledged to:

    1. Establish an inter-agency platform for information sharing on unsafe mixed migration by sea, in collaboration with other interested agencies, as soon as possible;

    2. Disseminate information material on the dangers of unsafe and irregular migration by sea, in collaboration with other interested agencies;

    3. Promote the relevant provisions of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), the International Convention on Maritime Search and Rescue (SAR), the Convention on Facilitation of International Maritime Traffic (FAL), and international migration law;

    4. Support the relevant technical cooperation programmes of each organization;

    5. Remain engaged by setting up technical or advisory bodies, as appropriate, on terms and conditions to be mutually agreed upon in each case;

    6. Facilitate discussions to find solutions to unsafe migration by sea;

    7. Urge the international community to take robust measures against people smugglers who operate without fear or remorse and who deliberately and knowingly endanger the lives of thousands of migrants at sea.

    For further information, please contact Flavio Di Giacomo at IOM Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int or Joel Millman, IOM Geneva, Tel: + 41 79 103 87 20, Email: jmillman@iom.int


    0 0

    Source: International Organization for Migration
    Country: Cameroon, Italy, Nigeria, United States of America

    Cameroon - Since the beginning of 2014, Northeast Nigeria has witnessed an increase in Boko Haram’s violent attacks, leading to widespread displacement in the country with a spillover effect in neighboring countries including Niger, Chad, and Cameroon.

    In the Far North Region of Cameroon, an estimated 81,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs) and 36,000 returnees have fled Boko Haram attacks.

    IDPs, returnees and host families are currently living in precarious conditions and are in urgent need of humanitarian assistance to meet their basic needs, and the situation could further worsen with the beginning of the rainy season.

    IOM Cameroon has scaled up its response to address the needs of displaced populations and returnees, focusing on emergency non-food item interventions in the Department of Mayo-Tsanaga.

    From 19th June to 26th June, with funding from the Government of Italy, IOM distributed 1,000 emergency non-food item (NFI) kits to the most vulnerable IDP, returnee and host community families. These items were distributed in Makatam Sud (Mokolo Arrondissement) and Mozogo (Mayo-Moskota Arrondissement), in the Department of Mayo-Tsanaga. In the coming weeks, IOM will distribute another 250 emergency NFI kits.

    Thanks to a contribution from the Government of the United States (USAID/OFDA), 250 additional emergency NFI kits were distributed on 19th June 2015 in Makatam Sud (Mokolo Arrondissement).

    “Boko Haram attacks in Cameroon displaced populations who were already vulnerable to communities with scarce resources. Many of these people have witnessed terrible events that left them traumatized. Although there is a great solidarity and generosity in the Far North Region of Cameroon, this vulnerable population needs urgent humanitarian assistance before shared resources run out and their situation worsen further,” said IOM Emergency Coordinator Ahmed Abdi.

    For further information, please contact Ahmed Abdi, IOM Cameroon, Tel: +237 680 180 594, Email: ahabdi@iom.int


    0 0

    Source: Assessment Capacities Project
    Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Haiti, India, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Yemen

    Snapshot 24–30 June 2015

    Burundi: Turnout at the parliamentary elections was low. Voting stations were targeted and there was a spate of grenade attacks in the capital: several people were injured. Around 1,000 Burundians are leaving the country every day: 62,000 refugees are now in Tanzania, 45,000 in Rwanda, and 10,600 in DRC.

    South Sudan: Households in some areas of Unity and Upper Nile states are suspected to be facing Catastrophe (IPC Phase 5) food security outcomes. 5–8% of the country’s population are suffering severe acute malnutrition.

    Nigeria: 3.5 million people are expected to be in need of food assistance in the northeast between July and September. Eastern Yobe, central and eastern Borno, northern Adamawa and IDP settlements are worst affected. More than 250 people have been killed in violence in the northeast since 29 May, with at least 77 killed between 22 and 29 June. Displacement continues.

    Updated: 30/06/2015. Next update 07/07/2015.

    Global Emergency Overview Web Interface


    0 0

    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Côte d'Ivoire, Mali, Mauritania

    Bamako, Mali | AFP | mardi 30/06/2015 - 14:25 GMT

    Le groupe jihadiste Ansar Dine a revendiqué mardi les attaques du week-end dernier contre deux localités du Mali proches de la Mauritanie et de la Côte d'Ivoire, et menacé de s'en prendre à ces deux pays.

    L'attaque samedi matin contre un camp militaire à Nara (centre) a fait trois tués parmi les militaires maliens, ainsi que neuf chez les assaillants, selon le gouvernement, tandis qu'à Fakola (sud) dimanche, des bâtiments administratifs et de sécurité ont été saccagés.

    "Nous revendiquons l'attaque de Nara et celle de Fakola, terres d'islam, pour punir les ennemis de l'islam", a déclaré par téléphone Ismaël Khalil, membre d'Ansar Dine, un des groupes jihadistes qui ont contrôlé le nord du Mali de mars-avril 2012 jusqu'au lancement, en janvier 2013, d'une intervention militaire internationale à l'initiative de la France.

    "Nous allons multiplier les attaques en Côte d'Ivoire, au Mali et en Mauritanie, des pays qui travaillent avec les ennemis de l'islam", a affirmé à l'AFP ce prédicateur radical malien.

    Formé à l'école coranique dans la région de Mopti (centre), avant d'effectuer des séjours en Arabie saoudite et au Nigeria, Ismaël Khalil, qui appartenait à une secte islamiste, avait rejoint en 2012 dans le Nord le chef d'Ansar Dine, Iyad Ag Ghaly, a indiqué à l'AFP une source de sécurité malienne.

    Les attaques jihadistes ont commencé à déborder du Nord vers le centre du pays, limitrophe de la Mauritanie, depuis le début de l'année, mais le Sud, frontalier de la Côte d'Ivoire et du Burkina Faso, était épargné jusqu'à l'attaque de Misséni le 10 juin, au cours de laquelle un militaire malien avait été tué et deux autres blessés.

    Deux autres groupes radicaux alliés d'Ansar Dine "ont également participé aux attaques de ce week-end", a affirmé à l'AFP une source sécuritaire malienne, précisant qu'ils étaient "composés de Maliens et d'étrangers qui tentent de s'implanter au Centre et vers la frontière ivoirienne".

    Un ancien altermondialiste malien, Tahirou Bah, a aussi revendiqué les attaques de Nara et Fakola au nom du Mouvement populaire pour la libération du Mali (MPPLM), se présentant comme le secrétaire général d'un mouvement armé "basé à la frontière avec le Burkina Faso".

    "Nous revendiquons les attaques de ce week-end. Nous sommes un groupe armé qui veut le changement de régime au Mali. Nous sommes laïcs", a déclaré à l'AFP M. Bah, qui a dirigé un mouvement altermondialiste, "les Sans-voix", ayant participé il y a quelques mois à un rassemblement contre la France.

    sd/mrb/sst/mba


    0 0

    Source: Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development
    Country: Mali

    La faim : un péril mortel pour les plus vulnérablesdépistage de la malnutrition chez les jeunes enfants de Bamako.

    Depuis plusieurs années, le Mali fait face à une insécurité alimentaire grave et à des taux élevés de malnutrition. Ce contexte a été aggravé en 2011 par la crise alimentaire qui a touché le Mali suite à des pluies tardives et de longues périodes de sécheresse, à laquelle s’est ensuite ajoutée en 2012 la crise politique et sécuritaire liée aux évènements au nord du pays (facteurs conjoncturels). Ceci a entrainé une dégradation globale de la situation alimentaire et nutritionnelle de la population avec les conséquences que cela engendre : un péril mortel pour les populations les plus vulnérables à la faim, les enfants.

    Dépister pour lutter contre la malnutrition aigüe

    Les équipes d’ACTED sont intervenues, avec le soutien de l’UNICEF, de décembre 2014 à avril 2015 pour lutter contre la malnutrition aigüe en dépistant plus de 12 000 enfants de 6 à 59 mois avec l’aide des acteurs de santé locaux. Parmi ceux-ci, plus de 100 cas particulièrement graves ont été pris en charges par les partenaires de santé spécialisés sur ces questions. Suite à ces traitements pas moins de 97% d’entre eux ont recouvré un état nutritionnel ne mettant plus leur vie en danger et leur permettant de retrouver une vie normale.

    Renforcer les capacités des structures de santé pour une action durable

    En outre, conscient que la sécurité de ces enfants vulnérables ne pourra être garantie que par une action durable, ACTED a fait de la coordination et de la formation des neufs structures de santé partenaires un enjeu de toute première priorité sur ce projet. Pour cette raison, ACTED a renforcé les capacités des acteurs de santé en menant de multiples séances de sensibilisation. Les femmes enceintes et allaitantes ont aussi pu profité de ce transfert de compétences par des séances de sensibilisation spécifiques à la nutrition ainsi que des démonstrations culinaires.


    0 0

    Source: Consortium of International Agricultural Research Centers
    Country: Benin, Botswana, Burundi, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Mali, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Togo, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Zimbabwe

    African crops and livestock in a changing climate
    June 29, 2015 by Julian Ramirez-Villegas
    Cross-posted from the CCAFS blog.

    After some intense 5-6 years of CCAFS research and impact, a set of newly released CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) Working Papers highlight both climate change impacts and opportunities for African crop and livestock production systems. The papers summarise science on climate change impacts and adaptation, and present new information specifically targeted to the 42th meeting of the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technical Advice (SBSTA), held in Bonn at the beginning of June 2015.

    Climate change and African crop production

    The SBSTA crops paper, produced in collaboration between CIAT and ILRI scientists, shows that, under our current emissions trajectory (RCP8.5, where global warming by the end of the 21st century is between 6-8 ºC), common bean, maize, banana and finger millet are projected to reduce their suitable areas significantly (30-50%) across the continent, and will need some kind of adaptation plan, or be replaced with other crops.

    On the other hand, sorghum, cassava, yam, and pearl millet show either little area loss or even gains in suitable areas. Suitability projections suggest that opportunities may arise from expanding cropping areas in certain countries and regions: cassava production may move towards more temperate regions in Southern Africa, and yam suitability outside West Africa may increase.
    The findings bring valuable insights that can support African countries adapt their agriculture production to a changing climate. The paper shows that despite inherent uncertainties in producing climate projections for crops, most of the projected impacts, if no adaptation measures are undertaken, are robust.

    Read the full story here.

    Livestock production under climate change: what do we need to know?

    The livestock paper (available here) summarises what we know about climate change impacts on livestock systems in Africa. With livestock systems already engaging 600 million farmers around the globe, and the livestock sector continuing to develop as demand for meat increases, more robust and detailed information is urgently needed. This to better understand the trade-offs between various livestock adaptation options so that farmers and policy makers can make informed decisions around climate adaptation and resilience building.

    The negative effects of increased temperature on feed intake, reproduction and performance on various livestock species is something that is reasonably well understood. For example, for most livestock species, such as cattle, sheep, goats, pig and chickens, temperatures between 10 and 30°C is when they perform the best. But for each 1°C increase above that, all species reduce their feed intake by 3-5 percent. Without a doubt, this will have far reaching effects on the quality and quantity of livestock species.

    There are many options that can help livestock keepers adapt. The working paper illustrates trade-offs between various climate adaptation options that livestock farmers can take on. Options include changes in livestock breeds and species, improved feeding better grazing and manure management, and use of weather information and weather-index insurance.

    In spite of progress in knowledge on climate change and livestock since 2009, we need much more work to ensure that we will have the knowledge and political support needed to build resilient livestock systems in the future. A key question revolves around how we can create the political will to bolster the resources going into livestock research for development.

    Read the full story here.

    Further: A broader set of UNFCCC and SBSTA related stories is also available from the CCAFS blog, here. Further: Note the reference to the crops paper in the African submission to SBSTA (page 34). Share this:


    0 0

    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Côte d'Ivoire, Mali, Mauritania

    amako, Mali | AFP | Tuesday 6/30/2015 - 15:37 GMT

    by Serge DANIEL

    Jihadist group Ansar Dine on Tuesday claimed responsibility for two weekend attacks in Mali near the borders with Mauritania and Ivory Coast, and threatened to strike both countries.

    Three soldiers and nine militants were killed on Saturday as a military camp came under attack in the town of Nara, according to the government, while public and police buildings were ransacked in Fakola on Sunday.

    "We are claiming the attack at Nara and the one at Fakola -- Islamic lands -- to punish the enemies of Islam," Ismael Khalil, a radical preacher and member of Ansar Dine, said by telephone.

    He added that the militants would "multiply the attacks in Ivory Coast, Mali and Mauritania, countries that work with the enemies of Islam".

    Little is known about Khalil but a Malian security source said he attended Koranic school in the central region of Mopti before visiting Saudi Arabia and Nigeria and eventually joining up with Ansar Dine leader Iyad Ag Ghaly in northern Mali in 2012.

    Jihadist attacks are normally confined to Mali's restive northern desert but areas bordering Mauritania in the narrow centre of the country have been targeted since the beginning of the year.

    Southern settlements near Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso were spared until an attack on the town of Misseni on June 10, during which a Malian soldier was killed and two others wounded.

    • Brutal regime -

    Two other radical groups linked to Ansar Dine took part in the weekend's attacks, a separate security source told AFP, adding that they were "composed of Malians and foreigners trying establish themselves in the centre and at the Ivorian border".

    Tahirou Bah, a former prominent anti-globalisation campaigner, also claimed the weekend attacks on behalf of the "Popular Movement for the Liberation of Mali".

    The former leader of pressure group "les Sans Voix" -- or "The Voiceless" -- presented his new group as an armed movement based on the Burkina Faso border.

    "We claim the attacks this weekend. We are an armed group that wants regime change in Mali. We are lay people," he told AFP.

    Mali's vast semi-arid north came under the control of Ansar Dine -- which is Arabic for Defenders of Faith -- and two other jihadist groups, Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb and the Movement for Oneness and Jihad in West Africa, in April 2012.

    A move south towards the capital by the extremist fighters, who imposed a brutal version of sharia on inhabitants, prompted France to intervene in January 2013, pounding their positions in the north and centre of the country.

    • Reinforcements -

    Their organisational structure smashed, small pockets of armed Islamists managed nevertheless to remain active, carrying out occasional deadly attacks in the desert.

    The United States placed Ansar Dine on its terror blacklist in 2013, accusing it of close links with Al-Qaeda and of torturing and killing opponents in the north.

    The militia was set up in late 2011 by Ag Ghaly, who is also on the US blacklist as a long-time fighter against the Malian government who led a 1990 rebellion by the Popular Movement for the Liberation of Azawad (MPLA).

    Ivory Coast said on Monday it had sent "reinforcements" to its border with Mali, without specifying numbers or which branch of the security forces they were from.

    A government spokesman said the country was "organising to avoid being affected" by the threat of jihadism.

    MINUSMA, the 11,500-strong United Nations peacekeeping mission in Mali, said in a statement it condemned "in the strongest terms the two terrorist attacks" in Nara and Fakola.

    "MINUSMA once again emphasises the urgency of combining all efforts to counter terrorism threats to Mali and to its people," said the force, which had its mandate extended for another year by the UN Security Council on Monday.

    sd/mrb/sst/ft/hmn


    0 0

    Source: IRIN
    Country: Niger, Nigeria

    Niamey/Dakar , 30 juin 2015 (IRIN) - En novembre dernier, des membres de Boko Haram sont arrivés chez Fanna Liman Mustafa, 25 ans, et ont incendié sa maison de Baga, dans le nord-est du Nigeria. Elle a décidé de fuir au Niger avec ses quatre enfants. Le destin a voulu qu'elle ait de la chance : les militants islamistes sont revenus au mois de janvier et ont massacré des centaines, voire des milliers de civils.

    « Nous avons tout perdu dans l'incendie causé par les attaques », a dit à IRIN Mme Mustafa, en expliquant que les militants étaient arrivés de la région de Diffa, au sud-est du Niger, avec les vêtements qu'ils avaient sur le dos et rien d'autre.

    Les premières familles de réfugiés sont arrivées au Niger en 2013, mais les militants de Boko Haram ont multiplié les violences dans la région au cours de ces derniers mois, ce qui a entraîné une explosion du nombre de réfugiés et une crise humanitaire dont l'ampleur ne cesse de s'accentuer, sans retenir l'attention des médias internationaux.

    Environ 150 000 déplacés de Diffa ont un besoin urgent d'assistance, notamment de nourriture, d'après les agences d'aide humanitaire. La ville de Diffa est devenue la cible des attaques de Boko Haram, ce qui veut dire que les familles qui hébergeaient des réfugiés commencent à se déplacer.

    « Ils (les réfugiés) continuent d'arriver à Diffa », a expliqué Akébou Sawadogo, directeur de Save the Children au Niger. « Les arrivées ont considérablement alourdi le fardeau des communautés hôtes locales qui étaient déjà très vulnérables ».

    La majorité des réfugiés ont peu ou pas d'accès aux soins de santé et à l'éducation et ont un accès insuffisant aux services de base, comme l'eau et un abri.

    Les évaluations de la sécurité alimentaire sont toujours en cours, mais au moins 65 pour cent des personnes déplacées, y compris des réfugiés, des rapatriés et des personnes déplacées à l'intérieur de leur propre pays (PDIP), disent qu'elles n'ont pas un accès suffisant à la nourriture, d'après Save the Children.

    Comme Mme Mustafa, la majorité des réfugiés nigérians vivent au sein des communautés hôtes, car le premier camp officiel n'a été ouvert que le 30 décembre.

    Le Haut Commissariat des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés (HCR) a organisé la relocalisation de quelques centaines de personnes vers les camps, mais d'après les estimations, 60 pour cent des personnes déplacées sont encore « sans abri » et vivent dans des constructions de fortune érigées près des arbres, indique la dernière évaluation de la Croix-Rouge internationale.

    Pas assez de nourriture pour tout le monde

    Les habitants de Diffa luttaient déjà pour leur survie : la moitié de la population vit avec moins de 1,25 dollar par jour et les taux de malnutrition sont parmi les plus élevés d'Afrique. Aujourd'hui, les ménages locaux partagent le peu de nourriture qu'ils ont avec les réfugiés.

    Le Bureau de la coordination des affaires humanitaires des Nations Unies (OCHA) a expliqué que chaque famille héberge 17 personnes en moyenne.

    En outre, bon nombre d'habitants n'ont pas pu ensemencer leurs champs l'année dernière, en raison de la situation sécuritaire.

    En conséquence, la région de Diffa n'a produit que 55 pour cent des céréales nécessaires pour satisfaire les besoins alimentaires annuels de ses habitants ; elle a donc un déficit céréalier de plus de 80 000 tonnes, d'après OCHA.

    « Les récoltes n'ont pas été très bonnes à Diffa et la combinaison de l'insécurité et des récoltes insuffisantes explique qu'il est difficile de nourrir les familles », a dit le Benoît Thiry, Directeur pays du Programme alimentaire mondiale (PAM) au Niger.

    Cette année, la période de soudure, qui a déjà débuté, sera plus difficile que d'habitude. M. Thiry a dit que le PAM était particulièrement préoccupé par la mauvaise situation nutritionnelle des enfants de la région.

    Le taux de malnutrition aiguë globale des enfants de moins de cinq ans de la région de Diffa était de 13,8 pour cent en 2014, ce qui veut dire que le taux de malnutrition était pratiquement deux fois supérieur à celui du Cameroun et de la Guinée-Bissau, par exemple. Le nombre d'enfants de moins de cinq ans admis dans les centres de nutrition a été multiplié par deux et par trois dans certaines communautés, en raison notamment de la crise des réfugiés.

    Entre le 1er janvier et le 26 avril, 8 407 cas de malnutrition aiguë sévère ont été enregistrés chez les enfants de moins de cinq ans de la région, d'après la ldernière évaluation des Nations Unies. En 2014, 3 168 cas avaient été recensés durant la même période.

    « Si vous allez à Diffa aujourd'hui, les principaux besoins des communautés – d'après ce qu'elles disent – sont la nourriture et l'eau », a dit M. Sawadogo. « La sécurité alimentaire reste donc notre principale préoccupation en ce qui concerne les besoins humanitaires, car plus il y a de ménages en situation de vulnérabilité, plus on doit distribuer d'aide alimentaire aux déplacés ».

    Le Directeur pays de Save the Children a dit que les bailleurs de fonds ne pouvaient pas couvrir tous les besoins alimentaires des ménages de Diffa à cause du manque de financements.

    L'appel des Nations Unies pour le Plan de réponse stratégique pour la région de Diffa - d'un montant de 31,2 millions de dollars - n'a été financé qu'à 55 pour cent, d'après le Service de suivi financier des Nations Unies. Il faudrait environ 14 millions de dollars pour poursuivre les opérations jusqu'à la fin de l'année.

    Pas de papiers, pas d'accès aux services

    Au Niger, les Nigérians doivent présenter les bons documents pour obtenir le statut juridique de réfugiés et avoir droit à l'intégralité des prestations, comme l'aide alimentaire et l'accès aux camps. « Aujourd'hui, j'ai des difficultés à accéder aux services de base », a dit à IRIN Binta Ali, en expliquant que les extraits d'acte de naissance des membres de sa famille et leurs autres documents administratifs avaient été détruits lors des attaques commises par Boko Haram dans leur village, au Nigeria, et qu'ils n'avaient donc plus de preuves de leur identité.

    Mme Ali n'est pas la seule dans ce cas.

    D'après le ministre de l'Intérieur du Niger, plus de 60 pour cent des déplacés sont dépourvus de documents d'identité pour prouver leur nationalité.

    « Sans acte de naissance ou document d'identité, les populations visées n'ont pas accès à leurs droits élémentaires, elles ne bénéficient pas de tous leurs droits [en tant que réfugiés] et elles risquent de devenir apatrides », a expliqué à IRIN Alassane Seyboune, secrétaire général du ministère de l'Intérieur.

    Abdel Kadar Gonimi, un Nigérien qui vivait au Nigeria et qui a été contraint de revenir au Niger, a dit à IRIN : « Chaque fois que je veux accéder aux services destinés aux réfugiés, je dois m'expliquer plusieurs fois pour pouvoir bénéficier des prestations ».

    La commission nationale des réfugiés du Niger dit qu'elle a enregistré plus de 10 000 réfugiés depuis la mi-mars et qu'elle espère en enregistrer 200 000 d'ici la fin de l'année, avec le soutien du HCR. C'est un objectif ambitieux, car il est difficile de prendre contact avec certaines communautés de la région de Diffa en raison de la menace posée par Boko Haram.

    « La situation est particulière à Diffa, car il ne s'agit pas d'une réponse humanitaire traditionnelle, avec des réfugiés hébergés dans des camps », a expliqué M. Sawadogo. « C'est plus facile de les compter dans les camps, c'est plus facile de contrôler la situation et de fournir de l'aide. La communauté humanitaire fait de son mieux, mais le défi, ici, consiste à déterminer le nombre de personnes présentes et à trouver le meilleur moyen de leur venir en aide ».

    bb/jl/ag-mg/amz


    0 0

    Source: UN Security Council
    Country: Mali, World

    SC/11956
    7479th Meeting (PM)

    Peacekeeping, peacebuilding and children in armed conflict had been the centrepieces of the Security Council’s work over the past four weeks, said the Permanent Representative of Malaysia, President of the body for June, in a monthly wrap-up meeting this afternoon.

    Providing an overview of the month, Ramlan Bin Ibrahim said that the Council had held a total of 26 meetings — including 22 public meetings — and three Arria-formula meetings on the human rights situation in Darfur, barrel-bombs in Syria and climate change. It had adopted 22 texts, including 15 press statements, an alarming number of which were in relation to terrorist attacks.

    Indeed, a new culture of terrorism continued to loom large over the Council’s agenda over the course of the month, he said. The situations in Syria, Yemen, Iraq and other hotspots remained of concern, with the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant/Sham (ISIL/ISIS), Al-Nusra Front, Boko Haram and other non-State armed groups posing a major threat.

    The Council also faced a number of intractable challenges that remained before it, including the question of Palestine, on which he said the Council had been ineffective for far too long.

    During its presidency, Malaysia had sought to further international protection norms for children in armed conflict, including by adding abduction to the list of triggers that could add a party to the Secretary-General’s list of grave human rights violators. Resolution 2225 (2015) was adopted during an open debate where the Council heard from more than 80 speakers.

    Mr. Ibrahim said that, since the start of 2015, the Council had engaged in a number of important norm-setting initiatives, including in the area of protection of journalists and women. “The Council had proved its dynamism in rising to new challenges,” including by meeting on the issue of migrants who faced grave challenges when fleeing their homes, in particular by sea.

    Migration, along with conflicts in the Middle East and Africa, were among the issues that lay ahead in the Council’s work, he continued. In addition, there was a need to work closely with the General Assembly on the selection of the next Secretary-General.

    When the floor was opened for debate, speakers said that June had been a productive but challenging month for the Council. There had been increased threats to peace and security around the world. Problems remained in Yemen, Libya and Syria, where the Council remained divided and unable to act. The Arria meeting on barrel bombs had again reminded members of the plight of thousands of innocent people in Syria who remained under constant attack, some said. Meanwhile, others urged the Council to ensure that the political vacuum in Yemen was not abused by terrorists, and called for the speedy declaration of humanitarian pauses in that country.

    Some speakers noted that the month had been darkened by terrorist attacks that had struck many countries, including several members of the Council. ISIL was taking hold in Iraq and laying roots in other countries throughout the region. In that regard, there were a number of calls for all countries of the region — and across the world — to set aside their differences and work to combat the common enemy that was terrorism.

    The situation in Burundi had preoccupied the Council throughout the month, many said, citing divisions among members on how best to assist the country as it faced conflict and violence associated with President Pierre Nkurunziza’s bid for a third term. In that regard, the representative of the United States said that Burundi had moved forward recklessly with its elections in an environment that was not free, fair or transparent, and that the Government was intimidating those who disagreed with it. Many speakers supported the mediation efforts by the United Nations, the African Union and others and called for a speedy exit to the crisis.

    Other conflicts in Africa had also remained on the Council’s agenda. The situation in Darfur remained highly problematic, some said, with little or no progress made in its humanitarian or security situation. Millions of displaced people still could not return to their homes, and the implementation of the Doha Declaration by some parties to the conflict had not progressed. The Government of Sudan continued to restrict the activities of the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID), to the point where a peacekeeper had died after being denied flight clearance for medical evacuation. While some stressed that UNAMID was needed now more than ever, others called for an agreement on the phased withdrawal of the Mission in a manner that was acceptable to all parties.

    The situation in Mali was encouraging, many said, recalling that a full agreement on peace and reconciliation had been signed in Bamako on 20 June. The full and good faith implementation of that agreement by the signatories was crucial. The United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) — which had been issued a new mandate by the Council this month — would be critical in monitoring the agreement’s implementation.

    On peacekeeping and peacebuilding, a number of delegations welcomed the Council’s direct interaction with Force Commanders throughout the month. In that regard, the delegate of France recalled that the Panel on Peace Operations chaired by José Ramos-Horta had submitted its report to the Secretary-General on 17 June. That item, which included hundreds of recommendations, should now lead to a study conducted by the Secretary-General, who should propose an “implementation report” that would be drafted with Member States and presented at the Assembly’s next session. Recommendations should be addressed both to the Security Council, troop- and police-contributing countries and all stakeholders in the maintenance of peace, he said.

    A number of delegations congratulated Malaysia for its shepherding of resolution 2225 (2015) focusing on the recruitment and abduction of children. However, the representative of Venezuela said that it remained a source of concern that Israel, which continued to perpetrate crimes against children in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, had not been included on the Secretary-General’s list of those committing grave violations against children in armed conflict.

    Many speakers also addressed the Council’s working methods, noting that it was holding more public meetings and working more transparently. However, others expressed concern that the joint briefing of the three subsidiary bodies dealing with counter-terrorism on 16 June the Council had deviated from the existing practice, as non-Council members were not granted the right to participate in the discussions under rule 37 of the Provisional Rules of Procedure.

    Some stressed that the working methods needed to be more engaging and interactive. In that regard, the representative of the United Kingdom said that the high level of formality in the Council’s work could limit the benefit of its interactions with the experts that came before it. A dialogue should be an exchange, not a broadcast of views, he said. Others agreed, adding that the Council should better manage its time.

    The representative of Spain proposed a new strategy regarding the penholder for the Council’s resolutions other products, suggesting that a policy of “co-penholders” — namely, one permanent and one non-permanent member of the Council — could be adopted.

    On the election of the new Secretary-General in 2016, a number of speakers called for a clear timeline for appointment and a more transparent, inclusive selection process. Some stressed that, all qualifications being equal, it was high time for a woman to lead the United Nations. Meanwhile, other speakers rejected attempts to rewrite Article 97 of the United Nations Charter on the Secretary-General’s selection.

    Finally, many delegations made reference to the review of resolution 1325 (2000) on women, peace and security, calling for high-level participation in the debate that would take place on that resolution in October.

    The meeting began at 3:08 p.m. and ended at 4:55 p.m.

    For information media. Not an official record.


    0 0

    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Senegal

    Rice, millet, sorghum, and maize are the primary staple foods in Senegal.
    Groundnuts are both an important source of protein and a commonly grown cash crop. Imported rice is consumed daily by the vast majority of households in Senegal particularly in Dakar and Touba urban centers. Local rice is produced and consumed in the Senegal River Valley. St. Louis is a major market for the Senegal River Valley. Millet is consumed in central regions where Kaolack is the most important regional market. Maize is produced and consumed in areas around Kaolack, Tambacounda, and the Senegal River Valley. Some maize is also imported mainly from the international market. High demand for all commodities exists in and around Touba and Dakar. They are also important centers for stocking and storage during the lean season. The harvests of grains and groundnuts begin at the end of the marketing year in October; and stocks of locally produced grains are drawn down throughout the marketing year. Senegal depends more on imports from the international market for rice than from cross border trade which mainly includes cattle from Mali and Mauritania that supply Dakar and surrounding markets.


    0 0

    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Niger

    Millet, maize, cowpea, and imported rice are the most important food commodities. Millet is consumed by both rural and poor urban households throughout the country. Maize and imported rice are most important for urban households, while cowpea is mainly consumed by poor households in rural and urban areas as a protein source. Niamey is the most important national market and an international trade center, and also supplies urban households. Tillaberi is also an urban center that supplies the surrounding area. Gaya market represents a main urban market for maize with cross-border connections. Maradi, Tounfafi, and Diffa are regional assembly and cross-border markets for Niger and other countries in the region. These are markets where households and herders coming from the northern cereal deficit areas regularly buy their food. Agadez and Zinder are also important national and regional markets. Nguigmi and Abalak are located in pastoral areas, where people are heavily dependent on cereal markets for their food supply. They are particularly important during the rainy season, when herders are confined to the pastoral zone


older | 1 | .... | 390 | 391 | (Page 392) | 393 | 394 | .... | 728 | newer