Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

ReliefWeb - Updates

older | 1 | .... | 378 | 379 | (Page 380) | 381 | 382 | .... | 728 | newer

    0 0

    Source: Government of Germany
    Country: Lebanon, Mali, Serbia, Syrian Arab Republic

    On 3 June, the Federal Cabinet decided to extend the Bundeswehr’s three deployments abroad in Kosovo (KFOR), Mali (MINUSMA) and Lebanon (UNIFIL). The Bundestag still has to give its approval.

    Stable situation in Kosovo

    The mission in the Republic of Kosovo (KFOR) is to continue unchanged; up to 1850 troops can be deployed there. Although the situation in the country is generally regarded as being stable, there continues to be a considerable potential for conflict in the Kosovo-Serb dominated north of the country. It is therefore still necessary for international troops to remain in order to ensure a safe environment.

    Germany has been supporting Kosovo since 1999 and to date has provided development cooperation funds amounting to at least 480 million euros. This funding has made a valuable contribution towards the country’s social and economic development. For 2015, aid to the tune of 25.5 million euros has been earmarked to develop the country’s energy grid and to improve sewage and waste disposal.

    Border management in Lebanon

    The Bundeswehr is also to carry on participating in the UN-led mission in Lebanon (UNIFIL). According to the Cabinet decision, up to 300 troops are to continue being deployed off Lebanon’s coast until 30 June 2016.

    Their task is to safeguard Lebanon’s maritime borders and to develop the capabilities of the Lebanese navy so that the country is soon able to protect its own borders. Furthermore, UNIFIL is making a key contribution towards the normalisation of relations between Israel and Lebanon – both countries appreciate German’s efforts and are keen to see the mission continued.

    Support in managing the refugee crisis

    The civil war in Syria has resulted in more than one million people seeking refuge in Lebanon – that corresponds to one quarter of the latter’s population. Germany has provided Lebanon with around 247 million euros since 2012 to help it cope with the influx of refugees: among other things, the German Government is paying the school fees for 60 per cent of Syrian refugee children in Lebanon.

    Stabilising security in Mali

    The mandate for the Bundeswehr’s participation in the UN mission in Mali (MINUSMA) has also been extended until 30 June 2016, with the number of military personnel involved remaining the same at up to 150 soldiers. The aim of the mission is to stabilise the security situation and the political process concerning the future of northern Mali and to help humanitarian organisations gain access to the country.

    The deployment is part of the German Government’s wide-ranging commitment to Mali within the scope of a networked approach. This also includes development cooperation and crisis prevention funds, as well as the training of police and security forces within the framework of the EU Training Mission (EUTM).


    0 0

    Source: International Committee of the Red Cross
    Country: Senegal

    SANTE

    5 structures de santé soutenues par le CICR ont permis à plus de 16 000 personnes, en majorité des femmes et des enfants, d’accéder aux soins de santé primaire. Il s’agit de consultations curatives et préventives, de vaccinations, de suivi nutritionnel et d’accouchements assistés. Ÿ Près de 8 000 personnes ont participé à des séances de sensibilisation communautaire contre les infections sexuellement transmissibles et le VIH/Sida. Le projet VIH/Sida du CICR a été transféré aux autorités sanitaires régionales et locales en août 2014. Ÿ En collaborant avec les autorités sanitaires, le CICR a contribué à la mise en œuvre de campagnes nationales de vaccination contre la poliomyélite et au renforcement nutritionnel en vitamine A, associé au déparasitage des vers intestinaux, pour plus de 11 200 enfants vivant dans des zones affectées par le conflit armé dans la region de la Casamance au Sénégal. Ÿ 5 victimes du conflit armé, blessées par balle ou l’explosion d’une mine, ont été assistées par le CICR pour la prise en charge de leurs soins médicaux et chirurgicaux au centre hospitalier régional de Ziguinchor.

    EAU, HABITAT ET ASSAINISSEMENTŸ

    L’accès à l’eau potable a été facilité pour 2 940 bénéficiaires grâce à la construction de 4 nouveaux puits à grand diamètre, la réhabilitation de 7 anciens puits et l’installation de 2 pompes manuelles. Ÿ 11 artisans réparateurs de pompes manuelles habitant dans les zones affectées par le conflit, ont été formés par le CICR et équipés de caisses à outils. Ÿ 28 membres de comités de gestion de points d’eau villageois (dont une dizaine de femmes) ont été formés et sont en cours de mise en relation avec les artisans réparateurs locaux, dans le cadre de la maintenance préventive et curative des pompes manuelles. Ÿ Le CICR a contribué à améliorer le rendement de la production rizicole pour 600 villageois avec la construction de 2 ouvrages d’art sur deux digues de retenue d’eau. Ÿ Les familles retournées dans leurs villages d’origine en Casamance (2 200 personnes) ont reconstruit 215 maisons. Le CICR leur a fourni les matériaux nécessaires pour la toiture (tôles, pointes et rôniers).


    0 0

    Source: European Commission Humanitarian Aid department
    Country: Niger, Nigeria

    It’s one of the poorest regions in the world: Diffa, a city in south-eastern Niger housing a population facing extreme vulnerability. Since 2013, waves of refugees fleeing Boko Haram's violence from neighbouring Nigeria have exacerbated an already critical situation.

    Jean de Lestrange, European Commission's humanitarian expert, has just visited Niger to assess the needs and the response of the Commission. Our colleague Isabel Coello has spoken with him on his return.

    Where exactly is Diffa and what are its main characteristics?

    Diffa is located in the southeasternmost region of Niger, bordering three countries: Nigeria, with whom it shares a border of 1 500 km, Chad and Cameroon. It has about 600 000 inhabitants. It's a very remote area far from the capital Niamey, quite marginalised and structurally deficient in terms of agricultural production and in terms of basic social services.

    Diffa is considered to suffer a humanitarian crisis. When did the situation become more serious?

    Diffa suffers a combination of two crises. It is a remote area in a country that was already the poorest in the world. At the structural level, the region is very weak in terms of basic services and it experiences extreme vulnerability and extreme poverty.

    In addition, since May 2013 Diffa has been caught up in an acute crisis related to population displacements, originating mostly from Nigeria – a country facing open conflicts for a good ten years with the Boko Haram group plaguing the subregion.

    What is the current situation?

    What is striking in Diffa is the extreme vulnerability and total destitution of those who have just arrived (some just two to three weeks ago) from the shores of Lake Chad. These displacements are different from those in 2014, when the waves of people arriving had (at least some) a little time to put their affairs in order and bring the little they had with them. This time, we see the displacement of entire families arriving with absolutely nothing and having to deal with an extremely hostile and arid environment on arrival. Hence, it is important for the humanitarian response to meet basic needs for those people who arrive in a pretty sorry state.

    What are the most urgent needs?

    In terms of the most urgent humanitarian needs, we are talking about around 30 000 most vulnerable people out of a total of 100 000 displaced persons. There are two main sites which alone accommodate nearly 50 000 people. The daily supply of food and water for the 30 000 people who are 100% dependent on humanitarian aid, are therefore priorities. After water and food, health care and nutrition are very important: partners such as Médecins Sans Frontières and Save the Children found very high levels of malnutrition and related diseases on site which require emergency intervention.

    Globally, there are protection needs due to all risk factors: armed persons all over the place, unaccompanied minors, single women. This necessitates a presence as part of the protective measures to keep these people safe.

    The European Commission's Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection department (ECHO) has been present in Niger for many years, particularly in Diffa. What has been the response since 2013?

    First, since the beginning of the crisis in 2013, we have supported the specific action to strengthen the protection of displaced persons and this includes both the registration of displaced persons by the UN Agency for Refugees (UNHCR) and the provision of shelter and survival kits. Our support has gradually increased. We diversified our partners and directly supported some NGOs, especially Save the Children, with funding for projects to support health and malnutrition in health centres. The support was extended to mobile clinics and mobile strategies beyond health centres, by reaching out to people on travel sites to provide emergency first aid assistance.

    We have also supported the International Committee of the Red Cross which is one of the leading food distributors, especially in areas difficult to access.

    We also strengthened our partnership with the International Rescue Committee which works in particular on aspects of protection, to ensure that violence based on gender and child protection are considered in the programmes. Furthermore, we support the UN World Food Programme to distribute food to 100 000 people.

    In 2015, our funding for Diffa alone amounted to €12.8 million. Assistance has tripled in a year, because of the deterioration of the situation since February 2015. Before this time, violence was concentrated mainly in Nigeria, and Niger only suffered secondary effects.

    The EU Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid, Christos Stylianides, recently announced more funding for Niger. What will these new funds be used for?

    Discussions are currently ongoing with our partners. Our idea is to move forward quickly to ensure the secure monthly distributions of food and nutritional supplements for children under 5. We also want to strengthen water and sanitation services for the displaced and in the camps. There is currently one officially opened camp home to nearly 1 400 people, and a second one which requires an initial investment to provide basic services.

    What struck you most about your mission?

    What struck me most was the level of despair and distress of these populations. Some people have been there only a few days and others for several months, and some are receiving humanitarian aid. But it remains largely insufficient in view of the extent and severity of the needs.

    Many hope to return home but many also know that the situation will last. They are trapped and dependant on foreign aid and the solidarity of local people. Some have been housed within the local community, but this is beginning to give rise to tensions between the already very poor local population and displaced people dependent on external assistance.


    0 0

    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Cameroon, Nigeria

    Principaux defis par secteurs

    WASH

    • Accès à l'eau : standard non atteint (Sècheresse, augmentation rapide de la population entrainant un usage excessif des infrastructures hydrauliques existantes, mauvaise qualité du sol)

    • Assainissement : Le rythme de construction des infrastructures d’assainissement ne suit pas l’augmentation de la population

    • Pénurie de bois sur le marché local pour la construction des latrines/douches

    Réponses

    • UNHCR : Construction en cours de 10 forages dans les villages hôtes autour du camp de Minawao

    • Plan Cameroun, MSF-SUISSE: construction de latrines en cours MSF-SUISSE: construction de 350 latrines


    0 0

    Source: UN Children's Fund
    Country: Mali, Niger, Nigeria

    Highlights:

    · Since May 2013, approximately 100,000 displaced people from Nigeria have found refuge in Diffa region (South East of Niger). In May 2015, for security reasons, the government relocated more than 40,000 people out of the Chad Islands. Among them, approximately 15,000 people were transported to the Nigeria border by the government in coordination with the Nigerian authorities, while more than 25,000 relocated in 3 temporary sites where the government and its partners are providing assistance (including NFIs provided by UNICEF). Registration of the newly displaced people is on-going. Once registered, displaced people from the Chad Islands will be sensitized to be relocated in the refugee or IDPs camps.

    In parallel, UNICEF continues to support displaced people (who found refuge in more than 143 villages) and host communities outside the camps and temporary sites.

    · As of 03 May 2015 (week 18), 97,708 children under five benefited from the integrated treatment for Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM). 11.2% of these cases (10,887) were reported to have severe medical complications and were admitted into intensive care/inpatient facilities while 86,821 children were treated on an outpatient basis.

    · As of 17 May (week 20) and since the beginning of the year, a total of 4,873 suspected measles cases have been registered including 14 deaths, which represent a fatality rate of 0.3%. Zinder region registered 2,805 cases (60 % of the total number of cases registered at national level). UNICEF supported immunization response campaigns in Zinder, Maradi, Tahoua and Agadez regions as well as preventive immunization in Diffa region.

    · As of 27 May 2015, a total of 7,966 meningitis cases have been registered in Niger, including 537 deaths (which represents a fatality rate of 6.7%). Despite the fact that new districts are reaching the epidemic threshold such as Filingué, Illela, Kollo and Ouallam, the weekly number of new meningitis cases is decreasing.

    · Since 2012, the crisis in northern Mali has forced some 50,000 Malians to flee to Niger. UNICEF, in collaboration with UNHCR and partners, continues to provide these refugees with humanitarian assistance.

    · UNICEF Humanitarian response remains underfunded. It may hamper UNICEF capacity to meet the needs of the expected 366,858 severely malnourished children, the 30,000 Malian refugee children in camps and hosting areas and the 85,000 children and women displaced from Nigeria.


    0 0

    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Mali, Mauritania


    0 0

    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Mali, Mauritania

    HIGHLIGHTS

    • Following recent episodes of violence sparking in Northern Mali, a new inflow of 226 Malian refugees was registered in Mauritania since the end of April. The refugees were transferred to Mberra camp and received adequate assistance from UNHCR and its partners.

    • On 12 May, the final version of the Mauritanian draft National Refugee Law was officially adopted by the Commission nationale consultative pour les réfugiés.

    • The six-month verification process of more than 25,000 individuals in Mberra whose nationality was in doubt was successfully completed with the confirmation of Malian nationality for 10,553 refugees and the de-activation of 3,708 people who were found to be Mauritanian nationals. The remainder was referred for further verification.

    • On 19 May, a UNHCR delegation composed of the Director of the Regional Bureau for the Middle-East and North-Africa, the Representative in Mauritania and the Head of the North Africa Desk met with the Mauritanian Head of State and the Prime Minister, reaffirming the existing strong collaboration between UNHCR and the Mauritanian Government in the humanitarian response to the Malian crisis.


    0 0

    Source: International Organization for Migration
    Country: Algeria, Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Libya, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, World

    Par Giuseppe Loprete

    Se rendre en Libye par tous les moyens possibles dans l’espoir de prendre un bateau qui les emmènera vers ce qu’ils croient être l’eldorado européen est le rêve de milliers de migrants venus d’Afrique sub-saharienne.

    La route est longue, semée d’embûches et d’actes de violence pour ces milliers de Nigériens, Gambiens, Sénégalais, Maliens, Burkinabés, Ivoiriens et autres ressortissants africains qui empruntent les couloirs de la mort pour traverser le désert nigérien. En 2013, près d’une centaine de migrants avaient été retrouvés morts de soif sur les dunes de sable du Sahara, parmi eux des femmes et des enfants.

    90% des boat-people en Méditerranée partent de la Libye (les autres de l’Egypte ou encore de la Turquie). A ce jour, plus de 50 000 personnes ont rejoint les côtes européennes. Malheureusement, plus de 1800 ont trouvé la mort, noyés et portés disparus, parce qu’on les avait entassés comme des sardines dans des bateaux de fortune inaptes à prendre la mer.

    Mais nombreux sont ceux qui échouent dans leur voyage, qui rentrent chez eux volontairement ou pas et qui se retrouvent pendant des mois au Niger sans assistance ni ressources pour rentrer dans leur pays d’origine.

    J’ai passé plusieurs mois l’année dernière à Agadès au Niger à les interroger, à leur demander pourquoi ils étaient partis ?, dans quelles conditions ?, comment avaient-ils réussi à survivre ?, comment comptaient-ils rentrer chez eux ? etc Leurs histoires étaient bouleversantes.

    Moi et mes collègues de l’OIM, nous avons recueilli les témoignages de près de 5000 migrants d’Afrique de l’ouest et d’Afrique centrale dans trois centres de transit et d’assistance pour les migrants, à Dirkou au nord-est du Niger, à Arlit au nord-ouest et à Agadez, le plus grand centre de passage pour les migrants qui partent dans le désert dans l’espoir de rejoindre la Libye ou encore l’Algérie.

    Le migrant, qui rentre, volontairement ou non, de ces pays et se retrouve au Niger, est en général un jeune homme entre 15 et 35 ans. Il est souvent marié. De quatre et sept personnes dépendent de ses revenus pour survivre dans son pays d’origine. Au cours de son périple, il a fait face à de nombreuses difficultés : des abus physiques, des menaces d’intervention auprès des autorités, des vols et confiscation de documents d’identité par son employeur ou encore la prise forcée de drogue et autres substances, etc.

    Il a passé au moins un an en Libye ou en Algérie où il a vécu d’emplois journaliers temporaires, principalement dans le domaine du bâtiment, mais aussi de mendicité. Il a été docker sur les ports de Tripoli ou de Misrata en Libye. Il a été reconduit aux frontières par les autorités ou est reparti volontairement parce que la vie était trop dure, ou encore parce que la Libye est devenu un pays trop dangereux où règne l’anarchie. Il se retrouve dans un centre de transit de l’OIM au Niger, piégé entre le pays de destination où il n’a pas pu rester et son pays d’origine qu’il a quitté dans l’espoir d’une vie meilleure. Son rêve ? Rentrer chez lui maintenant et se lancer dans des activités agricoles ou lancer un petit commerce.

    Mais, ce n’est pas si simple…

    Les migrants quittent un pays pauvre parce qu’il n’y a pas d’avenir pour eux et leur famille. Ils savent que le retour ne sera pas facile. Ils arrivent au Niger sans un sous en poche. La très grande majorité des migrants interrogés ne savent que répondre quand on leur demande ce qu’ils vont faire une fois de retour chez eux. Certains disent qu’ils devront emprunter de l’argent.

    L’OIM accueille ces migrants dans les centres de transit et leur fourni un hébergement temporaire, de la nourriture, des soins médicaux, du soutien psychologique, des articles non alimentaire de base et fait en sorte que leur retour dans les pays d’origine se fasse dans la dignité et que leur protection et leur sécurité soient assurées.

    L’OIM peut dans certains cas fournir une aide financière afin de permettre aux migrants d’exploiter de nouvelles opportunités une fois de retour chez eux. Mais ce n’est malheureusement pas systématique et dépend entièrement de la disponibilité des fonds fournis par les pays donateurs.

    Non seulement, les donateurs doivent délier les cordons de leur bourse pour aider ces migrants de retour chez eux - ne serait-ce que pour que la pauvreté, la faim et la misère de ne les poussent pas à nouveau sur la route des couloirs de la mort - mais il faut aussi faire davantage pour informer les migrants. La grande majorité de ceux interrogés n’avaient aucune idée des difficultés qui les attendaient ! Il est urgent de mettre sur pied une grande campagne d’information pour ces personnes désespérées, dans leurs pays d’origine et de transit, sur les dangers qu’elles encourent. Grâce au soutien financier de l’Union européenne, l’OIM a un tel programme au Niger. Mais de tels efforts doivent être multipliés ailleurs, dans d’autres pays d’origine, pour qu’il n’y ait plus d’hécatombe en Méditerranée.


    0 0

    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cabo Verde, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Togo

    L'Afrique de l’Ouest peut être divisée en trois zones agro-écologiques ou en trois bassins commerciaux (bassins de l’ouest, bassin du centre, bassin de l’est). Les deux sont importants pour l'interprétation du comportement et de la dynamique du marché.

    Les trois principales zones agro-écologiques incluent la zone Sahélienne, la zone Soudanaise et la zone Côtière où la production et la consommation peuvent être facilement classifiées. (1) Dans la zone Sahélienne, le mil constitue le principal produit alimentaire cultivé et consommé en particulier dans les zones rurales et de plus en plus par certaines populations qui y ont accès en milieux urbains. Des exceptions sont faites pour le Cap Vert où le maïs et le riz sont les produits les plus importants, la Mauritanie où le blé et le sorgho et le Sénégal où le riz constituent des aliments de base. Les principaux produits de substitution dans le Sahel sont le sorgho, le riz, et la farine de manioc (Gari), avec les deux derniers en période de crise. (2) Dans la zone Soudanienne (le sud du Tchad, le centre du Nigéria, du Bénin, du Ghana, du Togo, de la Côte d'Ivoire, le sud du Burkina Faso, du Mali, du Sénégal, la Guinée Bissau, la Serra Leone, le Libéria) le maïs et le sorgho constituent les principales céréales consommées par la majorité de la population. Suivent après le riz et les tubercules particulièrement le manioc et l’igname. (3) Dans la zone côtière, avec deux saisons de pluie, l’igname et le maïs constituent les principaux produits alimentaires. Ils sont complétés par le niébé, qui est une source très significative de protéines.

    Les trois bassins commerciaux sont simplement connus sous les noms de bassin Ouest, Centre, et Est. En plus du mouvement du sud vers le nord des produits, les flux de certaines céréales se font aussi horizontalement. (1) Le bassin Ouest comprend la Mauritanie, le Sénégal, l’ouest du Mali, la Sierra Leone, la Guinée, le Libéria, et la Gambie où le riz est le plus commercialisé. (2)
    Le bassin central se compose de la Côte d'Ivoire, le centre et l’est du Mali, le Burkina Faso, le Ghana, et le Togo où le maïs est généralement commercialisé. (3) Le bassin Est se rapporte au Niger, Nigéria, Tchad, et Bénin où le millet est le plus fréquemment commercialisé. Ces trois bassins commerciaux sont distingués sur la carte ci-dessus.


    0 0

    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees
    Country: Mali, Mauritania


    0 0

    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Mali

    6/9/2015 - 05:00 GMT

    by Michel MOUTOT

    Only the poor, old and sick have stuck around, holed up at home, trembling at the slightest noise, in the once-thriving Malian settlement of Bintagoungou, now little more than a ghost town.

    The village to the west of Timbuktu in the country's restive north has been attacked three times in recent months by hordes of armed men who have killed and looted before shrinking back into their desert hideouts.

    Those with the means have paid the 100,000-CFA franc ($170, 152-euro) fare to hang out the back of an overloaded truck to safety in the town of Goundam, 40 kilometres (25 miles) further south.

    The only authority left in the desolate village is the ailing traditional chieftain, Hamad Mamadou.

    Blind and walking with difficulty, he needs an interpreter to speak to the Malian captain and two French officers who have come to spend a few hours in Bintagoungou.

    "Almost everyone has fled because of fear. We never sleep, day or night. At the slightest vehicle approaching, we hide in our houses," he tells the soldiers as they sit together under a canopy.

    "Staying here is very dangerous. Especially today, market day. This is often when they come. Now they will not dare, because you are here.

    "But when you leave it will be worse. The bandits will come to find out what you said, what your plans are."

    • 'No security' -

    Mamadou says he has no idea who these "bandits" are.

    "They come from the Sahara in the night in Toyotas. They have weapons, scarves cover their faces. Those who dare to look see only their eyes," he says.

    At midday, under an unforgiving desert sun, sand and litter blows across deserted streets. The local school is closed and the health clinic shuttered.

    On Thursdays it was once a challenge to push through the crowds to get to the other side of the market square, but now most of the stalls are empty.

    "There is no security, day or night," butcher Assibit Yattara tells AFP as he dices pieces of goat meat.

    "As soon as I have got together enough money, I'm taking my family away from here."

    Living as a refugee in Goundam, Bintagoungou mayor Hama Abacrine has a clear idea of the identity of the assailants.

    "They are not foreigners. They are Malians -- Arabs, Tuareg," he says.

    "There are even blacks among them. We know them, some were our neighbours. They are thieves, robbers. Banditry has no ethnicity."

    Abacrine fled three weeks ago, convinced that staying would have cost him his life.

    "It's simple -- the land was abandoned to thieves. This is why two-thirds of my constituents are here," he tells AFP.

    • 'Worse than the terrorists' -

    "If you fight against them, 100 of them come back and burn everything. They steal money, vehicles, stores, equipment.

    "As a result, people say they miss the days when Bintagoungou was, like the whole region, in the hands of the Islamists, because they kept order and stopped theft. For the people, thieves are worse than terrorists."

    Northern Mali -- a vast swathe of desert around the size of France -- was seized by jihadist groups linked to Al-Qaeda for around 10 months in 2012.

    They were ousted by a French-led military intervention launched in January 2013, but large areas of the north remain beyond the control of the Malian authorities.

    Aminatou Bourri, 34, also fled Bintagoungou to seek refuge with her children in Goundam, where she is originally from.

    "I would have made the journey on foot if I'd had to. The rebels, terrorists, thieves, Tuareg -- I do not know exactly who they are -- they take everything: food, animals, children's clothes.

    "I'm lucky -- my family is here. There are people here who have no one, camped near the Niger river."

    Bintagoungou was attacked on April 30, half an hour after the Malian army left, according to the mayor.

    "We need the army back. After two weeks, thieves will have understood, and will have gone to attack somewhere else."

    Captain Sheikh Bayala, who has just been appointed to Goundam, watches the mayor uneasily, then looks at his feet, making no promises.

    mm/ft/jm/erf

    © 1994-2015 Agence France-Presse


    0 0

    Source: European Commission Humanitarian Aid department
    Country: Niger, Nigeria

    C’est l’une des régions les plus pauvres du monde : Diffa, une ville du Sud-est du Niger qui abrite une population d’une extrême vulnérabilité. Depuis 2013, des vagues de réfugiés ayant fui la violence de Boko Haram au Nigeria voisin ont exacerbé cette situation déjà critique.

    Jean de Lestrange, expert humanitaire de la Commission européenne, vient d’y effectuer une visite pour évaluer les besoins et la réponse de la Commission européenne. L'agent d'information régional pour l'Afrique de l'Ouest, Isabel Coello, a parlé avec lui dès son retour.

    Q : Où se situe exactement Diffa et quelles sont ses caractéristiques principales ?

    R : Diffa se situe à l’extrême Sud-Est du Niger, à la frontière entre 3 pays : le Nigéria, avec qui elle partage une frontière de 1 500 km, le Tchad et le Cameroun. Elle compte environ 600 000 habitants. C’est une région très éloignée de la capitale, Niamey, assez marginalisée et structurellement déficitaire en termes de production agricole et en termes de services sociaux de base.

    Q : On parle de crise humanitaire à Diffa. Depuis quand la situation est-elle devenue encore plus critique ?

    R : Diffa est une combinaison de deux crises : c’est une région reculée dans un pays qui est déjà le plus pauvre du monde, donc déjà au niveau structurel, cette région souffre de beaucoup de maux en termes de services de base, en termes d’extrême vulnérabilité et d’extrême pauvreté des populations.

    En plus s’est rajoutée à Diffa depuis Mai 2013, une crise aigüe liée à des déplacements de populations, qui sont venues en majorité du Nigéria, pays qui fait face à des conflits ouverts depuis une bonne dizaine d’années avec le groupe Boko Haram qui sévit dans la sous-région.

    Q : Quelle est la situation actuelle ?

    R : Ce qui frappe à Diffa, c’est l’extrême vulnérabilité et la désuétude totale de ces populations qui viennent d’arriver pour certains depuis seulement deux à trois semaines des rives du lac Tchad. Ce sont des déplacements différents de ce qu’on a pu voir en 2014, avec des vagues de déplacements de personnes qui ont eu au moins le temps, pour certains, de faire leurs affaires et d’amener le peu qu’ils avaient avec eux. Cette fois-ci, on a des situations de déplacement avec des familles entières qui arrivent absolument avec rien et qui doivent composer avec un environnement extrêmement hostile et aride sur place, d’où l’importance de la réponse humanitaire pour subvenir aux besoins de base pour ces gens qui arrivent dans un état assez déplorable.

    Q : Quels sont les besoins les plus urgents ?

    R : Pour les besoins les plus urgents, on parle d’environ 30 000 personnes sur une population déplacée en tout qui dépasse les 100 000 personnes. Il y’a notamment deux sites principaux qui concentrent à eux-seuls presque 50 000 personnes. L’approvisionnement en eau et en nourriture au jour le jour, pour ces 30 000 personnes qui dépendent à 100% de l’aide humanitaire, sont donc prioritaires. Après l’eau et les vivres, les soins en santé et en nutrition sont très importants : des partenaires comme Médecins Sans Frontières et Save The Children ont constaté des taux de malnutrition très élevés ainsi que des maladies associées sur le site, nécessitant donc une intervention d’urgence.

    Et globalement, il y’a des besoins de protection, avec tous les facteurs de risque réunis : porteurs d’armes un peu partout, mineurs non accompagnés, femmes seules ; ce qui nécessite une présence également sur ce volet protection pour sécuriser ces personnes.

    Q : Le service de la Commission européenne à l’aide humanitaire et à la protection civile (ECHO) est présent au Niger depuis des années. Quelle a été la réponse à Diffa depuis 2013 ?

    R : D’abord, nous avons soutenu depuis le début de la crise de 2013, une action spécifique visant à renforcer la protection des personnes déplacées et qui contient à la fois l’enregistrement des personnes déplacées par le Haut-Commissariat des Nations-Unies pour les Réfugiés (HCR) et la fourniture d’abris et de kits essentiels. On a progressivement augmenté notre soutien, notamment en diversifiant nos partenaires et en appuyant directement plusieurs ONG, en particulier Save the Children, avec le financement d’un projet régulier d’appui à la santé et à la malnutrition, dans les centres de santé. On a étendu ce soutien à l’appui en cliniques mobiles, stratégies foraines, au-delà des centres de santé, en allant vers les populations sur les sites de déplacement, pour apporter une assistance d’urgence pour les premiers soins.

    Nous appuyons aussi le Comité International de la Croix Rouge qui est un des acteurs principaux de distribution de vivres en particulier dans les zones difficiles d’accès.

    Nous avons également consolidé notre partenariat avec International Rescue Committee (IRC) qui est une ONG qui travaille notamment sur les aspects de protection, pour s’assurer que les violences basées sur le genre par exemple et que les considérations liées à la protection de l’enfance sont prises en considération dans les programmes. En outre, nous appuyons le Programme Alimentaire Mondiale pour distribuer des vivres aux 100 000 personnes.

    En 2015, notre allocation pour Diffa uniquement s’élève à €12.8 millions. C’est une assistance qui a triplé en une année, au regard de la détérioration de la situation depuis février 2015, date à laquelle le conflit a directement touché le Niger, car avant, il était surtout concentré au Nigéria et l’on ne subissait que les effets secondaires.

    Q : Le commissaire européen chargé de l’aide humanitaire, Christos Stylianides, a récemment annoncé plus de fonds pour le Niger. A quoi ces nouveaux financements vont-ils servir ?

    R : On a des discussions en cours avec nos partenaires et l’idée en effet est de rapidement avancer pour être certain de sécuriser les distributions mensuelles de vivres et les compléments nutritionnels pour les enfants de moins de 5 ans. On souhaite également renforcer les aspects Eau et Assainissement à la fois sur les sites de déplacés et dans les camps, puisqu’actuellement, il y a un camp officiellement ouvert qui accueille près de 1 400 personnes et un deuxième qui est en cours d’ouverture et qui nécessite un investissement initial pour apporter les services de base.

    Q : Qu’est-ce qui vous a frappé le plus dans cette mission ?

    R : Ce qui m’a frappé le plus est le niveau de désespoir et de détresse de ces populations. Certaines d’entre elles sont là, depuis quelques jours seulement et d’autres depuis plusieurs mois et bénéficient pour une partie d’entre elles, de l’aide humanitaire. Mais celle-ci reste largement insuffisante au regard de l’ampleur et de la sévérité des besoins.

    Beaucoup ont l’espoir de rentrer chez eux mais beaucoup savent également que la situation va durer, qu’ils sont un peu piégés, dépendant de l’aide extérieure, mais aussi de la solidarité des populations locales. Ils avaient été hébergées, pour certains, au sein de cette population locale, mais la durée de cette période commence à faire naître des tensions entre ces populations locales déjà très pauvres et des populations déplacées qui dépendent de l’assistance extérieure.


    0 0

    Source: International Organization for Migration
    Country: Mali

    Mali - De nouveaux affrontements au nord du Mali entre les forces du gouvernement malien (FAMA), la Milice GATIA et la Coordination du mouvement d’Azawad (CMA) ont déplacé quelque 59 000 personnes dans les régions de Tombouctou, de Gao et de Mopti.

    En collaboration avec le gouvernement malien, l’OIM recueille et analyse les données sur les déplacés internes pour mieux répondre à leurs besoins.

    Le dernier rapport de la Matrice de suivi des déplacements (DTM) de l’OIM publié le 2 juin montre que 59 245 personnes ont été déplacées par les nouveaux affrontements, dont 53 100 dans la région de Tombouctou, 4 062 à Gao et 2 083 à Mopti.

    Bon nombre de ceux qui ont échappé à la violence ont besoin d’aide de première nécessité, notamment de nourriture, d’eau et d’abris, ainsi que d’un soutien psychosocial. L’OIM lance un appel de 5 millions de dollars pour les aider.

    La plupart vivent actuellement dans des communautés d’accueil ou des centres collectifs, notamment des écoles, tandis que d’autres ont trouvé refuge dans des endroits plus sûrs dans les régions voisines. D’après les autorités locales à Ansongo, tous les déplacés internes ont urgemment besoin de nourriture, de couvertures et de tentes.

    Les équipes de protection de l’OIM aident déjà les déplacés en leur fournissant une aide médicale, un abri, de l’eau, de l’assainissement et un transport. Elle a également mis en place un système de renvoi au sein de la communauté humanitaire en vue transférer les personnes vulnérables vers des organismes spécialisés capables de prendre en charge leurs besoins spécifiques.

    L’année dernière l’OIM espérait la fin du déplacement interne au Mali en 2015. La plupart des déplacés internes (394 655), qui ont fui le nord du Mali suite à la violence en 2012, étaient retournés à Tombouctou, à Gao, à Mopti et à Kidal à la fin mai 2014.

    Au 31 mai 2015, ce nombre est passé à 411 000. Mais 100 000 personnes restent déplacées à l’intérieur du pays, dont 43 000 depuis la crise de 2012 et 59 000 en raison du conflit actuel.

    « Si la situation actuelle en matière de sécurité dans le nord du pays ne s’améliore pas, 2015 ne verra probablement pas la fin du déplacement interne au Mali », confie Bakary Doumbia, chef de mission de l’OIM au Mali. « Ces affrontements font croître la vulnérabilité des civils, qui ont besoin de protection et d’autres types d’aide humanitaire. »

    Pour plus d’informations, veuillez contacter Aida Kaspar, OIM Mali, Tel.: +223 90 50 05 05, Email: aguissekaspar@iom.int


    0 0

    Source: Assessment Capacities Project
    Country: Afghanistan, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Haiti, India, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kiribati, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, Uganda, Ukraine, Vanuatu, World, Yemen

    Snapshot 3-9 June 2015

    Yemen: 20 million people, close to 80% of the population, are estimated to need humanitarian aid. 500,000 people were displaced in May, bringing the total displaced since 26 March to more than 1 million. The escalation in the conflict has meant two million more people are food insecure, and six million more lack access to healthcare, and 9.4 million lack access to safe water.

    Nigeria: The situation in the northeast is destabilising further. Boko Haram attacks killed more than 66 people over 4–7 June. Populations in parts of Yobe, Borno, and Adamawa states are expected to face Emergency food insecurity between July and September.

    Sudan: In South Kordofan, 26,000 people were displaced by violence in May. Increased violence in South Sudan has brought 13,000 new refugees to White Nile and South Kordofan since the end of May. In Darfur, some 100,000 people are thought to have been displaced since the beginning of the year, but they cannot be reached and numbers cannot be confirmed.

    Go to www.geo.acaps.org for analysis of more than 40 humanitarian crises.

    Updated: 09/06/2015 Next Update: 16/06/2015

    Global Emergency Overview Web Interface


    0 0

    Source: Government of Japan, International Organization for Migration, US Agency for International Development, Government of the Republic of Mali
    Country: Mali

    Introduction

    La Direction Nationale du Développement social (DNDS), en tant que structure centrale du Ministère de la Solidarité, de l’Action Humanitaire et de la Reconstruction du Nord (MSAHRN), conformément aux principes directeurs relatifs aux personnes déplacées, reconnait l’importance d’obtenir des données précises afin de guider la réponse humanitaire et de faciliter le retour et la réintégration des personnes déplacées internes (PDIs). Forte de son expérience en matière d’assistance, de protection, de secours et de défense des droits des personnes affectées par les crises migratoires, la DNDS s’est positionnée comme un acteur majeur au Mali. En charge du programme Matrice de Suivi des Déplacements: (Displacement Tracking Matrix, DTM en anglais), la DNDS fournit depuis décembre 2014 des informations à l’ensemble de la communauté humanitaire afin de répondre aux besoins des populations déplacées dans notre pays.

    L’objectif du programme DTM est de collecter des données actualisées sur les mouvements de populations générés par le conflit. Les évaluations menées dans le cadre de ce programme permettent de collecter des données concernant les populations déplacées et retournées ainsi que des informations concernant les zones de retour dans les régions nord.

    La méthodologie et les outils utilisés par le programme DTM ont été élaborés par la Commission Mouvement de Populations (CMP), groupe de travail du cluster protection.

    Les équipes DTM sont présentes dans l’ensemble des régions du Mali et sont composées d’agent du Ministère de la Solidarité, de l’Action Humanitaire et de la Reconstruction du Nord (MSAHRN).

    Le programme DTM reçoit le soutien financier de l’Organisation Internationale pour les Migrations (OIM) à travers ses partenaires (Japon, USAID/OFDA).


    0 0

    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Central African Republic, Ghana, Guinea, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Sierra Leone

    CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC
    NGOS SUSPEND OPERATIONS OVER INSECURITY

    Several NGOs have temporarily suspended operations in the areas along Baboua-Besson and Baboua-Cantonnier roads in the western Nana Mambéré prefecture due to persistent insecurity posed by armed attackers. Movement on the Bouar-Cantonnier axis remains restricted. As a result of the insecurity, much of Nana Mambéré risks becoming inaccessible to humanitarian actors. A polio vaccination of over 16,000 children has stalled in two Nana Mambéré sub- prefectures, where the monitoring of population movement, protection assistance and delivery of relief items are impossible.

    GHANA
    150 KILLED BY BLAST, FLOODING

    On 3 June, around 150 people were killed by an explosion at a petrol station in the capital Accra during torrential rains and heavy flooding that also caused deaths. The exact cause of the blast is yet to be ascertained, although some reports indicate that a fuel leak from the station mixed with flood waters and was ignited by fire in nearby houses. The flooding has affected a total of 9,255 people in the wider Accra region. The government announced that it would release US$ 14 million to help the victims.

    MALI
    20,500 CHILDREN OUT OF SCHOOL DUE TO VIOLENCE

    The recent outbreak of violence in northern Mali has forced the closure of over 100 more schools, bringing to a total of 430 schools closed since January and 20,500 children deprived of education. The organisation of final examinations has also been disrupted for more than 1,300 students in Gao, Timbuktu, and Mopti regions as many examination centres are in insecure areas, posing protection concerns. Some 59,000 people have been displaced by the fighting involving government forces and armed groups. The total number of IDPs in Mali now stands at just over 100,000, mainly in the restive north.

    MAURITANIA
    AID GROUPS APPEAL FOR FUNDING

    With Mauritania’s US$ 105 million SRP for 2015 so far funded at only 21 percent, UNHCR and World Food programme warned on 4 June that lack of adequate funding is threatening assistance to Malian refugees in the country. UNHCR and WFP have this year respectively received US$ 3.2 million and US$ 5.9 million, but still need US$ five million and US$ 3.9 million respectively to continue assisting the refugees over the next six months. Funding shortfalls prompted WFP to temporarily suspend distributions in March. It has now reduced rations for June - September and without additional funds, the distributions may come to a halt in October. Nearly 300 new arrivals from Mali have been registered in Mauritania since late April due to a flare up of fighting in northern Mali.

    NIGER
    MENINGITIS OUTBREAK EBBS

    The meningitis outbreak that has killed 546 people and infected 8,259 others since January has peaked, the government and World Health Organization announced on 1 June. The outbreak peaked in the first week of May with 2,189 cases and 132 deaths reported. It began declining in the week of 11 - 17 May and continued to the last week of the month when 264 cases and eight deaths were recorded.

    EVD GUINEA/SIERRA LEONE
    19 NEW CASES REPORTED

    From 4 - 7 June, Guinea reported seven new cases in the hotspot prefectures of Boké, Dubréka and Forécariah. Sierra Leone, meanwhile, recorded 12 cases in the five days to 7 June. Boké, Dubréka, Forécariah and Fria prefectures are currently the four EVD-active areas in Guinea, while in Sierra Leone, Ebola is now down to just three districts: in the capital, (Western Area Urban), Kambia, (near the border with Guinea) and in Port Loko.


    0 0

    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Central African Republic, Ghana, Guinea, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Sierra Leone

    RÉPUBLIQUE CENTRAFRICAINE
    DES ONGs SUSPENDENT LEURS OPÉRATIONS FACE À L’INSÉCURITÉ

    Plusieurs ONGs ont temporairement suspendu leurs opérations dans les zones le long des routes de Baboua-Besson et Baboua-cantonnier dans la préfecture de Nana Mambéré à l'ouest, en raison de l'insécurité persistante. Les mouvements sur l'axe Bouar-Cantonnier restent restreints. En raison de l'insécurité, une grande partie de Nana Mambéré risque de devenir inaccessible aux acteurs humanitaires. Une campagne de vaccination contre la polio de plus de 16 000 enfants n’a pas pu avoir lieu dans deux sous-préfectures de Nana Mambéré, où le suivi des mouvements de population, la protection et la livraison d'articles de secours sont impossibles.

    GHANA
    150 TUÉS PAR UNE EXPLOSION ET DES INONDATIONS

    Le 3 juin, environ 150 personnes ont été tuées par une explosion dans une station d'essence dans la capitale Accra lors de pluies torrentielles et de fortes inondations qui ont également fait des morts. La cause exacte de l'explosion est encore à établir, bien que certains rapports indiquent qu'une fuite de carburant mélangée aux eaux de crue aurait été enflammée par le feu de maisons voisines. Les inondations ont touché un total de 9 255 personnes dans la grande région d’Accra. Le gouvernement a annoncé qu'il allait débloquer US$14 millions pour aider les victimes.

    MALI
    20 500 ENFANTS PRIVÉS D'ÉCOLE EN RAISON DE LA VIOLENCE

    La récente flambée de violence dans le nord du Mali a forcé la fermeture de plus de 100 écoles, soit un total de 430 écoles fermées depuis janvier et 20 500 enfants privés d'éducation. L'organisation des examens de fin d’année a également été perturbée pour plus de 1 300 étudiants dans les régions de Gao, Tombouctou et Mopti car plusieurs centres d'examen sont dans des zones dangereuses, ce qui pose des problèmes de protection. Quelques 59 000 personnes ont été déplacées suite aux combats opposant des groupes armés. Le nombre total de personnes déplacées au Mali se situe maintenant à un peu plus de 100 000, principalement dans le nord.

    MAURITANIE
    APPELS DE FONDS DES GROUPES D’AIDE

    Le Plan de Réponse Stratégique 2015 de US$105 millions pour la Mauritanie a été financé à seulement 21 pour cent au 29 mai. Le 4 juin, le HCR et le Programme alimentaire mondial ont averti que le manque de financement menaçait l'assistance aux réfugiés maliens en Mauritanie. Le HCR et le PAM ont respectivement reçu cette année US$ 3,2 et US$ 5,9 millions mais ont encore besoin de US$ 5 et US$ 3,9 millions respectivement, pour continuer à aider les réfugiés pour les six prochains mois. Le manque de financement a conduit le PAM à suspendre temporairement les distributions en Mars. Ils ont maintenant réduit les rations pour juin - septembre et sans fonds supplémentaires, les distributions s’arrêteraient en Octobre. Près de 300 nouveaux arrivants en provenance du Mali ont été enregistrés en Mauritanie depuis la fin Avril en raison d'une poussée des combats dans le nord du Mali.

    NIGER
    BAISSE DE L’ÉPIDÉMIE DE MENINGITE

    Le gouvernement nigérien et l'Organisation mondiale de la santé ont annoncé le 1er Juin que l'épidémie de méningite qui a tué 546 personnes et infecté 8259 autres depuis janvier a atteint son pic. L'épidémie a culminé dans la première semaine de mai, avec 2189 cas et 132 décès signalés. Elle a commencé à décliner dans la semaine du 11 au 17 mai et a continué avec 264 cas et huit décès enregistrés dans la dernière semaine de mai.

    MALADIE A VIRUS EBOLA (MVE) GUINÉE/ SIERRA LEONE
    19 NOUVEAUX CAS SIGNALÉS

    Du 4 au 7 juin, la Guinée a signalé sept nouveaux cas dans les préfectures de Boké, Dubréka et Forécariah. La Sierra Leone, quant à elle, a enregistré 12 cas dans les cinq jours menant au 7 juin. Les préfectures de Boké, Dubréka, Forécariah et Fria sont actuellement les quatre zones MVE actives en Guinée; tandis qu’en Sierra Leone, le virus Ebola est maintenant réduit à seulement trois districts: dans la capitale (zone urbaine de l’Ouest), Kambia (près de la frontière guinéenne) et Port Loko.


    0 0

    Source: International Organization for Migration, Government of the Republic of Mali
    Country: Mali

    Dans le cadre de son programme matrice de suivi des déplacements et suite aux différents affrontements qui ont eu lieu récemment dans les régions nord du Mali, la Direction Nationale du Développement Sociale (DNDS) en collaboration avec l’Organisation Internationale pour les Migrations (OIM) continue de mener des évaluations concernant les mouvements de populations. Ce rapport vise à donner, pour la majorité des zones affectées par les récents conflits, des informations concernant les populations déplacées suite aux évènements des dernières semaines.


    0 0

    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Central African Republic, Ghana, Guinea, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Sierra Leone

    RÉPUBLIQUE CENTRAFRICAINE
    DES ONGs SUSPENDENT LEURS OPÉRATIONS FACE À L’INSÉCURITÉ

    Plusieurs ONGs ont temporairement suspendu leurs opérations dans les zones le long des routes de Baboua-Besson et Baboua-cantonnier dans la préfecture de Nana Mambéré à l'ouest, en raison de l'insécurité persistante. Les mouvements sur l'axe Bouar-Cantonnier restent restreints. En raison de l'insécurité, une grande partie de Nana Mambéré risque de devenir inaccessible aux acteurs humanitaires. Une campagne de vaccination contre la polio de plus de 16 000 enfants n’a pas pu avoir lieu dans deux sous-préfectures de Nana Mambéré, où le suivi des mouvements de population, la protection et la livraison d'articles de secours sont impossibles.

    GHANA
    150 TUÉS PAR UNE EXPLOSION ET DES INONDATIONS

    Le 3 juin, environ 150 personnes ont été tuées par une explosion dans une station d'essence dans la capitale Accra lors de pluies torrentielles et de fortes inondations qui ont également fait des morts. La cause exacte de l'explosion est encore à établir, bien que certains rapports indiquent qu'une fuite de carburant mélangée aux eaux de crue aurait été enflammée par le feu de maisons voisines. Les inondations ont touché un total de 9 255 personnes dans la grande région d’Accra. Le gouvernement a annoncé qu'il allait débloquer US$14 millions pour aider les victimes.

    MALI
    20 500 ENFANTS PRIVÉS D'ÉCOLE EN RAISON DE LA VIOLENCE

    La récente flambée de violence dans le nord du Mali a forcé la fermeture de plus de 100 écoles, soit un total de 430 écoles fermées depuis janvier et 20 500 enfants privés d'éducation. L'organisation des examens de fin d’année a également été perturbée pour plus de 1 300 étudiants dans les régions de Gao, Tombouctou et Mopti car plusieurs centres d'examen sont dans des zones dangereuses, ce qui pose des problèmes de protection. Quelques 59 000 personnes ont été déplacées suite aux combats opposant des groupes armés. Le nombre total de personnes déplacées au Mali se situe maintenant à un peu plus de 100 000, principalement dans le nord.

    MAURITANIE
    APPELS DE FONDS DES GROUPES D’AIDE

    Le Plan de Réponse Stratégique 2015 de US$105 millions pour la Mauritanie a été financé à seulement 21 pour cent au 29 mai. Le 4 juin, le HCR et le Programme alimentaire mondial ont averti que le manque de financement menaçait l'assistance aux réfugiés maliens en Mauritanie. Le HCR et le PAM ont respectivement reçu cette année US$ 3,2 et US$ 5,9 millions mais ont encore besoin de US$ 5 et US$ 3,9 millions respectivement, pour continuer à aider les réfugiés pour les six prochains mois. Le manque de financement a conduit le PAM à suspendre temporairement les distributions en Mars. Ils ont maintenant réduit les rations pour juin - septembre et sans fonds supplémentaires, les distributions s’arrêteraient en Octobre. Près de 300 nouveaux arrivants en provenance du Mali ont été enregistrés en Mauritanie depuis la fin Avril en raison d'une poussée des combats dans le nord du Mali.

    NIGER
    BAISSE DE L’ÉPIDÉMIE DE MENINGITE

    Le gouvernement nigérien et l'Organisation mondiale de la santé ont annoncé le 1er Juin que l'épidémie de méningite qui a tué 546 personnes et infecté 8259 autres depuis janvier a atteint son pic. L'épidémie a culminé dans la première semaine de mai, avec 2189 cas et 132 décès signalés. Elle a commencé à décliner dans la semaine du 11 au 17 mai et a continué avec 264 cas et huit décès enregistrés dans la dernière semaine de mai.

    MALADIE A VIRUS EBOLA (MVE) GUINÉE/ SIERRA LEONE
    19 NOUVEAUX CAS SIGNALÉS

    Du 4 au 7 juin, la Guinée a signalé sept nouveaux cas dans les préfectures de Boké, Dubréka et Forécariah. La Sierra Leone, quant à elle, a enregistré 12 cas dans les cinq jours menant au 7 juin. Les préfectures de Boké, Dubréka, Forécariah et Fria sont actuellement les quatre zones MVE actives en Guinée; tandis qu’en Sierra Leone, le virus Ebola est maintenant réduit à seulement trois districts: dans la capitale (zone urbaine de l’Ouest), Kambia (près de la frontière guinéenne) et Port Loko.


    0 0

    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Nigeria

    Kano, Nigeria | AFP | Tuesday 6/9/2015 - 17:25 GMT

    Fifteen people were killed when Boko Haram attacked a remote village in northeast Nigeria, opening fire and burning homes to the ground, three residents told AFP on Tuesday.

    The attack happened at about 2:00 pm (1300 GMT) on Monday in Huyum, in the Askira-Uba district of Borno state which locals say has been hit repeatedly in recent weeks by the Islamist militants.

    "The whole village was burnt by Boko Haram gunmen. We lost around 500 homes," said Bukar Zira, who fled to the commercial hub of Mubi in neighbouring Adamawa state as the rebels moved in.

    Zira said the insurgents surrounded the village and opened fire before moving in, sprinkling petrol on homes, many of which are mud-brick with straw roofs, then setting them alight.

    "We have so far lost 15 people and one was injured. People in the whole village moved out to different parts of Borno and Adamawa," he added.

    Another resident, Peter Malgwui, said Boko Haram had mounted several raids against neighbouring villages in recent weeks, looting food supplies and homes.

    "They completely burnt the whole village. Not a single home has been spared," he added, giving the same death toll as Zira.

    The attack is the 12th since Muhammadu Buhari became Nigeria's new president on May 29. A total of 109 people have been killed, according to AFP reporting.

    Buhari, a former military ruler and retired army general, has made crushing Boko Haram a priority for his administration after six years of violence and at least 15,000 deaths.

    There have been reported military gains in recent months by a coalition of troops from Nigeria, Niger, Chad and Cameroon but continued attacks underscores the ongoing threat from the rebels.

    One Huyum resident, Ishaya Ayuba, said: "The attackers remained up to 4:00 am this morning until they withdrew.

    "There were troops stationed about 20 kilometres (13 miles) away but they didn't respond. We have lost everything."

    abu-phz/mbx/gj

    © 1994-2015 Agence France-Presse


older | 1 | .... | 378 | 379 | (Page 380) | 381 | 382 | .... | 728 | newer