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    Source: UN Human Rights Council
    Country: Guinea, Haiti, Iraq, Libya, Mali, World

    AFTERNOON

    27 March 2015

    Extends Mandate on Mali, Adopts Texts on Libya, Iraq, Guinea and Haiti, on Prevention of Genocide, and on Violence on the Basis of Religion, and Elects Four Mandate Holders

    The Human Rights Council this afternoon closed its twenty-eighth session after it adopted eight texts, including on extending the mandate of the Independent Expert on Mali, on combatting intolerance, negative stereotyping and stigmatization of persons based on religion or belief, on the prevention of genocide, and on the impact of the world drug problem on the enjoyment of human rights. The Human Rights Council also elected four mandate holders.

    Other adopted texts pertained to technical assistance and capacity-building in Libya, Iraq, Guinea, and Haiti.

    In a resolution on combatting intolerance, negative stereotyping and stigmatization of, and discrimination, incitement to violence and violence against, persons based on religion or belief, the Council called upon States to take effective measures to combat discrimination on the basis of religion or belief, to promote religious pluralism, to counter religious profiling and to protect places of worship and religious sites. The resolution requested the High Commissioner to prepare a comprehensive follow-up report with elaborated conclusions and potential follow-up measures on this issue.

    In a resolution on the prevention of genocide, the Council recommended that the General Assembly designate 9 December as the International Day of Commemoration and Dignity of the Victims of Genocide, invited the Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide to continue providing States with guidance, assistance and follow-up and requested the Secretary-General to draw up a roster of focal points and networks on the prevention of genocide with updated information from Member States.

    The Council condemned in the strongest possible terms continued, widespread and grave abuses by Da’esh and urged the Iraqi Government to investigate all alleged abuses and violations of human rights and international humanitarian law. In a resolution on technical assistance and capacity-building to improve human rights in Libya, the Council condemned in the strongest terms the terrorist acts, hostage-taking and violence committed against civilians by the so-called Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (Da’esh in Libya) and other terrorist organizations, and requested the High Commissioner to urgently dispatch a mission to investigate violations and abuses of international human rights law in Libya with a view to ensuring full accountability.

    The Council extended for a period of one year the mandate of the Independent Expert on the human rights situation in Mali, and noted the efforts of the Government of Mali to bring before an independent and impartial justice system all perpetrators of human rights violations, as well as its continued cooperation with the International Criminal Court. In a resolution on strengthening technical cooperation in Guinea, the Council called on the Government of Guinea to ensure that the elections to be held in 2015 were conducted in a peaceful and transparent manner, and called on the international community to support Guinea’s efforts in the fight against Ebola.

    The Council requested the High Commissioner to prepare a study on the impact of the world drug problem on the enjoyment of human rights and decided to convene a panel discussion on this matter at its thirtieth session.

    In a statement by the President of the Human Rights Council on the situation of human rights in Haiti, the Council welcomed and endorsed the request of the Haitian authorities to renew for one year the mandate of the Independent Expert and welcomed the launch of the "Punch" campaign on prolonged pre-trial detention.

    Joachim Rücker, President of the Human Rights Council, said the Council elected by acclamation Albert Kwokwo Barume (Democratic Republic of the Congo), as the African member of the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples; Idriss Jazairy (Algeria), as the Special Rapporteur on the negative impact of unilateral coercive measures on the enjoyment of human rights; Rhona Smith (United Kingdom), as the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Cambodia; and Dante Pesce (Chile), as the Latin American and Caribbean Member of the Working Group on the issue of human rights and transnational corporations and other business enterprises.

    The Council then adopted ad referendum the report of its twenty-eighth session presented by Mothusi Bruce Rabasha Palai, Human Rights Council Vice-President and Rapporteur.

    In his closing remarks, Mr. Rücker, President of the Human Rights Council, encouraged all those who participated in the Council’s work to discuss issues with the appropriate level of dignity and respect and condemned acts of intimidation or reprisal. He paid tribute to Ms. Jane Connors, Director of the Research and Right to Development Division of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, who was soon retiring.

    Introducing texts were Colombia, Pakistan, Algeria, Iraq, Armenia, Rwanda, and Cuba.

    Speaking in general comments were Russian Federation, Sierra Leone, Latvia, Indonesia, United States, France, Pakistan, and India.

    Speaking in explanations of the vote before or after the vote were United States, Brazil, Gabon, Netherlands, Latvia, Cuba, South Africa, Pakistan, Algeria, Venezuela, Paraguay, Japan, Sierra Leone, and Saudi Arabia.

    Libya, Guinea and Haiti spoke as concerned countries.

    The following observer States spoke on the resolutions adopted: Tunisia, Switzerland, European Union, Egypt, Australia, Costa Rica, Canada, Armenia, Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie and Iran.

    Association of World Citizens and International Service for Human Rights also took the floor in general concluding remarks.

    The twenty-eighth session of the Human Rights Council took place from 2 to 27 March 2015. Documentation, statements, resolutions and reports relating to this and all Human Rights Council sessions are available on its webpage. Detailed, speaker-by-speaker coverage of every public meeting can be found on the webpage of the United Nations Information Service Geneva.

    The Human Rights Council will next meet at 9 a.m. on Wednesday, 1 April 2015 to hold a Special Session/6B0F0815530F4CA5C1257E150036F705?OpenDocument) “in light of the terrorist attacks and human rights abuses and violations committed by the terrorist group Boko Haram”. The next regular session of the Human Rights Council will take place from 15 June to 3 July 2015. More information is available on the Council’s webpage.

    Action on Resolution under the Agenda Item on Follow-up to and the Implementation of the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action

    Action on Resolution on the Contribution of the Human Rights Council to the Special Session of the General Assembly on the World Drug Problem of 2016

    In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.22) on the contribution of the Human Rights Council to the special session of the General Assembly on the world drug problem of 2016, adopted without a vote, the Council requests the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights to prepare a study to be presented to the Human Rights Council at its thirtieth session, on the impact of the world drug problem on the enjoyment of human rights, and recommendations on respect for and the protection and promotion of human rights in the context of the world drug problem, with particular consideration for the needs of persons affected and persons in vulnerable situations. The Council also decides to convene a panel discussion at its thirtieth session on the impact of the world drug problem on the enjoyment of human rights and requests the Office of the High Commissioner to prepare a report on the panel discussion in the form of a summary. The Council invites the High Commissioner to submit to the Commission on Narcotic Drugs, through the Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, the contribution of the Human Rights Council to the special session of the General Assembly on the world drug problem to be held in 2016; and invites the General Assembly to take into account the contribution of the Human Rights Council during its special session on the world drug problem in 2016 and of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs during the preparatory process.

    Colombia, introducing resolution L.22, said that the preparatory process of the draft resolution was inclusive, with the participation of all specialized agencies. There was no other better contribution on the impact of the world drug problem on human rights. The objective was to open the debate and not prejudge any outcomes, and there would be no duplication of work. The goal was to present different perspectives on the human rights aspect of the world drug problem, and to that end a study would be published and then complemented by an open discussion. Colombia said it believed that the text was balanced, and expressed hope that Member States would approve it.

    Russia, in a general comment, believed that the main guiding body dealing with the spread of drugs was the Commission on Narcotic Drugs at the United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime. Any attempts to fight the spread of drugs in other fora was counterproductive and could lead to the duplication of work. Alternative approaches to fighting the drug problem through the question of human rights were inappropriate. The provision inviting the High Commissioner to prepare a report on the issue would be an additional burden to the agenda of the Human Rights Council.

    United States, in an explanation of the vote before the vote, said there was no dispute between human rights efforts and the efforts to counter the spread of drugs. Thus the United States supported the resolution. The United States appreciated Former High Commissioner Navi Pillay’s efforts towards an integrated and balanced strategy to counter the spread of drugs. The United States was concerned about the high costs this resolution would incur and asked Human Rights Council to minimize the costs involved.

    Action on Resolution under the Agenda Item on Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance

    Action on the Resolution on Combatting Intolerance, Negative Stereotyping and Stigmatization of, and Discrimination, Incitement to Violence and Violence against, Persons Based on Religion or Belief

    In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.4) on combatting intolerance, negative stereotyping and stigmatization of, and discrimination, incitement to violence and violence against, persons based on religion or belief, adopted without a vote, the Council deeply condemns any advocacy of religious hatred that constitutes incitement to discrimination, hostility or violence, whether it involves the use of print, audio-visual or electronic media or any other means; calls upon all States to take effective measures to ensure that public functionaries do not discriminate against an individual on the basis of religion or belief; to foster religious freedom and pluralism by promoting the ability of members of all religious communities to manifest their religion, and to contribute openly and on an equal footing to society; to encourage the representation and meaningful participation of individuals, irrespective of their religion, in all sectors of society; and to make a strong effort to counter religious profiling, which is understood to be the invidious use of religion as a criterion in conducting questionings, searches and other law enforcement investigative procedures. The Council further calls upon States to adopt measures and policies to promote full respect for and protection of places of worship and religious sites, cemeteries and shrines. The Council requests the High Commissioner to prepare and submit to the Human Rights Council, at its thirty-first session, a comprehensive follow-up report with elaborated conclusions and potential follow-up measures.

    Pakistan, introducing resolution L.4, noted that the oral revision stressed the urgent need to implement all parts of the action plan of the resolution, with equal focus and attention to address religious intolerance. The added language also addressed the time Member States had at their disposal to submit their submissions. The resolution addressed rising religious intolerance and violence based on religion. Practical steps were at the heart of the resolution, and they had to be implemented by all States in a comprehensive manner. Muslim populations were subjected to discrimination and marginalization. The rise of the Islamophobic agenda in many countries was noted, as well as media stigmatization. The selective application of the freedom of expression was worrying. Muslims had to be treated the same way as other citizens.

    Sierra Leone, in a general comment, expressed its appreciation for draft resolution L.4. Sierra Leon was a diverse country which enjoyed tolerance between different religious communities. However, there had recently been problems between groups that had lived together for centuries. Terrorist groups were using religious differences to spark intolerance between religious groups, and incite anger between groups that had lived together for centuries. Therefore this was a timely resolution and Sierra Leone would support it fully.

    Latvia, on behalf of the European Union, in a general comment, deplored violence and intolerance towards others. Addressing religious intolerance required more than passing resolutions. Concrete actions and implementation were needed. The action plan in the resolution provided useful guidance in this regard. People and ideas moved across borders, but the problems of intolerance lay mostly within countries. Respect of human rights had to be put at the heart of everything that was done. For these reasons, the European Union expressed its support for this resolution and its central message that they must stand together to promote tolerance and fight hatred.

    Indonesia, in a general comment, said that the draft resolution was timely and important, due to the rising religiously inspired violence. The text and previous similar resolutions would contribute to Indonesia’s efforts to fight discrimination on the basis of religion. Indonesia promoted tolerance and understanding between different nations. The resolution would serve as the main point of reference in the fight against discrimination based on religion. Indonesia expressed hope that Member States would adopt the resolution.

    Action on Resolutions under the Agenda Item on Technical Assistance and Capacity Building

    Action on Resolution on Technical Assistance and Capacity Building to Improve Human Rights in Libya

    In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.7/Rev.1) on technical assistance and capacity-building to improve human rights in Libya, adopted without a vote, the Council condemns in the strongest terms the terrorist acts, hostage-taking and violence committed against civilians by the so-called Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (Da’esh in Libya) and other terrorist organizations, their violent extremist ideology and their continued gross, systematic and widespread abuse of human rights and violations of international humanitarian law; calls for those responsible for violations or abuses of international human rights law, including sexual violence and violations and abuses against children, to be held accountable in accordance with international standards; calls upon the Government of Libya to increase efforts to end impunity; expresses grave concern at the rise in the number of conflict-related detainees, including children, and at reports of torture and sexual and gender-based violence in detention centres. The Council requests the High Commissioner urgently to dispatch a mission to investigate violations and abuses of international human rights law that have been committed in Libya since the beginning of 2014, and to establish the facts and circumstances of such abuses and violations, with a view to avoiding impunity and ensuring full accountability, in coordination with the United Nations Support Mission in Libya, and to submit to the Human Rights Council at its thirty-first session, a written report on its findings.

    Algeria, introducing draft resolution L.7/Rev.1, said that this was being presented at a crucial moment in light of the situation in Libya. The text presented was an update to the text presented the previous year, taking into account the political crisis, terrorism, and the impact this situation had had on the country. It contained a new paragraph 18, on the Commission of Inquiry in Libya. It also requested the Human Rights Council to present a written report on technical assistance and capacity building in Libya during the thirty-first session of the Human Rights Council. The draft resolution had been in consultation with all partners. It was therefore hoped that it would be adopted by consensus.

    Latvia, in a general comment on behalf of the European Union, expressed support for the resolution because the current situation in Libya was deeply concerning. It had to be ensured that the Council responded appropriately, in particular to ensure accountability for the committed violations, and that it contributed to the building of sustainable peace. The International Criminal Court should play a crucial role in Libya.

    Russian Federation, in a general comment, said Russia supported the Libyan people. It highly appreciated the Government’s cooperation with United Nations human rights mechanisms. However, it noted that the resolution did not mention the threat of terrorism that Libya faced today. It was necessary to understand that terrorists were the main threat to Libya and the region. The Russian Federation expressed conviction that Libyans had to unite their forces to push back terrorists, and therefore it joined the consensus on the resolution.

    Libya, speaking as the concerned country, thanked the African Group and the representative of Algeria for presenting L.7/REV.1 on technical assistance and capacity building in Libya, and thanked all countries that sponsored this resolution. This would give a new dynamism to cooperation between Libya and the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights. Libya wanted to show all of the challenges in full transparency, and to show that the competent authorities could promote national dialogue. There were negative effects due to terrorist armed groups operating. There were severe human rights violations by Da’ash. Progress had been made at the national level. Dialogue was the only way to ensure that democracy was adopted by the people and supported by the international community.

    Action on Resolution on Technical Assistance and Capacity Building in the Field of Human Rights in Mali

    In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.9) on technical assistance and capacity building in the field of human rights in Mali, adopted without a vote, the Council decides to extend for a period of one year the mandate of the Independent Expert on the human rights situation in Mali, and asks him to report to the Council at its session in March 2016. The Council requests the High Commissioner to provide technical assistance to the Government of Mali, including the Commission on truth, justice and reconciliation. It urges the international community to continue its assistance to Mali, particularly in achieving stability, fighting impunity and promoting respect for all human rights. The Council strongly condemns the armed attacks and all forms of violence in Mali, especially in the northern regions of the country, as well as human rights violations and abuses of international humanitarian law committed against the civilian population, including women and children. The Council reiterates its call for an immediate end to all acts of violence and human rights violations, and notes the efforts of the Government of Mali to bring before an independent and impartial justice system all perpetrators of human rights violations, as well as its continued cooperation with the International Criminal Court.

    Algeria, introducing draft resolution L.9 on behalf of the African Group, presented oral revisions to the text and said that this was the fourth resolution on Mali since the outbreak of the crisis. The objective was to renew the mandate of the Special Rapporteur to enable him to assist the Government in the steps to promote and protect of human rights and establish the rule of law. The resolution referred to the signing of the peace agreement, the fight against impunity and the assistance to internally displaced persons and refugees, among other issues.

    Latvia, in a general comment on behalf of the European Union, welcomed the adoption of resolution L.9 by consensus. It praised the commitment of Mali to the promotion and protection of human rights. However, the security situation in Mali was still worrying and violations of human rights continued. The European Union thus called on the Government of Mali to continue its efforts to improve the situation and renew their commitment to fight against impunity. The judiciary should be strengthened to that end. The Council should keep the situation in Mali on its agenda. The European Union fully supported the extension of the mandate of the Independent Expert.

    Action on Resolution on Technical Assistance and Capacity Building in strengthening Human Rights in Iraq in Light of the Abuses Committed by Da’esh and Associated Terrorist Groups

    In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.29) on technical assistance and capacity building in strengthening human rights in Iraq in light of the abuses committed by Da’esh and associated terrorist groups, adopted without a vote, the Council condemns in the strongest possible terms continued, widespread and grave abuses of human rights and violations of international humanitarian law committed by Da’esh and associated terrorist groups and strongly condemns in particular all violence committed against persons based on their religion or ethnicity, as well as attacks on civilians, particularly against women and children; urges the Iraqi government to investigate all alleged abuses and violations of human rights and violations of International Humanitarian Law; urges the international community to assist Iraq in its efforts to ensure humanitarian assistance to internally displaced persons fleeing the areas affected by violence and to put in place measures to protect mass graves sites caused by Da’esh; and requests the High Commissioner for Human Rights to provide technical assistance to the Government of Iraq to assist in promoting and protecting human rights and to provide a written report on it at the 30th Session of the Human Rights Council in September 2015.

    Iraq, introducing draft resolution L.29, said Iraq was seriously concerned that the human rights of the people of Iraq were being violated by Da’ash. Terrorism was not exclusively a problem for Iraq but for the entire international community. The draft resolution took note of the report by the mission of inquiry on violations in Iraq committed by Da’ash. In paragraph 1, the resolution condemned in the strongest possible terms the widespread abuse of human rights by Da’ash and all other groups. In paragraph 2 the resolution urged the Government to investigate all alleged abuses. Paragraph 4 urged the provision of technical assistance for Iraq. Iraq urged the Council to adopt the resolution

    United States, in a general comment, expressed deep concern about the human rights situation in Iraq, particularly by horrific acts committed by ISIL or Da’esh which might amount to crimes against humanity, war crimes and even genocide. Successful stabilization began with fair treatment beforehand and the United States urged Iraq to protect civilians and prevent acts of revenge which would build trust between liberated communities and the Government of Iraq. Iraq should also undertake investigation into all human rights violations and abuses, including by its own security forces and associated militia groups. The United States looked forward to the High Commissioner for Human Rights’ report on Iraq which would shed light on human rights violations and abuses by all parties.

    France, in a general comment, said that this draft resolution would allow the situation in Iraq to remain on the agenda of the Council and said that Da’esh continued to take apart the rule of law, cultural diversity and human rights in Iraq. The work of the High Commissioner was absolutely essential to document all crimes so that justice could be provided for all the people in Iraq. The allegations of crimes committed by national security forces and associated armed groups were worrisome and France urged Iraq to investigate all the allegations and prevent abuses from occurring.

    Latvia, in a general comment on behalf of the European Union, said it remained deeply concerned about the violence committed by Da’esh in Iraq and about indications that war crimes may have been committed by other parties in the conflict. It called on the Iraqi Government to ensure that all the perpetrators were held accountable in line with international law. The European Union also urged Iraq to accede to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. The European Union remained committed to keeping the alarming situation in Iraq on the Council’s agenda.

    Brazil, in an explanation of the vote before the vote, supported the resolution in light of the violence committed by Da’esh and other armed groups. However, Brazil was concerned that the resolution fell short of properly addressing the human rights violations committed by the terrorist and armed groups. It was disturbing that the report of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights indicated indiscriminate targeting of civilians, arbitrary killings and abductions. Brazil insisted that all crimes must be investigated and perpetrators held accountability. Inclusive and non-sectarian dialogue was necessary in order to achieve sustainable peace in Iraq.

    Action on Resolution on Strengthening Technical Cooperation and Advisory Services in Guinea

    In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.31) on the strengthening of technical cooperation and advisory services in Guinea, adopted without a vote, the Council calls upon the Government of Guinea to ensure that the elections to be held in 2015 take place in conditions of peace, transparency and security, with full respect for human rights and democratic standards. The Council welcomes the efforts by the Government of Guinea to strengthen the rule of law and improve the human rights situation in the country, and to undertake reforms in the security and defence sectors that incorporate respect for human rights and guarantee the enjoyment of civil and political rights. The Council welcomes the progress made with regard to the reform of the justice sector and encourages the Government of Guinea to pursue its efforts to fight impunity. The Council firmly reiterates its appeal to the international community to provide the Government of Guinea with appropriate assistance to promote respect for human rights, the fight against impunity and the reform of the security and justice sectors, as well as the initiatives that are under way to promote truth, justice and national reconciliation; and invites the High Commissioner to submit to the Human Rights Council at its thirty-first session a report on the situation of human rights and the work of the Office of the High Commissioner in Guinea.

    Algeria, introducing draft resolution L.31/rev.1 on behalf of the African Group, said there had been an oral revision of paragraph 4, “calls upon Guinean authorities to pursue efforts to consolidate freedom of assembly, including freedom and protection of journalists.” This reflected the projects in Guinea in view of strengthening the rule of law. The first round of elections would take on 11 October 2015, and they were the reason why the new draft resolution contained more paragraphs. The draft aimed to ensure peaceful democratic elections. It encouraged Guinea to appoint a panel of judges to investigate violence against women and girls committed in September 2009. It ensured the impartiality and independence of the judges and the safety of witnesses including psychological support. It also compensated victims. Finally, it reiterated the appeal by the international community to fight against impunity, and to promote truth, justice and international cooperation.

    Latvia, in a general comment on behalf of the European Union, welcomed the adoption of the resolution L.31/Rev.1 and the constructive spirit in which the negotiations had taken place. Regardless of the progress made in Guinea over the past year, efforts of the Government were needed in the national reconciliation process and the resolution urged the Government to fight impunity and ensure investigation into the massacre of September 2014, follow through the judicial sector reform and undertake training of the police. For all those reasons, it was important to keep Guinea on the agenda of the Council.

    Guinea, speaking as the concerned country, thanked all those who expressed their support for the resolution and said that the Government was prepared to work tirelessly to promote and protect human rights. Guinea was firmly committed to intensify efforts to address the human rights challenges, including national reconciliation and transitional justice, strengthening the rule of law, combatting intolerable violence against women and girls, and to work vigorously on the investigation of the September 2014 massacre. Bringing justice to the victims was the least that could be done. Further, Guinea would strengthen freedom of expression and freedom of journalists, ensure the conditions for the holding of free and fair elections, undertake very strong reform of the justice, and fight against impunity. Human rights and respect for human rights was the only path to peace and establishment of democratic institutions, Guinea concluded.

    Action on President’s Statement on the Situation of Human Rights in Haiti

    In a statement by the President of the Human Rights Council (A/HRC/28/L.37) on the situation of human rights in Haiti, adopted without a vote, the Council welcomes and endorses the request of the Haitian authorities to renew for one year the mandate of the Independent Expert on the situation of human rights in Haiti. The Council invites the Independent Expert to assist the Government of Haiti in the implementation of his recommendations and those issued by other Special Procedures and to present its report on the situation of human rights in Haiti to March 2016 session of the Council of Human Rights. The Council notes the latest legal and policy developments in Haiti, including progress on civil and political, economic, social and cultural rights. The Council encourages the Government of Haiti to continue to strengthen the rule of law, and to fight against impunity, corruption, crime and its causes. The Council strongly encourages the Government of Haiti to continue to strengthen the capacity of the national police and the judiciary, and particularly welcomes the launch in March 2015, of the "Punch" campaign which aims to provide an urgent and structured response to the phenomenon of prolonged pre-trial detention. The Council encourages the international community to strengthen cooperation and coordination with the Haitian authorities.

    Haiti, speaking as the concerned country, thanked the group of friends and the Special Rapporteur, and was very pleased that the extension of his mandate had been approved. The Government was fully committed to create a sustainable environment that would lead to free democratic elections. This was seen through the new provisions adopted that guaranteed a safe environment for the elections.

    France, speaking in a general comment on behalf of a Group of Friends of Haiti, praised the work of the Independent Expert and the excellent efforts he had carried out to prepare the very specific recommendations to strengthen institutions and the rights of all in Haiti, including the most vulnerable. The Group of Friends of Haiti was ready to assist Haiti in the establishment of the rule of law, human rights and democracy.

    Gabon, in an explanation of the vote after the vote on behalf of the Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie, welcomed the extension of the mandate of the Independent Expert on technical assistance and capacity building in Haiti and stressed the importance of the upcoming election in this country for the rule of law and democracy. The Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie welcomed the publication of the electoral timetable and the launch of the electoral process in Haiti. The Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie also welcomed the extension of the mandate of the Independent Expert on Mali and expressed concern about the deterioration of the situation in the north of the country. The return of sustainable peace and democracy was a priority. They also welcomed the adoption of the resolution on technical assistance and cooperation to Guinea.

    Action on Resolution under the Agenda Item on the Promotion and Protection of All Human Rights, Civil, Political, Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, Including the Right to Development

    Action on Resolution on the Prevention of Genocide

    In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.25) on the prevention of genocide, adopted without a vote, the Council recommends that the General Assembly designate 9 December as the International Day of Commemoration and Dignity of the Victims of Genocide in order to raise awareness of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide and its role in combatting and preventing the crime of genocide; invites the Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide to continue to execute the activities under his mandate, including in the follow-up to the present resolution, by providing States with guidance, assistance and follow-up, upon their request; invites the Special Adviser to an interactive dialogue with the Human Rights Council at its thirty-first session on the progress made in discharging his duties; and requests the Secretary-General to draw up a roster of focal points and networks on the prevention of genocide with updated information from Member States. The Council also underlines that the issue of the terrorist activities that constitute the crime of genocide as established in the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide should be addressed within the existing counter-terrorism framework; and emphasizes the important role that education, including human rights education, can play in genocide prevention, and further encourages Governments to promote, as appropriate, educational programmes and projects that contribute to the prevention of genocide.

    Before taking action on draft resolution L.25, the Human Rights Council rejected, by a vote of 23 against, 14 in favour, and 10 abstentions, amendment L.38 introduced by Cuba; and rejected, by a vote of 23 against, 15 in favour, and 9 abstentions, amendment L.42 as introduced by Pakistan. At the request of Cuba, the Council voted separately on preambular paragraph 22 and operational paragraph 17 together, adopting them by a vote of 28 in favour, 8 against and 11 abstentions.

    Armenia, introducing resolution L.25, said that the draft resolution had been presented by Armenia since 1998, and hoped that the current draft resolution would be adopted by consensus as well. The draft represented sustained efforts of Armenia at the international level to prevent the crime of genocide and to implement the Convention on the Prevention and Suppression of Genocide. It reiterated that the fight against impunity was key in the prevention of genocide. It underscored the need to identify the root causes of genocide, and suggested that a list of contact points be established to strengthen the prevention of genocide. It also proposed that 9 December be set up as the international day of commemoration of victims of genocide. The international community should mobilize to prevent genocide and other acts of violence, and Armenia thus called for the draft resolution to be adopted by consensus. The text of the resolution provided a balance for several contradictory positions, and it was hoped that such an approach would be appreciated by all Member States.

    Rwanda, also in introduction of draft resolution L.25, welcomed the tenth anniversary of the adoption of the Responsibility to Protect framework and the introduction in the resolution of language of genocide denial, which was an impediment to addressing the crimes of genocide.

    Cuba, introducing draft amendment L.38 on operative paragraph 17 of the draft resolution on the prevention of genocide, said that Member States had neither negotiated nor reached agreement in respect to the concept of the “responsibility to protect”, its scope or related issues. Cuba had very serious concerns regarding paragraphs 17 and 22, believing that these were attempts to implement and practice the so-called “responsibility to protect” in a sideways manner. The new proposed framework on the evaluation of atrocity crimes further emphasized this claim. The framework was aimed to justify military intervention in countries. Cuba was fully compliant with international law but would call on the Council to vote in favour of the amendment. In the case that the amendments on L. 38 and L.42 were not taken, then Cuba would ask for a separate vote on paragraphs 17 and 22 together.

    France, in a general comment, said that the work done so far on the prevention of genocide should be mentioned in the text. The concept of responsibility to protect should remain in the text as it was vital in the prevention of genocide. France thus called for vote on the proposed amendments, which aimed to remove that concept from the text, and it called on all Member States to reject them.

    Pakistan, introducing amendment L.43, strongly condemned all acts described as genocide under the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. Pakistan was concerned and could not accept the addition of new concepts to the international agreement on the crime of genocide. Crimes of genocide were clearly defined legal concepts and any attempt to introduce non-consensual notion such as the “responsibility to protect” or “atrocity crimes” were motivated by other concerns such as regime change.

    United States, in a general comment, urged Member States to vote no on all amendments and in favour of all paragraphs of the draft resolution. The United States was dismayed at the tabling of unclear amendments in a very late stage and in a politicized manner, and viewed all those amendments as hostile.

    France, in a general comment, called upon Member States to adopt the draft resolution as revised by Armenia. The draft reflected a balance. The subject of this resolution was very important to the cause of humanity – namely prevention of genocide. For this reason, France could not accept the amendments and asked all members to reject them.

    India, in a general comment, emphasized that genocide was an odious crime that inflicted great losses in humanity. Its support to the amendment in operative paragraph 17 was in order to strengthen the work of the Special Advisor. India also supported the Cuban statement. Therefore it would vote in favour of amendment L.38.

    Cuba, in a general comment, said that the expression used by the Ambassador of United States was inappropriate. “Hostile amendments” was not appropriate to use with regard to Cuba’s proposal. Cuba participated constructively and respectfully in relevant discussion, and it asked others to act in the same manner.

    Netherlands, in an explanation of the vote before the vote, opposed this amendment and said that operative paragraph 17 was an absolutely crucial part of the resolution which summarised the work on the prevention of genocide and the Responsibility to Protect framework. This framework needed to be used in the prevention strategies of the worst imaginable crimes, those of genocide, war crimes and crime against humanity. Operative paragraph 17 contained purely factual reference to this milestone framework and striking it from the resolution would mean denial of activities on the prevention of genocide. The Netherlands would vote no on the amendment and called on all Member States to do the same.

    Latvia, on behalf of the European Union in an explanation of the vote before the vote on amendment L.42, said that the new framework of analysis tackling the crime of genocide had been developed by the United Nations Office of the Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide and the Special Adviser on the Responsibility to Protect. It provided an integrated analysis of genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Therefore the European Union believed that full and correct reference to the work of the Special Advisors was relevant and appropriate. The amendment proposed to delete reference to the Office of the Special Advisors. The European Union regarded the contribution of the Special Advisor on responsibility to protect as important in the fight against genocide. Both Special Advisors had played a crucial role. For this reason the European Union could not accept the amendment.

    Cuba, in an explanation of the vote before the vote, said it regretted that its proposals were not accepted. It thanked Armenia for the work done on that important draft resolution. Nevertheless, efforts to include some concepts that were not universally accepted were not welcome. The Council was not a forum where the concept of the responsibility to protect would become operational. That was the task of the General Assembly. Discussions in the Council had made it evident that there were opposing views on the concept. The decision to intervene invoking the responsibility to protect was problematic because it was not clear how such intervention would be decided. Small States had the right to intervene as well as big States. Where was the difference between responsibility to protect and intervention for political reasons? The Council had to abstain from making any progress on the issue, and Cuba could not support the text as it stood.

    South Africa, in an explanation of the vote before the vote on L.25, said it had a longstanding position on the matter of the prevention of the crime of genocide. Regarding the draft resolution, the 1948 Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide had major substantive procedural gaps. There were new crimes associated with genocide that were not present in the Convention, including terrorism. The fact remained that terrorism had yet to be defined as a crime of genocide in international law. It would be preposterous for this Human Rights Council to appropriate to itself mandates of the United Nations Secretary-General. Therefore South Africa disassociated itself completely from draft resolution L.25.

    Pakistan, in an explanation of the vote before the vote on L.25, said that its amendment did not have hostile intentions. The amendment had been based on the idea that the resolution had the aim to widen the scope of the crime of genocide, and to introduce contentious concepts such as the responsibility to protect. Therefore, Pakistan fully aligned itself with the views of Cuba and South Africa. The dubious concept of “responsibility to protect” was a red line, as it could amount to regime change. It could also be, and was, an excuse to pursue double standards in the implementation of the responsibility to protect. Therefore, Pakistan disassociated itself from preambular paragraph 22 and operational paragraph 17 of L.25. Pakistan requested that this be mentioned in the summary report of the proceedings of the Human Rights Council accordingly.

    Algeria, in an explanation of the vote before the vote, said that the resolution as a whole was not problematic. Algeria firmly condemned all measures that could lead to genocide and highlighted that in some provisions the resolution was not in line with the concept of the responsibility to protect and with the African position as described in the Constitutive Act of the African Union.

    Venezuela, speaking in an explanation of the vote before the vote, disassociated itself from the preambular paragraph 22 and the operative paragraph 17 because of the same reasons laid down by Cuba and South Africa.

    Explanations of the Vote after the Vote after the Conclusion of Taking Action on Resolutions under the Agenda Item on the Promotion and Protection of All Human Rights, Civil, Political, Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, Including the Right to Development

    Paraguay, in an explanation of the vote after the vote, said it voted in favour of the resolution on the effects of terrorism on human rights. However, it underlined that States should always protect human rights of all persons without discrimination, and noted that it would prefer that the resolution provide an even clearer reference to that responsibility.

    Brazil, in an explanation of the vote after the vote, underscored that the protection of the environment was one of the pillars of economic development. However, it did not support the change of nomenclature on the issue of human rights obligations in relation to a clean and safe environment. It preferred to keep the current title of the mandate holder as Independent Expert.

    Japan, in an explanation of the vote after the vote, said that precious lives had been lost in acts of terrorism perpetuated by extremist groups and Japan expressed support for the resolution on the protection of human rights while fighting terrorism. Japan would continue to combat terrorism with the international community and make diplomatic efforts to this end.

    United States, in an explanation of the vote after the vote, concerning resolution L.26 on the right to work, said that the United States had joined the consensus in the recognition that this right was enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and was concerned that the resolution impinged on the role and responsibility of the International Labour Organization and was of the opinion that the Human Rights Council should not expand its resources on the topic that was already dealt with by another international institution. With regard to the right to development, referenced in several resolutions adopted in this session, the United States said that the right to development did not have an international meaning and work was needed to make it consistent with human rights. This was not to mean that the United States was against development, to the contrary, the United States was the world’s largest development donor.

    Sierra Leone, speaking in an explanation of the vote after the vote, expressed its satisfaction with the adoption of L.10 on the Independent Expert on the enjoyment of human rights of persons with albinism. These persons suffered from discrimination, violence and atrocities that prevented them from enjoying human rights, including the right to life.

    South Africa, speaking in an explanation of the vote after the vote, thanked all members of the African Group for entrusting it in the mandate to oversee the draft resolution L.11 /Rev.1 on the renewal of the mandate of the open-ended intergovernmental working group to consider the possibility of elaborating an international regulatory framework on the regulation, monitoring and oversight of the activities of private military and security companies. It had hoped resolution L.11 could have been adopted by consensus so that South Africa could continue ongoing constructive work, but the European Union had blocked it, and discredited the work of South Africa. South Africa urged the European Union to desist from such behaviour, and focus on common collective responsibility.

    Venezuela, in an explanation of the vote after the vote, had serious concerns about the notion “responsibility to protect” and said that it would erode standards. Venezuela was concerned about including this notion as a standard within the United Nations and said that Venezuela had firmly rejected its use to undermine the sovereignty and independence of nations. The use of this framework was a violation of the United Nations Charter, and further discussions on the responsibility to protect should take place in the General Assembly, in the presence of all States. Venezuela was a supporter of the notion of the prevention of genocide.

    Saudi Arabia, speaking also on behalf of the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain in an explanation of the vote after the vote, said that genocide must be prevented because it was a crime against human rights and against United Nations values and principles. Every effort had been made to put across the concerns about some of the paragraphs in resolution L.25 but those amendments had unfortunately not been accepted and therefore Saudi Arabia had left the consensus on the preambular paragraph 22 and the operative paragraph 17.

    Appointment of Special Procedure Mandate-Holders

    JOACHIM RUECKER, President of the Human Rights Council, said the Council elected by acclamation Albert Kwokwo Barume (Democratic Republic of the Congo), as the African member of the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples; Idriss Jazairy (Algeria), as the Special Rapporteur on the negative impact of unilateral coercive measures on the enjoyment of human rights; Rhona Smith (United Kingdom), as the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Cambodia; and Dante Pesce (Chile), as the Latin American and Caribbean Member of the Working Group on the issue of human rights and transnational corporations and other business enterprises.

    General Comments by Observer States

    Tunisia, in a statement on behalf of 51 States, expressed strong support for the independence of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights and the High Commissioner. In the interest of the promotion and protection of human rights, it was important to keep separate the Office of the United Nations Secretary-General and the General Assembly from the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights. The report of the Joint Inspection Unit raised concern that the independence of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights would be undermined.

    Switzerland thanked the States which had supported the draft resolutions L.19, L.22 and L.27. On L.29 Switzerland was very worried that war crimes, genocide and crimes against humanity may have been committed by ISIL. That was why it joined the consensus on this resolution, but was disappointed that the text did not include all parties to the conflict in Iraq, including the Iraqi Government. On the draft resolution L.30 on terrorism, it was important to achieve consensus on the issue of human rights protection in the context of the fight against terrorism in the future. On L.25, the prevention of genocide was a priority for Switzerland, and it welcomed the new framework of analysis.

    European Union said concerning the Presidential Statement on 70 years since the end of World War II that a resolution to that effect would be introduced at the General Assembly.

    Egypt shared the position of other delegations which disassociated themselves from preambular paragraph 22 and operative paragraph 17 of resolution L.25 on the prevention of genocide. Egypt said that the notion of sexual education did not have a basis in international human rights law and entailed controversial notions that promoted certain lifestyles. On the resolution on human rights, democracy and the rule of law, Egypt would be paying attention to the application of the organizational modalities for the Forum and would closely follow the work of the newly created mandate on the right to privacy in the digital age.

    Australia said it was pleased to sponsor the resolution on the prevention of genocide. The prevention of mass atrocities, including genocide, should be a collective priority and Australia strongly supported all efforts in that regard. It noted the adoption of the resolution on the right to privacy in the digital age, which established a Special Rapporteur on the right to privacy. It also welcomed the resolution on the human rights situation in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, the resolution on technical assistance to Iraq, and the resolution on the effects of terrorism on human rights.

    Costa Rica said with respect to the resolution on the composition of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, Costa Rica supported the resolution in its original form. The Office had to reflect its multicultural composition. However, the Council should adopt measures to guide the work of the Office. The Office and its officers were indivisible and their main task was to ensure the full enjoyment of human rights in the world.

    Canada took the opportunity to underscore its appreciation on some draft resolutions and some concerns. On L.23 Canada was pleased to co-sponsor the initiative on improving maternal health. Regarding L.27 establishing the Special Rapporteur on the right to privacy, the views in the resolution were in accordance with Canada’s views. Regarding L.10 Canada recognized that acts of violence against persons with albinism were unacceptable, and it appreciated the leadership of the African Group to end violence against persons with albinism. Despite the underfunded Human Rights Council, two new mandates had been created and the mandates of five were renewed.

    Armenia greatly valued the adoption of the Presidential Statement commemorating 70 years since the end of the Second World War. With due respect to the statement, Armenia proposed to rephrase one of the phrases in the statement as follows: “take appropriate measures to strengthen peace, based on principles of equal rights and self-determination of people” in line with United Nations Charter.

    Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie took positive note of several resolutions, including on human rights, democracy, rule of law, and the rights of the child, as well as resolutions on technical assistance and capacity building in Haiti, Mali and Guinea. The creation of the mandate on the human rights of persons with albinism was only the beginning of a long journey that would hopefully improve the situation of persons with albinism and end the unacceptable violence of which they were victims.

    Iran thanked Armenia for tabling the resolution on the prevention of genocide L.25 and disassociated itself from the part of the resolution that referred to the controversial notion of the “responsibility to protect”.

    Report of the Session

    JOACHIM RÜCKER, President of the Human Rights Council, proposed the adoption of the report of the session. The draft report was placed on the extranet yesterday afternoon.

    MOTHUSI BRUCE RABASHA PALAI, Vice-President and Rapporteur of the Council, introducing the draft report, said that it contained a procedural description of work up until Thursday morning, 26 March, at 12 noon. Any comments or corrections could be sent through the Secretariat of the Council. The final draft report would be posted on the extranet. The format was based on the agenda of the Council. The text of resolutions, decisions and Presidential Statements adopted during the session would be available in due course on the website of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights and subsequently included in part one of the final report. During this session, 92 dignitaries had addressed the Council, which held discussion on a wide range of topics, and heard reports of two Commissions of Inquiry. Further, the Council had adopted outcome reports of the Universal Periodic Review for 14 countries, and had appointed four special procedure mandate holders.

    JOACHIM RÜCKER, President of the Human Rights Council, said the report was adopted ad referendum.

    General Concluding Remarks

    Association of World Citizens said it was pleased to see that the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights had reached a better geographical representation and expressed hope that interns working in the Office would also be involved in the concept of staff, as their work was immeasurable.

    International Service for Human Rights, in a joint statement with several NGOs1 said it was concerned by the overall failure of the Council to address grave violations of human rights. There had been a failure to adopt a resolution on Iraq. While the resolution on Myanmar was welcome, it failed to address the recent crackdown on students. There was also no firm stance on the situation in Ukraine. It was dismayed by the deeply flawed resolution on the effects of terrorism on human rights, which did not take into account the civil society dimension.

    Closing of the Session

    JOACHIM RÜCKER, President of the Human Rights Council, in his closing remarks, said that the Council had adopted 34 resolutions and three Presidential Statements, and encouraged all those who participated in the Council’s work to discuss issues with the appropriate level of dignity and respect. It was encouraging to see that many States had played an active and positive role in supporting non-governmental organizations and human rights defenders, but more needed to be done. He reminded States of resolution 16/21 in which the Council had collectively rejected any act of intimidation or reprisal against individuals and groups who cooperated or had cooperated with the United Nations. Two new Special Procedure mandates had been created at this session; the vacancies would be advertised shortly by the Secretariat and the President encouraged highly-qualified women candidates to apply. The President paid tribute to Ms. Jane Connors, Director of the Research and Right to Development Division of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, who was soon retiring. Finally, the President called on all to work together to achieve tangible results to make a difference for human rights on the ground, and then closed the twenty-eighth regular session of the Human Rights Council.

    1 . Joint statement: International Service for Human Rights; Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (FORUM-ASIA); Human Rights Watch; International Federation for Human Rights Leagues (FIDH); Human Rights House Foundation; and CIVICUS – World Alliance for Citizen Participation.

    For use of the information media; not an official record


    0 0

    Source: UN Human Rights Council
    Country: Guinea, Haiti, Iraq, Libya, Mali, World

    APRES MIDI

    27 mars 2015

    Il adopte également des résolutions sur la prévention du génocide, le problème de la drogue, la violence fondée sur la religion et la nomme quatre titulaires de mandat

    Le Conseil des droits de l'homme a adopté, cet après-midi, les huit derniers textes qui lui étaient soumis, dont cinq au titre de l'assistance technique et au renforcement des capacités s'agissant de la Libye, du Mali, de L'Iraq, de la Guinée et d'Haïti. Des résolutions ont également porté sur la violence fondée sur la religion, la prévention du génocide et le problème de la drogue. Aucun de ces textes n'a dû être soumis à un vote. Le Conseil a également procédé à la nomination de quatre titulaires de mandat. Il a aussi adopté son rapport de session ad referendum.

    Le Conseil a notamment condamné dans les termes les plus forts les actes terroristes et les violences contre les civils perpétrés par le prétendu État islamique d'Iraq et du Levant et d'autres organisations terroristes en Libye et prie le Haut-Commissaire aux droits de l'homme de dépêcher d'urgence une mission chargée d'enquêter sur ces violation et autres atteintes au droit international des droits de l'homme commises en Libye depuis le début de 2014, et d'établir les faits, afin d'éviter l'impunité et d'assurer la pleine mise en cause des responsables.

    Le Conseil a également condamné les atteintes systématiques, généralisées et graves aux droits de l'homme et les violations du droit international humanitaire commises par Daesh en Iraq contre des populations civiles. Il a dans ce contexte demandé que la communauté internationale aide l'Iraq à apporter une assistance humanitaire aux personnes déplacées qui fuient les zones touchées par la violence, et à mettre en place des mesures visant à protéger les sites où se trouvent des charniers de personnes tuées par Daesh.

    Le Conseil a aussi appelé le Gouvernement guinéen à s'assurer que les élections qui seront organisées en 2015 se déroulent dans un cadre pacifique, transparent, de sécurité et respectant pleinement les droits de l'homme et les principes démocratiques.

    Le Conseil a également décidé de proroger pour une période d'un an les mandats des Experts indépendants chargés, respectivement, de la situation des droits de l'homme en Haïti et au Mali. S'agissant du Mali, il a fermement condamné les attaques armées et toutes les violences perpétrées dans ce pays, en particulier dans les régions du nord du pays.

    Au titre de la promotion et de la protection des droits de l'homme, le Conseil a adopté une résolution sur la prévention du génocide dans laquelle il rappelle la responsabilité de chaque État de protéger sa population contre le génocide et de faire face aux situations complexes qui comportent un risque de génocide. Il invite par ailleurs le Conseiller spécial du Secrétaire général sur la prévention du génocide à participer, à sa session de mars 2016, à un dialogue sur les progrès réalisés dans l’exécution de son mandat.

    Le Conseil a également adopté des textes concernant sa contribution à la session extraordinaire de l'Assemblée générale consacrée au problème mondial de la drogue prévue pour 2016, ainsi que sur sur la lutte contre l'intolérance, les stéréotypes négatifs, la stigmatisation, la discrimination, l'incitation à la violence et la violence visant certaines personnes en raison de leur religion ou de leurs convictions.

    Le Conseil a par ailleurs procédé à la nomination de la nouvelle Rapporteuse spéciale sur la situation des droits de l'homme au Cambodge et du nouveau Rapporteur spécial sur les effets négatifs des mesures coercitives unilatérales sur l'exercice des droits de l'homme, ainsi que de deux experts en tant que membres, respectivement, du Mécanisme d'experts sur les droits des peuples autochtones et du Groupe de travail sur la question des droits de l'homme et des sociétés transnationales et autres entreprises.

    Outre les interventions des États membres du Conseil dans le cadre de l'examen des projets soumis pour adoption, le Conseil a entendu en fin de séance les déclarations de plusieurs délégations observatrices s'agissant des textes adoptés au cours de la session.

    Dans une déclaration de clôture, le Président du Conseil, M. Joachim Rücker, a jugé encourageant de constater que de nombreux États jouent un rôle actif et positif dans le soutien aux organisations non gouvernementales et aux défenseurs des droits de l'homme, mais a regretté qu'il y a encore loin de la coupe aux lèvres et il s'est dit à la fois alarmé et attristé par les nombreux cas d'intimidation et d'attaques contre les militants qui entendent coopérer avec le Conseil des droits de l'homme.

    Le Conseil des droits de l'homme tiendra, le mercredi 1er avril, une session spéciale «à la lumière des attaques terroristes et des violations des droits de l'homme commises par le groupe terroriste Boko Haram». La prochaine session ordinaire du Conseil se tiendra au Palais des Nations, à Genève, du 15 juin au 3 juillet 2015.

    Adoption de résolutions et d'une déclaration du Président

    Suivi et application de la Déclaration et du Programme d'action de Vienne

    Le Conseil a adopté par consensus une résolution portant sur sa contribution à la session extraordinaire de l'Assemblée générale consacrée au problème mondial de la drogue prévue pour 2016 (A/HRC/28/L.22), dans laquelle il prie le Haut-Commissaire aux droits de l'homme d'établir, pour la session de septembre 2015 du Conseil, une étude sur l'impact du problème mondial de la drogue pour la jouissance des droits de l'homme, l'attention étant portée tout particulièrement sur les besoins des personnes touchées et des personnes en situation de vulnérabilité. Il décide d'organiser, également en septembre prochain, une table ronde sur les effets du problème mondial de la drogue sur la jouissance des droits de l'homme, à la lumière de l'étude du Haut-Commissaire. Le Conseil souligne que le problème mondial de la drogue exige des stratégies de réduction de l'offre et de la demande qui soient scientifiquement fondées, intégrées, multidisciplinaires, complémentaires, équilibrées et complètes. Il rappelle que l'Assemblée générale a décidé de convoquer (résolution 67/193), au début de 2016, une session extraordinaire sur le problème mondial de la drogue, pour examiner l'état d'avancement de la mise en œuvre de la Déclaration politique et du Plan d'action sur la coopération internationale en vue d'une stratégie intégrée et équilibrée de lutte contre le problème mondial de la drogue.

    Le racisme, la discrimination raciale, la xénophobie et l'intolérance qui y est associée

    Aux termes d'une résolution adoptée sans vote sur la lutte contre l'intolérance, les stéréotypes négatifs, la stigmatisation, la discrimination, l'incitation à la violence et la violence visant certaines personnes en raison de leur religion ou de leurs convictions (A/HRC/28/L.4), le Conseil se déclare profondément préoccupé par la persistance de graves stéréotypes désobligeants, du profilage négatif et de la stigmatisation visant certaines personnes en raison de leur religion ou de leurs convictions, ainsi que par les programmes et projets dans lesquels sont engagés des individus, organisations et groupes extrémistes qui ont pour objectif de créer ou de perpétuer des stéréotypes négatifs concernant certains groupes religieux, en particulier lorsqu'ils sont tolérés par les autorités. Le Conseil condamne résolument tout appel à la haine religieuse qui constitue une incitation à la discrimination, à l'hostilité ou à la violence, qu'il soit fait usage pour cela de la presse écrite, des médias audiovisuels ou électroniques ou de tout autre moyen.

    Le Conseil demande à la communauté internationale de favoriser un dialogue à l'échelle mondiale en vue de promouvoir une culture de la tolérance et de la paix, fondée sur le respect des droits de l'homme et de la diversité des religions et des convictions. Il considère que le débat d'idées public et ouvert et le dialogue interconfessionnel et interculturel aux niveaux local, national et international peuvent compter parmi les meilleures protections contre l'intolérance religieuse et jouer un rôle positif dans le renforcement de la démocratie et la lutte contre la haine religieuse, et est convaincu que la poursuite du dialogue sur ces questions peut aider à mettre un terme aux idées fausses.

    Le Conseil prend note de la déclaration faite par le Secrétaire général de l'Organisation de la Conférence islamique à la quinzième session du Conseil des droits de l'homme et s'appuie sur l'appel qu'il a lancé aux États pour qu'ils prennent les mesures ci-après afin de favoriser, au niveau national, un climat de tolérance religieuse, de paix et de respect: encourager la création de réseaux collaboratifs pour favoriser la compréhension mutuelle, promouvoir le dialogue et susciter une action constructive tendant vers des objectifs communs; créer, au sein des gouvernements, un dispositif permettant de repérer les tensions potentielles entre membres des communautés religieuses et de les dissiper, et de contribuer à la prévention des conflits et à la médiation; encourager les efforts des dirigeants pour discuter avec les membres de leur communauté des causes de la discrimination et des stratégies évolutives visant à y remédier; dénoncer l'intolérance, y compris l'appel à la haine religieuse qui constitue une incitation à la discrimination, à l'hostilité ou à la violence; et prendre des mesures pour incriminer l'incitation à la violence imminente fondée sur la religion ou les convictions. Le Conseil engage tous les États à prendre des mesures efficaces pour que, dans l'exercice de leurs fonctions, les agents publics n'exercent pas une discrimination à l'égard d'un individu en raison de sa religion ou de ses convictions; encourager la liberté religieuse et le pluralisme religieux en donnant aux membres de toutes les communautés religieuses la possibilité de manifester leur religion et de contribuer ouvertement à la société, dans des conditions d'égalité; encourager la représentation et la participation réelle de toutes les personnes, quelle que soit leur religion, dans tous les secteurs de la société; s'efforcer résolument de lutter contre le profilage religieux, compris comme l'utilisation odieuse de la religion comme critère pour la conduite d'interrogatoires, de fouilles et d'autres procédures d'enquête de la police. Le Conseil engage par ailleurs les États à adopter des mesures pour promouvoir le plein respect et la protection des lieux de culte et des sites religieux, des cimetières et des sanctuaires, et à prendre des mesures lorsque ces lieux risquent d'être vandalisés ou détruits.

    Le Conseil prie le Haut-Commissaire d'établir et de lui soumettre à sa session de mars 2016 un rapport complet présentant des conclusions détaillées se fondant sur les informations fournies par les États au sujet des initiatives et des mesures qu'ils prennent pour mettre en œuvre le plan d'action évoqué dans la résolution, ainsi que sur leurs vues concernant les mesures de suivi qui pourraient être prises pour améliorer encore la mise en œuvre de ce plan.

    Assistance technique et renforcement des capacités dans le domaine des droits de l'homme

    Par une résolution portant sur l'assistance technique et renforcement des capacités afin d'améliorer la situation des droits de l'homme en Libye (A/HRC/28/L.7 /Rev.1), adoptée sans vote, le Conseil prie le Haut-Commissaire aux droits de l'homme de dépêcher d'urgence une mission chargée d'enquêter sur les violations et les atteintes au droit international des droits de l'homme qui ont été commises en Libye depuis le début de 2014, et d'établir les faits et les circonstances de ces atteinte et violations, afin d'éviter l'impunité et d'assurer la pleine mise en cause des responsables. Le Haut-Commissaire soumettra au Conseil à sa session de mars 2016 un rapport écrit sur ses constatations, qui devrait en outre contenir des informations actualisées sur l'assistance technique, le renforcement des capacités et la coopération avec le Gouvernement libyen, ainsi que des recommandations relatives aux besoins futurs en matière de renforcement des capacités qui portent en particulier sur le système de justice et l'obligation de rendre compte.

    Le Conseil condamne toutes les violations et atteintes contre les droits de l'homme et toutes les violations du droit international humanitaire dans ce pays, notamment les homicides illégaux, les bombardements et les attaques sans distinction contre des civils. Le Conseil condamne dans les termes les plus forts les actes terroristes, les prises d'otages et les violences contre les civils perpétrés par le prétendu État islamique d'Iraq et du Levant (Daesh en Libye) et d'autres organisations terroristes, leur idéologie extrémiste violente et leurs violations flagrantes, systématiques, généralisées et persistantes des droits de l'homme. Il réaffirme que le terrorisme, y compris les actions du prétendu État islamique d'Iraq et du Levant, ne peuvent ni ne doivent être associés à une quelconque religion, nationalité ou civilisation.

    Le Conseil exhorte vigoureusement toutes les parties à mettre fin immédiatement aux violations et aux atteintes et à s'impliquer pleinement dans le dialogue pour la paix animé par l'ONU en vue de mettre en place un gouvernement d'unité nationale, afin d'éviter une nouvelle aggravation de la crise humanitaire que subissent les Libyens du fait du conflit et d'empêcher la poursuite de l'érosion de la souveraineté et de la sécurité de la Libye. Il exhorte tous les combattants et leurs chefs à déclarer que les violations et atteintes aux droits de l'homme ne seront pas tolérées et que les individus suspectés de tels actes seront démis de leurs fonctions. Conscient des problèmes auxquels la Libye est confrontée actuellement dans le domaine des droits de l'homme, le Conseil encourage vivement le Gouvernement libyen à amplifier ses efforts pour protéger et promouvoir les droits de l'homme et prévenir toute violation ou atteinte, et, à cet égard, appelle la communauté internationale à soutenir les efforts entrepris déployés par la Libye pour rétablir l'état de droit et garantir la régularité des procédures et l'accès à la justice.

    Par une autre résolution entérinée sans vote sur l'assistance technique et le renforcement des capacités en matière de droits de l'homme au Mali (A/HRC/28/L.9), le Conseil décide de proroger pour une période d'un an le mandat de l'Expert indépendant sur la situation des droits de l'homme au Mali, lui demandant de faire rapport au Conseil à sa session de mars 2016. Le Conseil demande au Haut-Commissaire de fournir une assistance technique au Gouvernement malien, notamment à la Commission dialogue, vérité, justice et réconciliation. Il prie instamment la communauté internationale de poursuivre son assistance au Mali pour assurer sa stabilité en vue de promouvoir le respect de tous les droits de l'homme et la lutte résolue contre l'impunité. Le Conseil réitère son appréciation pour l'assistance humanitaire déjà fournie aux populations affectées par la crise et demande instamment à la communauté internationale de continuer à apporter, en concertation avec le Gouvernement malien et les pays frontaliers concernés, une assistance humanitaire adéquate et sécurisée aux réfugiés et personnes déplacées, notamment dans le nord du Mali, en vue de faciliter l'accès des populations aux services sociaux de base et d'établir les conditions pour le redressement graduel du pays;

    Le Conseil condamne fermement les attaques armées et toutes les violences perpétrées au Mali, en particulier dans les régions du nord du pays, ainsi que les abus et les atteintes aux droits de l'homme et au droit international humanitaire, commis contre des populations civiles, notamment les femmes et les enfants, et l'enrôlement de ces derniers. Il réitère l'appel à un arrêt immédiat des abus et de toutes violations des droits de l'homme et des actes de violence ainsi qu'à un strict respect de tous les droits de l'homme et des libertés fondamentales, et prend note des efforts faits par le Gouvernement malien en vue de traduire devant une justice impartiale et indépendante tous les auteurs de violations des droits de l'homme, et de la poursuite de sa coopération avec la Cour pénale internationale.

    Aux termes d'une résolution intitulée «Assistance technique et renforcement des capacités en faveur des droits de l'homme en Iraq à la lumière des violations commises par Daesh et des groupes terroristes associés» (A/HRC/28/L.29 amendé), adoptée sans vote, le Conseil condamne dans les termes les plus énergiques possibles les atteintes systématiques, généralisées et graves aux droits de l'homme et les violations du droit international humanitaire commises par Daesh et des groupes terroristes associés, et condamne fermement en particulier toutes les violences perpétrées contre des personnes en raison de leur appartenance religieuse ou ethnique ainsi que les attaques menées contre la population civile, en particulier les femmes et les enfants.

    Le Conseil demande instamment au Gouvernement iraquien d'enquêter sur toutes les allégations d'atteintes aux droits de l'homme et de violations du droit international humanitaire. Il demande instamment à la communauté internationale d'aider l'Iraq à apporter une aide humanitaire aux personnes déplacées qui fuient les zones touchées par la violence, et à mettre en place des mesures visant à protéger les sites où se trouvent des charniers de personnes tuées par Daesh. Le Conseil demande enfin au Haut-Commissaire aux droits de l'homme de fournir au Gouvernement iraquien une assistance technique afin de l'aider à promouvoir et à protéger les droits de l'homme, et de lui faire un rapport écrit sur la question à sa session de septembre 2015.

    Par une résolution sur le renforcement de la coopération technique et des services consultatifs en Guinée (A/HRC/28/L.31/Rev.1 amendé), adoptée sans vote, le Conseil reconnaît les efforts accomplis par le Gouvernement guinéen pour renforcer l'état de droit et améliorer la situation des droits de l'homme dans le pays. Il appelle les autorités guinéennes à poursuivre leurs efforts pour consolider la liberté de réunion et d'association pacifiques et à rendre opérationnel le processus «justice, vérité et réconciliation». Le Conseil réitère fermement son attachement à l'accession au pouvoir par des voies démocratiques et appelle le Gouvernement guinéen à s'assurer que les élections qui seront organisées en 2015 se déroulent dans un cadre pacifique, transparent, de sécurité et respectant pleinement les droits de l'homme et les principes démocratiques.

    Le Conseil réitère fermement son appel à la communauté internationale à fournir au Gouvernement guinéen une assistance appropriée en vue de promouvoir le respect des droits de l'homme, la lutte contre l'impunité et les réformes des secteurs de la sécurité et de la justice, ainsi que les initiatives en cours en vue de promouvoir la vérité, la justice et la réconciliation nationale; à soutenir les efforts du Gouvernement guinéen dans la lutte contre la fièvre hémorragique à virus Ébola et pour le renforcement de son système de santé résilient; à soutenir le Bureau du Haut-Commissariat des Nations Unies aux droits de l'homme en Guinée; et à appuyer le Ministère des droits de l'homme et des libertés publiques pour la mise en œuvre de son Plan d'action. Le Conseil invite enfin le Haut-Commissaire à lui faire rapport, à sa session de mars 2016, sur l'évaluation de la situation des droits de l'homme et sur les activités du Bureau du Haut-Commissariat en Guinée.

    Par une déclaration du Président (A/HRC/28/L.37), également adoptée sans vote, le Conseil salue et entérine la demande des autorités haïtiennes de renouveler pour un an le mandat de l'Expert indépendant sur la situation des droits de l'homme en Haïti, qui s'inscrit dans le cadre de l'assistance technique et du renforcement des capacités. Le Conseil invite l'Expert indépendant à assister le Gouvernement d'Haïti dans la mise en œuvre de ses propres recommandations et de celles émises par les autres procédures spéciales et à présenter son rapport sur la situation des droits de l'homme en Haïti à la session de mars 2016 du Conseil des droits de l'homme.

    Le Conseil prend note des derniers développements juridiques et politiques en Haïti marqués notamment par des progrès en matière de droits civils et politiques, économiques, sociaux et culturels. Le Conseil salue l'installation, le 23 janvier 2015, d'un nouveau Conseil électoral provisoire, de même que la publication du décret électoral et du calendrier des élections par le Conseil électoral provisoire. Le Conseil encourage le Gouvernement d'Haïti à poursuivre le renforcement de l'État de droit, notamment au travers de la lutte contre l'impunité, la corruption, la criminalité et ses causes. Le Conseil encourage fortement le Gouvernement d'Haïti à continuer de renforcer les capacités de la police nationale et du système judiciaire, dans le but de garantir le fonctionnement des institutions et des services publics et la jouissance de tous les droits de l'homme. Le Conseil salue en particulier le lancement, en mars 2015, de l'opération «Coup de poing» qui vise à apporter une réponse urgente et structurée au phénomène de la détention préventive prolongée.

    Le Conseil encourage la communauté internationale dans son ensemble, en particulier les bailleurs de fonds internationaux, les États d'Amérique latine et des Caraïbes, les pays du groupe des amis d'Haïti et les institutions spécialisées des Nations Unies, et notamment le Haut-Commissariat aux droits de l'homme, à renforcer leur coopération et leur coordination avec les autorités haïtiennes.

    Promotion et protection de tous les droits de l'homme

    Par une résolution sur la prévention du génocide (A/HRC/28/L.25 amendé), le Conseil réaffirme l'importance de la Convention pour la prévention et la répression du crime de génocide et rappelle la responsabilité qu'a chaque État de protéger sa population contre le génocide, ce qui entraîne l'obligation de prévenir un tel crime, ainsi que l'incitation à le commettre, par les moyens nécessaires et appropriés. Le Conseil recommande à l'Assemblée générale de proclamer le 9 décembre «Journée internationale pour la mémoire et la dignité des victimes de génocide», afin de faire mieux connaître la Convention pour la prévention et la répression du crime de génocide et son rôle dans la lutte contre le génocide et la prévention de ce crime.

    Le Conseil reconnaît le rôle important du Secrétaire général, qui contribue à ce que soient examinés promptement les cas d'alerte rapide ou de prévention, selon le mandat à lui confié par le Conseil de sécurité dans sa résolution 1366 (2001), et des fonctions du Conseiller spécial pour la prévention du génocide qui recueille les renseignements existants, assure les relations avec le système des Nations Unies en ce qui concerne les activités de prévention du génocide et s'efforce d'améliorer la capacité de l'ONU d'analyser et de gérer toute l'information relative à des crimes de génocide ou à des infractions connexes. Le Conseil souligne le rôle important du système des droits de l'homme des Nations Unies, notamment du Conseil et le Haut-Commissariat aux droits de l'homme, des titulaires de mandat au titre des procédures spéciales et des organes conventionnels, qui rassemblent des informations sur les violations graves, massives et systématiques des droits de l'homme et contribuent ainsi à une meilleure compréhension des situations complexes qui peuvent donner lieu à un génocide et permettent de donner l'alerte rapidement.

    Le Conseil invite le Conseiller spécial à participer, à sa session de mars 2016, à un dialogue sur les progrès réalisés dans l'exécution de son mandat, et prie le Secrétaire général d'établir une liste des points de contact et des réseaux pour la prévention du génocide, à partir des renseignements actualisés provenant des États Membres.

    Les paragraphes 22 du préambule et 17 du dispositif ont été maintenus à l'issue d'un vote séparé par 28 voix contre 8, avec 11 abstentions.

    Des amendements au texte (A/HRC/28/L.38 et A/HRC/28/L.42) ont été rejetés à l'issue de votes (14 pour, 23 contre et 10 abstentions pour l'amendement L.38 et 15 pour 23 contre et 9 abstentions pour le L.42).

    Nominations de titulaires de mandats

    Le Conseil a entériné la nomination des quatre experts suivants en tant que titulaires de mandats au titre des procédures spéciales du Conseil:
    -M. Albert Kwokwo Barume, de la République démocratique du Congo, en tant que membre du Mécanisme d'experts sur les droits des peuples autochtones;
    -M. Idriss Jazairy, de l'Algérie, en tant que Rapporteur spécial sur les effets négatifs des mesures coercitives unilatérales sur l'exercice des droits de l'homme;
    -Mme Rhona Smith, du Royaume-Uni, en tant que Rapporteur spécial sur la situation des droits de l'homme au Cambodge;
    -M. Dante Pesce, du Chili, en tant que membre du Groupe de travail sur la question des droits de l'homme et des sociétés transnationales et autres entreprises.

    Examen des projets de résolution et de déclaration

    Suivi et application de la Déclaration et du Programme d'action de Vienne

    Présentant le projet de résolution sur la contribution à la session extraordinaire de l'Assemblée générale consacrée au problème mondial de la drogue prévue pour 2016 (A/HRC/28/L.22), la Colombie a dit que la compétence du Conseil des droits de l'homme pouvait enrichir le débat sur les questions relatives à la drogue. L'objet de la résolution n'est pas de rouvrir les débats sur le lien entre droits de l'homme et drogue, seulement de donner l'occasion de présenter les points de vue et d'échanger les expériences des uns et des autres. Ce texte présente un caractère équilibré, compte tenu des larges consultations dont il a bénéficié, a jouté é la Colombie, qui a appelé les membres du Conseil à l'examiner de manière positive et à l'adopter par consensus.

    La Fédération de Russie a déclaré que l'organe pertinent pour traiter des questions de drogues et autres stupéfiants était la Commission des stupéfiants des Nations Unies et son secrétariat. Tout autre effort visant à aborder cette question ailleurs qu'en son enceinte est contreproductive et non opportune. En ce domaine, l'approche «droits de l'homme» n'est pas la bonne. La délégation est également d'avis que demander au Haut-Commissariat de produire un rapport et tenir une discussion sur le sujet fait peser des frais et charges supplémentaires dont le Haut-Commissariat et le Conseil peuvent se passer.

    Les États-Unis se sont joints au consensus en dépit du coût de cette résolution qu'ils jugent élevé.

    Racisme, discrimination raciale, xénophobie et intolérance qui y est associée

    Présentant le projet de résolution sur la lutte contre l'intolérance, les stéréotypes négatifs, la stigmatisation, la discrimination, l'incitation à la violence et la violence visant certaines personnes en raison de leur religion ou de leurs convictions (A/HRC/28/L.4, amendé), le Pakistan, au nom de l'Organisation de la coopération islamique, a déclaré qu'il était un modèle de collaboration entre les États. Il est en effet essentiel que tous les États prennent ensemble toutes les mesures nécessaires pour prévenir l'intolérance religieuse. L'Organisation de la coopération islamique est en particulier préoccupée par le sort des minorités musulmanes toujours confrontées à des discriminations multiples dans la vie sociale et dans l'affirmation de leur foi. L'Organisation de la coopération islamique est aussi préoccupée par la montée de mouvements xénophobes et par l'institutionnalisation de la discrimination religieuse. Les musulmans doivent être traités sur un pied d'égalité, a insisté le Pakistan.

    La Sierra Leone a constaté que les groupes terroristes attisent volontiers l'intolérance religieuse pour leurs propres fins, suscitant des divisions jusqu'au sein de populations vivant auparavant dans l'harmonie. La Sierra Leone soutient le projet de résolution.

    La Lettonie, au nom de l'Union européenne, a regretté la violence et l'intolérance motivées par des motifs prétendument religieux et s'est dite consternée d'apprendre les pratiques odieuses associées à cette attitude. C'est pour cette raison que la communauté internationale doit s'unir autour de l'appel lancé par la résolution. Mais la lutte contre l'intolérance exige, outre les résolutions, que chacun prenne des mesures concrètes pour favoriser le respect mutuel. Il convient notamment de favoriser l'ensemble des droits civils et politiques, économiques, sociaux et culturels. Le plan d'action mentionné dans la résolution est utile à cet égard, estime l'Union européenne.

    L'Indonésie, plus grand pays musulman au monde, s'est félicitée de la présentation de ce projet, qui arrive à un point nommé et qui permettra de lutter contre la violence et l'intolérance religieuse. Le plan d'action auquel fait référence ce texte est un bon début qui pourra être complété ou renforcé par la suite. Dans ce contexte l'Indonésie espère que le texte bénéficiera d'un consensus.

    Assistance technique et renforcement des capacités dans le domaine des droits de l'homme

    Présentant la résolution portant sur l'assistance technique et renforcement des capacités afin d'améliorer la situation des droits de l'homme en Libye (A/HRC/28/L.7/Rev.1), l'Algérie, au nom du Groupe africain, a estimé que ce document arrivait à un moment crucial. Il s'agit d'une mise à jour de la résolution de l'an dernier, tenant compte des évolutions récentes sur le terrain et des nouvelles informations apportées par le rapport du Haut-Commissariat. Le texte propose donc, entre autres, au Haut-Commissariat d'envoyer une Commission d'enquête sur place, en coopération avec la Mission d'appui des Nations Unies en Libye (MANUL) et les autorités sur place. Il propose aussi la tenue d'un débat interactif avec la présence du Représentant du Secrétaire général en Libye. Compte tenu des larges consultations dont a joui le texte, le Groupe africain demande une adoption par consensus.

    La Lettonie, au nom de l'Union européenne, a appuyé le projet de résolution sur la Libye, très préoccupée par la situation très grave qui prévaut dans ce pays. L'Union européenne soutient la mission qui y sera envoyée et insiste sur l'importance, pour l'établissement d'une paix durable, de la responsabilisation de chacun. L'Union européenne appuie en particulier la référence à la Cour pénale internationale.

    La Fédération de Russie a dit appuyer le peuple libyen, qui traverse des temps difficiles sans qu'il n'en soit responsable. Elle regrette toutefois que la résolution ne mentionne pas les problèmes antérieurs qui expliquent la montée du terrorisme. Elle place de grands espoirs dans l'instauration d'un dialogue national entre les Libyens, qui doivent s'unir.

    La Libye, en tant que pays concerné, a remercié le Groupe africain de son initiative dans le domaine de l'assistance pour les droits de l'homme. Par souci de transparence, la Libye a voulu que le projet reflète ses difficultés et favorise l'union nationale contre le terrorisme dans le contexte des atteintes graves et quotidiennes aux droits de l'homme commises par «Daech», au sujet desquelles le Haut-Commissariat doit dépêcher une mission d'enquête. La Libye salue les efforts internationaux consentis pour favoriser le dialogue national dans le pays en Libye et assurer la transmission pacifique du pouvoir.

    Présentant le projet de résolution sur l'assistance technique et renforcement des capacités en matière de droits de l'homme au Mali (A/HRC/28/L.9), l'Algérie, au nom du Groupe africain, a indiqué que ce texte est la quatrième résolution adoptée par le Conseil sur le Mali. Son but est de prolonger pour un an supplémentaire le mandat de l'Expert indépendant sur le Mali. Il reprend les mêmes dispositions que les autres résolutions, tout en tenant compte des évolutions sur le terrain, notamment les mesures prises par les autorités maliennes dans le domaine des droits de l'homme, la signature de l'accord de paix d'Alger, les efforts déployés par les partenaires locaux et internationaux et l'assistance technique dont a bénéficié le pays. Compte tenu des larges consultations menées, le Groupe africain demande un consensus sur le projet.

    La Lettonie, au nom de l'Union européenne, s'est félicitée de l'adoption par consensus de la résolution sur l'assistance technique au Mali dans le domaine des droits de l'homme. Elle a salué l'engagement des autorités à cet égard, mais s'est dite préoccupée par les risques potentiels induits par une situation sécuritaire instable. Les autorités maliennes doivent en particulier éviter que la vengeance ne vienne remplacer la justice et la lutte contre l'impunité, deux démarches indispensables. L'Union européenne soutient pleinement le rôle de l'Expert indépendant auprès des autorités du Mali dans la situation actuelle.

    Présentant le projet de résolution intitulé «Assistance technique et renforcement des capacités en faveur des droits de l'homme en Iraq à la lumière des violations commises par «Daech» et des groupes terroristes associés» (A/HRC/28/L.29), l'Iraq s'est dit profondément préoccupé par les violations des droits de l'homme abjectes dont sa population est victime des mains des terroristes de «Daech». Cette situation ne concerne pas uniquement l'Iraq mais bien l'ensemble de la communauté internationale.

    Les États-Unis se sont dits très préoccupés par les atrocités commises par «Daech» contre le peuple iraquien, qui pourraient constituer des crimes contre l'humanité, voire un génocide. Les États-Unis estiment que des efforts de stabilisation doivent permettre d'assurer la protection de la population civile et saluent les appels lancés en ce sens par les autorités religieuses en Iraq. Les États-Unis continueront d'aider le Gouvernement iraquien à remédier à toutes les violations des droits de l'homme, quels qu'en soient les auteurs.

    La France a accusé «Daech» de continuer son œuvre sinistre de destruction des biens culturels et de l'humanité en Iraq. C'est pourquoi la France soutient ce projet de résolution, qui vise à lutter contre l'impunité. La France est également d'avis qu'il revient au gouvernement de l'Iraq d'agir avec la diligence nécessaire concernant les allégations de violations des droits de l'homme commises par son armée et les groupes affilées.

    La Lettonie au nom de l'Union européenne a déclaré que les crimes commis par «Daech» relèvent du crime contre l'humanité. Tous ces crimes exigent des enquêtes et le gouvernement iraquien est responsable de celles-ci. La Lettonie et les autres États membres de l'Union européenne membres du Conseil se joignent au consensus.

    Le Brésil appuie le texte, étant donné les actes terroristes commis par «Daech» et le devoir de la communauté internationale d'aider l'Iraq et son peuple. Mais le Brésil déplore que la résolution ne traite pas de la responsabilité des acteurs qui luttent contre «Daech» et qui doivent eux aussi respecter le droit international. Eux aussi devront répondre de leurs actes devant la justice.

    Présentant le projet de résolution sur le renforcement de la coopération technique et des services consultatifs en Guinée (A/HRC/28/L.31/Rev.1), l'Algérie, au nom du Groupe africain, a indiqué qu'il reflète les progrès réalisés par la Guinée dans le domaine des droits de l'homme, notamment le lancement du processus électoral en vue du prochain scrutin. Le projet demande également aux autorités guinéennes de donner une réponse judiciaire complète aux événements de septembre 2009.

    La Lettonie, au nom de l'Union européenne, s'est félicitée de l'adoption par consensus de cette résolution, un texte de qualité qui reflète le consensus qui s'est dégagé au cours des négociations. L'Union européenne souligne que le projet demande aux autorités de redoubler d'efforts pour lever l'impunité des auteurs des massacres de septembre 2009. L'Union européenne estime qu'il est important de garder la Guinée à l'ordre du jour du Conseil.

    La Guinée, en tant que pays concerné, a remercié les pays amis qui ont soutenu le projet de résolution. La Guinée entend poursuivre son action pour donner effet aux droits de l'homme, en collaboration avec ses partenaires internationaux. Elle apprécie le soutien que lui accorde la communauté internationale pour ce faire. La Guinée intensifiera ses réformes dans tous les domaines, en particulier la justice transitionnelle, l'instauration d'un État de droit effectif, la lutte contre toutes les formes de violence, notamment envers les femmes et les filles, et pour rendre justice aux victimes des événements du 28 septembre 2009. La Guinée veillera en particulier à ce que ses forces de sécurité soient soumises à un contrôle démocratique.

    Suite à l'adoption de la déclaration du Président sur la situation des droits de l'homme en Haïti, Haïti s'est félicité du consensus sur ce texte et a assuré que son gouvernement avait pris des engagements en faveur de la tenue prochaine d'élections, saines et démocratiques. Il a salué l'implication des partenaires bilatéraux et internationaux.

    La France, intervenant au nom du groupe des amis d'Haïti, s'est félicitée de l'engagement renouvelé d'Haïti. Elle s'est aussi félicitée de la qualité de la coopération entre les autorités haïtiennes et l'expert indépendant, M. Gallon. La France reconnaît la qualité de son travail. Elle réaffirme sa solidarité aux côtés d'Haïti pour consolider la démocratie et l'état de droit.

    Intervenant après l'adoption de ces textes, le Gabon, au nom du groupe des pays francophones, a souligné que la francophonie prendrait toute sa part dans l'assistance à l'organisation des élections en Haïti. S'agissant du Mali, il s'est félicité de l'entente parvenue sur le renforcement des structures de l'État. Le groupe francophone engage instamment la communauté internationale à poursuivre son assistance au Mali. Il invite les parties signataires du pré-accord d'Alger à l'entériner et à le mettre en œuvre au plus tôt. Il appelle par ailleurs la communauté internationale à fournir au gouvernement guinéen une assistance appropriée.

    Promotion et protection de tous les droits de l'homme

    Présentant un projet de résolution sur la prévention du génocide (A/HRC/28/L.25), l'Arménie a exprimé l'espoir que le texte serait adopté par consensus. Il s'agit en effet de parvenir à la mise en œuvre effective pour l'application et la mise en œuvre concrète de la Convention sur le crime de génocide. Le texte évoque les nouveaux défis auxquels fait face à la communauté internationale. Il souligne les dangers de nier purement et simplement la commission de tels crimes. Il suggère de renforcer la coopération dans la prévention et la rendre plus efficace. Il propose de décréter une Journée internationale pour la prévention du crime de génocide. Il s'agit d'un défi majeur qui nous concerne tous et doit tous nous réunir. L'Arménie a dit s'être efforcée de concilier les divers points de vue. Elle a regretté le dépôt d'amendements visant à affaiblir le texte. Il s'agit au bout du compte d'adresser un message fort de la communauté internationale. L'Arménie, qui entend montrer sa bonne volonté, a proposé une ultime version du texte afin de lever les dernières réticences. Elle a exprimé l'espoir que ces modifications seraient appréciées à leur juste valeur. Elle a remercié les 64 auteurs de ce texte.

    Le Rwanda a souligné le rôle important joué par les réflexions qui ont été menées sur la mise en place d'un mécanisme d'alerte précoce. Il a déploré le dépôt d'amendements hostiles tout en notant l'esprit de souplesse dont avait fait preuve l'Arménie.

    Cuba a fait part de ses fortes réserves sur la notion de «responsabilité de protéger», notion pouvant permettre de justifier n'importe quelle intervention militaire, particulièrement dans des pays en développement. Cuba recommande l'adoption de l'amendement figurant dans le document A/HRC/28/L.38.

    Déclarations par des membres et observateurs du Conseil sur l'ensemble des textes adoptés

    La Tunisie a fait une déclaration au nom de 51 États pour réitérer le ferme appui de ceux-ci à l'indépendance du Haut-Commissariat aux droits de l'homme. L'indépendance est en effet essentielle pour que le Haut-Commissaire puisse s'acquitter de son mandat comme il convient. La Tunisie a rappelé que le Haut-Commissariat demeurait sous la direction et l'autorité administrative du Secrétaire général et ce, même s'il est chargé du Secrétariat du Conseil des droits de l'homme et de ses mécanismes. Le rapport du Corps commun d'inspection empiète cette indépendance, notamment dans la section sur l'examen de la gouvernance et du contrôle.

    La Suisse a fait une déclaration relative à plusieurs résolutions, notamment L.29 et L.30, relatives à l'assistance technique à l'Iraq en relation avec la situation des droits de l'homme à la lumière des activités de «Daech» et aux effets du terrorisme sur la jouissance des droits de l'homme. Elle a rappelé que toutes les parties au conflit en Iraq répondent de leurs actes et est déçue que le texte de résolution L.29 ne traite pas de toutes les parties au conflit, y compris les forces de sécurité iraquiennes et groupes armés affiliés. La Suisse aurait également aimé voir la résolution appeler le Gouvernement iraquien à mettre en œuvre les recommandations qui y sont contenues et à veiller à ce que tous les auteurs des violations des droits de l'homme alléguées soient traduits en justice. Elle aurait aussi souhaité que le mandat du Haut-Commissariat, y compris celui d'enquêter sur ces allégations, fût prolongé. S'agissant de la résolution L.30, la Suisse estime que la Stratégie antiterroriste mondiale de l'ONU et ses quatre piliers sont essentiels pour la lutte contre le terrorisme. Il a noté que la résolution ne se concentre que sur une seule thématique.

    L'Égypte a fait part de son accord avec plusieurs délégations sur la prévention du génocide. S'agissant de la résolution sur les droits de l'enfant, elle se dissocie du paragraphe 13 mentionnant une éducation sexuelle basée sur des faits. S'agissant de la résolution sur le droit à la vie privée dans l'ère numérique, elle suivra de très près le travail du nouveau Rapporteur spécial et veillera à ce que le mandat n'empiète pas sur d'autres déjà existants.

    L'Australie s'est félicitée de l'adoption de la résolution sur la situation des droits de l'homme en République populaire démocratique de Corée, estimant nécessaire que la communauté internationale continue de suivre une situation particulièrement préoccupante.

    Le Costa Rica s'est exprimé au sujet de la résolution relative à la composition du Haut-Commissariat se disant attaché à la diversité géographique de son personnel. Il estime toutefois que ce n'est pas aux États de jouer un rôle de conseil d'administration, au risque de porter atteinte à l'indépendance de l'institution. Le Corps commun d'inspection doit jouer son rôle et ne pas s'appuyer sur des critères politiques dans ses audits.

    Le Canada a salué la résolution concernant l'enregistrement des naissances et annoncé qu'il fournirait 500 millions de dollars à cet effet. La résolution sur le droit à la vie privée est d'une importance cruciale. Il reconnaît par ailleurs les atteintes aux droits de l'homme des personnes atteintes d'albinisme et se dit prêt à coopérer avec l'Expert indépendant. D'autre part, le Canada considère les conclusions faisant étant de nouveaux crimes de guerre en Syrie comme très préoccupantes.

    L'Arménie a appuyé la déclaration du Président sur le soixante-dixième anniversaire de la fin de la Seconde guerre mondiale et encouragé à l'établissement de rapports amicaux entre les peuples.

    L'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie (OIF) a salué l'adoption de textes de grande importance pour l'espace francophone. Elle se félicite notamment de la résolution sur l'assistance technique au Mali, de la Déclaration du président sur la situation des droits de l'homme en Haïti et des résolutions sur le renforcement de la coopération technique et des services consultatifs en Guinée et sur les droits de l'homme des personnes atteintes d'albinisme. L'OIF rappelle son attachement au multilinguisme et invite le Conseil et le Secrétariat à faire davantage d'efforts à cet égard.

    La République islamique d'Iran a noté que la résolution sur le génocide précise les obligations des États et s'est dissociée des paragraphes contenant le principe de «responsabilité de protéger».

    L'organisation non gouvernementale Association of World Citizens a appelé à ce que les stagiaires œuvrant au sein du Haut-Commissariat soient pris en compte dans la notion de «personnel». Leur travail est incommensurable, a noté l'ONG. Leurs émoluments ne permettant pas de faire face aux dépenses, un montant mensuel de 2500 francs suisses par stagiaire est réclamé par les organisations non gouvernementales prenant en charge ces jeunes talentueux, susceptibles de s'intégrer plus tard au travail des Nations Unies.

    Le Service international pour les droits de l'homme, au nom de plusieurs autres organisations non gouvernementales1, a déploré un échec de la communauté internationale à traiter correctement les situations graves des droits de l'homme. IHRS regrette que la résolution sur l'Iraq ne rende pas justice à la situation et qu'elle n'exige pas la fin de l'impunité pour toutes les parties. De même, le renouvellement du mandat du Rapporteur spécial pour le Myanmar est, certes, une bonne chose mais la résolution omet de condamner l'actuelle répression contre les étudiants. L'IHSR a aussi signalé d'autres importantes omissions telles que l'étouffement de la société civile en Égypte ou la répression massive contre les défenseurs des droits de l'homme en Azerbaïdjan. Le Conseil n'a pas non pris de position ferme face aux violations des droits de l'homme en Ukraine. Sur le plan thématique, les organisations non gouvernementales estiment que la résolution sur l'impact du terrorisme omet de reconnaître le rôle de la société civile dans la lutte contre le terrorisme. Malgré ces lacunes, elles reconnaissent aussi des avancées lors de cette session, en particulier la création d'un nouveau mandat sur le droit à la vie privée. Elles apprécient aussi le renouvellement des mandats sur l'alimentation et les droits culturels, ainsi que le nouveau texte sur les politiques vis à vis des stupéfiants.

    Déclaration de clôture

    M. JOACHIM RÜCKER, Président du Conseil, a appelé les États, les représentants de la société civile, tous ceux qui participent aux travaux du Conseil, à continuer d'aborder toutes les questions dont le Conseil est saisi avec la dignité et le respect qui s'imposent. S'il est encourageant de constater que de nombreux États jouent un rôle actif et positif dans le soutien aux organisations non gouvernementales et aux défenseurs des droits de l'homme, il y a encore loin de la coupe aux lèvres, a-t-il déploré. M. Rücker s'est dit en effet «à la fois alarmé et attristé» par les nombreux cas d'intimidation et d'attaques contre les militants qui entendent coopérer avec le Conseil des droits de l'homme.

    1. Déclaration conjointe: Service international pour les droits de l'homme, Forum asiatique pour les droits de l'homme et le développement, Human Rights Watch, Fédération internationale des ligues des droits de l'homme (FIDH), Fondation de la Maison des droits de l'homme, et CIVICUS: Alliance mondiale pour la participation des citoyens.

    Ce document est destiné à l'information; il ne constitue pas un document officiel


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    Source: World Vision
    Country: Niger

    World Vision created a resource center for hand pump maintenance in 2011 to overcome the recurring spare parts accessibility problem in Dan Goulbi municipality located in Kornaka West ADP. Today the center has repair artisans organized in network that work in collaboration with the municipality.

    The resource center opened in 2011 with a management committee formed and trained for an effective management. The Management Committee is composed of six members, including a chairman, a treasurer, a secretary general, a manager and two commissioners elected democratically by the community.

    Only the manager receives a bonus of 10% of the earnings, and the remaining members are volunteers. This committee functions under the authority of the municipal council. The committee currently has a bank balance of 871,296 CFA.

    “We are very proud of the management system put in place in the resource center, we feel more responsible and helpful. We believe other municipalities can learn a lot from us,” says Mallam Koini DJika is the resource center manager responsible for selling spare parts.

    Since the opening the resource center to date there has been a significant decrease in hand pump break down and in spare parts purchase.

    In the past, we had travel long distances, 107 km to Maradi or 357 km to Zinder to buy one or more parts for a pump. Subsequently the period of repaired was very long too, leaving community members waiting for weeks and months.

    Our local resource center ensures the functionality of our hand pumps in a sustainable way thereby making continuous safe water supply in our communities.

    “On behalf of the whole community of Dan Goulbi I want to say thanks for World Vision Niger for providing the resource center and for helping us with tools for its effective management.”

    Makaou Garba, WASH facilitator


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    Source: Government of Ireland
    Country: Cameroon, Ireland, Nigeria

    Ireland to send 87 tonnes of emergency supplies to assist families displaced by conflict in Nigeria

    Ireland is today dispatching thousands of blankets, tents, cooking kits, jerry cans, and other urgent supplies to assist thousands of Nigerian refugees in Northern Cameroon. The announcement was made by the Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade, Charlie Flanagan, TD, and Minister of State for Development, Trade Promotion and North South Co-operation, Seán Sherlock, TD.

    Over 87 tonnes of Irish stocks will provide relief to thousands of vulnerable families that have recently sought refuge in Northern Cameroon, fleeing the conflict between military forces and the Nigerian militant group, Boko Haram in north-eastern Nigeria.

    The airlift, worth around €900,000, will be sent this weekend from the UN Humanitarian Response Depot in Accra, Ghana, where Irish Aid pre-positions supplies for use in global emergencies.

    Announcing the airlift, Minister Flanagan said:

    “I am gravely concerned about the serious security situation in north-eastern Nigeria and that large parts of the Nigerian border with Cameroon, Niger and Chad have fallen under Boko Haram’s control. Their attacks have driven people from their homes and it is estimated that 1.5 million people have been displaced internally within Nigeria and that over 150,000 people have fled to the neighbouring countries of Cameroon, Niger and Chad.

    “As the brutal actions of this group continue to spread beyond its borders into neighbouring countries, Boko Haram now represents a threat to the peace and security of the whole region. This is a particularly difficult time, given today’s elections in Nigeria.

    “This weekend’s airlift will provide vital supplies to the most vulnerable people; including tents, blankets, mosquito nets, kitchen sets, and tarpaulins, as well as water supply and sanitation equipment.”

    Minister Seán Sherlock said:

    “The living conditions for Nigerian refugees in Minawao camp are dire. There is an inadequate supply of water, a severe lack of hygiene items and an urgent need to construct latrines and boreholes. With the onset of the rainy season next month, the refugee population is extremely vulnerable to a cholera outbreak.

    “Between 28 February and 1 March, a two day period, 16,000 new Nigerian refugees arrived in the area and are now being transferred from the border into the already over-crowded camp. About 70 per cent of these new arrivals are women and children.

    “The continuing large-scale influx of refugees requires increased and urgent humanitarian assistance to protect vulnerable families and meet their basic needs.”

    The emergency stocks will be distributed by Ireland’s NGO partner, Plan, in the Minawao refugee camp in Northern Cameroon.


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Malawi, Mozambique, United Republic of Tanzania, Zimbabwe

    Regional Overview

    Regional

    In Mozambique, 437 new cholera cases were reported since 19 March, which is a significant decrease from 843 new cases the previous week. All provinces registered a decrease in new cases between 22 and 25 March. The response is ongoing. In Malawi, 24 new cholera cases were reported over the week, which is a significant decrease from the previous week which saw 57 new cases. However, 1 new cholera death was reported in Nsanje District, and a new district (Ntcheau) affected, where 1 case was confirmed.

    Response activities continue. The first round of the Oral Cholera Vaccine Campaign is expected to start in Nsanje District from 31 March until 3 April 2015. In Zimbabwe, 2 new cases have been confirmed in Chiredzi District, bringing the total number to 15 with no deaths since the first confirmed case in late February 2015. No new cases have been reported in Beitbridge since 9 March 2015. Monitoring and response is ongoing.

    Madagascar

    Following recent floods around the capital, most of the ad hoc displacement sites are closing down as people return home, apart from the consolidated Government-run Andohatapenaka camp, where 3,719 people remain and where response efforts are focused.

    Malawi

    WFP urgently requires US$12.4 million to meet a significant increase in the food security needs of flood-affected households, and to extend humanitarian assistance to other vulnerable households receiving lean season food assistance (via the Malawi Vulnerability Assessment Committee response). US$8.9 million is required to provide life-saving food assistance to all 616,000 food insecure floods-affected people and some US$3.5 million is required to extend food and cash assistance by one month under the MVAC response.

    Tanzania

    Localized heavy rains last week combined with blocked waterways and poor drainage systems have led to flooding in some areas of Dar es Salaam.


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    Source: International Peace Institute
    Country: Burundi, Egypt, Kenya, Mali, World, Zimbabwe

    by Andrea OSúilleabháin, editor

    The call for national and local ownership of peacebuilding and statebuilding design and practice has grown louder in recent years. The principles of leveraging local knowledge and attending to local context have gained increasing prominence and visibility in international policy. Yet translating these principles into practice—in terms of peacebuilding and statebuilding mechanisms, processes, and programs on the ground—is an enduring challenge for the United Nations and international actors.

    This new report highlights examples of innovative peacebuilding and statebuilding in communities across Africa. Five case studies illustrate the innovative work of local actors, their interaction with national actors and policies, and their challenges and opportunities in linking local knowledge to international policy and practice. The case studies include women’s statebuilding initiatives in Egypt; youth-centered peacebuilding programs in Burundi; efforts to build local governance in the face of transnational organized crime in Mali; violence transformation training in Zimbabwe; and the use of online and mobile technologies to counter election violence in Kenya.

    Lessons from these cases point to seven recommendations for those seeking to use local knowledge to advance peacebuilding and statebuilding:

    1. Define and redefine the “local,” which needs to be negotiated and revisited in each individual context and community.
    2. View local knowledge as an existing capacity and an ongoing resource, by thoroughly mapping peace resources and networks in local communities.
    3. Bridge the divide between local and national, by creating channels and opportunities for communication between local communities and national policymakers.
    4. Do not presume legitimate representation. International actors often focus on elite groups in national capitals, which inhibits deeper buy-in for projects implemented in communities without consultation on priorities and program design.
    5. Accept that peace takes time, and plan accordingly. The transformation needed to bring inclusive governance and sustainable peace to conflict-affected countries requires long-term commitments.
    6. Measure the impact of local knowledge. More research is needed to show how incorporating local ideas and community priorities leads to success.
    7. Operationalize local engagement and national ownership through specific strategies and tactics, and use planning mechanisms that formally take local knowledge into account.

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    Source: UN Security Council
    Country: Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria

    SC/11845

    7421st Meeting (AM)
    Security Council
    Meetings Coverage

    Unless well-targeted humanitarian assistance reached those fleeing Boko Haram’s increasingly brutal attacks, more than 3 million people in northern Nigeria would be unable to meet basic food needs in the coming months and millions more would be affected, top United Nations officials said, briefing the Security Council on threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts.

    The situation in Nigeria and neighbouring States remained dire and urgent, with insecurity and a lack of donor support constraining the expansion of a humanitarian “footprint”, said Kyung-Wha Kang, Assistant Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator, speaking on behalf of Valerie Amos, Under-Secretary-General and Emergency Relief Coordinator.

    The number of people fleeing attacks was growing across borders in the Lake Chad Basin region, she said. With the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees reporting more than 200,000 displaced persons in Cameroon, Chad and Niger, she said the three Governments had requested international aid to respond to immediate needs, including protection, food, water and shelter. Food was becoming increasingly scarce and costly, with almost one quarter of children in the Diffa region between 6 and 23 months of age were suffering from acute malnutrition and 4.6 million in north-east Nigeria were facing food insecurity.

    An overwhelming number of internally displaced persons resided in host communities in “camp-like” conditions, clustered around schools, churches and mosques, she went on. The International Organization for Migration reported that only 10 per cent of the more than 1 million displaced persons were in Government-run camps in urban areas. While authorities had worked hard to meet the needs of those fleeing the violence, the humanitarian response in north-east Nigeria was “overall poor and fragmented”. The Boko Haram crisis was also likely to affect the Sahel region, as Nigeria produced half its cereals.

    Welcoming the regional political commitment to tackle the ongoing violence, she underscored the importance of a limited focus by the Multi-National Joint Task Force to create conducive security conditions and avoid civilian casualties. As the Force was a party to conflict, she asked Council members to ensure that operations remained distinct from civilian-led humanitarian efforts to safeguard the neutrality of those providing aid.

    After the Inter-Agency Standing Committee visited Nigeria in early March, a three-month action plan was developed to support scaling up critical assistance and life-saving response efforts in conflict-affected areas, she continued. On 15 March, the Emergency Relief Coordinator approved $28 million from the United Nations Emergency Response Fund, but more funding was needed, she said, hoping for bolstered support from the international community.

    Elaborating via videoconference on recent developments as Boko Haram’s “wrath” spread across borders, Mohammad Ibn Chambas, Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of the United Nations Office for West Africa, said it was clear that a military approach alone would not suffice to contain the threat. Although several key towns had been recaptured, as well as Boko Haram’s headquarters, and the terrorist group held only a few areas, its attacks had intensified.

    A recent report of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), he noted, showed that Boko Haram had committed numerous human rights abuses, including abductions, looting and slaughtering of communities. Following an attack in February, reports had shown that the armed group was forcibly recruiting boys and men. Of particular concern were children, who had been targeted for abduction and forced recruitment, with reports of young people being used as suicide bombers.

    In response to those and other concerns, the United Nations was in the process of scaling up its presence and operations in Niger, Cameroon and the Lake Chad Basin region, he said. A hands-on approach was needed, as were resources for implementation, he said, noting that the United Nations would support regional efforts, including those led by the Lake Chad Basin Commission.

    However, proceeding cautiously was essential, he said. Counter-terrorist operations that were perceived by affected populations as being brutal would violate the norms represented by the United Nations. A joint task force must abide by the rule of law and international standards, which was an effective strategy to ensure that communities supported the authorities fighting Boko Haram instead of fostering the insurgents.

    In light of recent elections in Nigeria, which the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) reported as having been free and transparent, he said, the legitimacy of the next Government would be essential for the country’s long-term stability. He hoped that Government would remain engaged in the fight against Boko Haram.

    As for the role of the international community, he said it could and should play an important part in addressing the root causes of terrorism in a way that put respect for human life and dignity first.

    The meeting began at 10:07 a.m. and ended at 10:33 a.m.

    For information media. Not an official record.


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Niger, Nigeria

    Highlights

    • The Nigerien Government launched an emergency plan1 of 45 billion CFA francs (about US$72 million)2 to respond to Diffa’s humanitarian crisis. The plan targets 363,200 people between 25 March and 31 December 2015.

    • Regional authorities and humanitarian actors conducted a rapid needs assessment following last month’s attacks in Bosso and Diffa. Food and water are urgently needed.

    • On 24 February, the Government placed the state of emergency in Diffa region on hold for three months.

    • UNICEF Regional Director and WFP Regional Director respectively visited Diffa on 6 and 11 March.

    Situation Overview

    More than one month after the Bosso and Diffa3 attacks, the humanitarian situation remains extremely volatile in the region. On 24 February, the Nigerien Government announced that the state of emergency declaration is on hold for three months in order to restore the security stability.

    The improved situation in recent weeks has resulted in a gradual return to normal life in certain areas, notably Diffa town, where markets and basic social service have resumed. Internally displaced persons (IDPs) are returning, but no quantitative data is currently available.

    Humanitarian actors continue their interventions despite access difficulties, especially in the areas surrounding Lake Chad. Regional authorities and humanitarian partners carried out a rapid needs assessment in 10 villages to assess the changes in the context following the February attack. As part of this evaluation, 1,369 households (8,850 people) were identified,4 475 of whom (3,742 people) were interviewed. The findings of the assessment revealed that access to water and food were people’s primary needs. Shelter and non-food items were also identified as urgent needs.

    On 17 March, the Prime Minister of Niger launched an emergency plan of 45 billion CFA francs (about $72 billion) to assist and protect displaced people from Nigeria, IDPs and vulnerable host community members. This plan will cover March to December 2015. During the launch, humanitarian actors reiterated their commitment to support the Government’s efforts


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    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Nigeria

    Abuja, Nigeria | | Monday 3/30/2015 22:57 GMT

    by Ola AWONIYI with Joel Olatunde AGOI in Port Harcourt

    Opposition leader Muhammadu Buhari had a slender lead over President Goodluck Jonathan in Nigeria's knife-edge general election on Monday with just over half of all states declared.

    The tense presidential vote pitting Jonathan against the former military ruler Buhari is the closest in Nigeria's history, and the first with a credible opposition challenge.

    International observers gave broadly positive reactions to the conduct of the vote, despite late delivery of election materials and technical glitches with new voter authentication devices.

    Nigeria's Transition Monitoring Group, which had observers across the country, said: "These issues did not systematically disadvantage any candidate or party."

    Buhari and his All Progressives Congress (APC) had won 10 states, with Jonathan, of the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) taking eight plus the Federal Capital Territory of Abuja.

    The 72-year-old defeated Jonathan by nearly 1.7 million votes in the key northern state of Kano, which has been among the hardest hit by Boko Haram violence, and he took similar leads in Katsina and Kaduna.

    But the 57-year-old president clawed back ground in his traditional stronghold, winning massively in southeastern states as well as the religiously mixed central state of Plateau.

    Buhari had so far won just over 8.5 million votes, about two million ahead of Jonathan with populous states such as Lagos and Rivers yet to declare.

    Announcement of results was adjourned until 0900 GMT on Tuesday.

    - US, UK warning -

    The PDP and the APC on Sunday traded allegations of vote rigging and other irregularities, raising the possibility of a legal challenge to the results.

    Violence has often flared in previous Nigerian votes after the winner is announced and the United States and Britain warned against any "interference" with the count.

    "So far, we have seen no evidence of systemic manipulation of the process," US Secretary of State John Kerry and British foreign minister Philip Hammond said in a joint statement.

    "But there are disturbing indications that the collation process -- where the votes are finally counted -- may be subject to deliberate political interference."

    Kayode Idowu, spokesman for the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC), told AFP that there was "no evidence of political interference".

    Jonathan's campaign spokesman Femi Fani-Kayode told reporters in Abuja that the claims were "absolutely balderdash" and challenged Kerry and any other foreign powers to provide evidence.

    - Fears, curfew -

    Nigeria's central Kaduna state, one of the areas worst-affected by violence four years ago when some 1,000 people were killed in post-election clashes, was said to be calm.

    Awwal Abdullahi Aliyu, president of the Northern People Unity and Reconciliation Union, welcomed positive statements from foreign observers about the conduct of the election.

    But he warned that places such as Kaduna remained a powderkeg and could "catch fire", particularly if electoral fraud is suspected in any ruling party victory.

    Some 2,000 women protesting against the conduct of the elections were teargassed as they tried to converge on the local electoral commission offices in the southern oil city of Port Harcourt.

    The protest over alleged vote rigging by the PDP -- and a counter-protest demanding the results hold -- forced the Rivers state government to impose an overnight curfew.

    The electoral commission is investigating the claims of electoral fraud.

    - Call for calm -

    Jonathan's PDP has been in power since Nigeria returned to civilian rule in 1999 but is being pushed to the wire by Buhari.

    The prospect of a democratic transfer of power -- plus economic woes caused by the slump in global oil prices, concerns about corruption and fears about insecurity -- energised the vote.

    The winning presidential candidate needs not just the most votes but at least 25 percent support in two-thirds of Nigeria's 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory to avoid a run-off.

    Voting was pushed into an unscheduled second day Sunday after failures in controversial new technology designed to read biometric identity cards to combat electoral fraud.

    Among those affected by the technical hitches was the president himself.

    Some 348 polling stations had to open again on Sunday to complete the vote, for which 68.8 million people are registered out of Nigeria's population of 173 million.

    But election chief Attahiru Jega said the number of affected devices was minimal and the commission was confident of meeting its goal of a "free, fair, credible and peaceful" election.

    "We appeal to all Nigerians to remain peaceful as they await the return of these results," he told a news conference on Sunday.

    - Deadly attacks -

    Boko Haram has dominated the campaign, with military operations against the Islamist militants forcing a six-week delay to the scheduled February 14 election.

    On Sunday, residents and a military source said soldiers supported by two fighter jets had intercepted militants at Dungulbe village, seven kilometres (four miles) from Bauchi city in the northeast.

    A spokesman for the Bauchi state governor said a round-the-clock curfew had been imposed on three areas because of the fighting.

    A series of attacks on polling stations in neighbouring Gombe state on Saturday killed at least seven.

    Boko Haram leader Abubakar Shekau had vowed to disrupt the election, calling it "un-Islamic".

    burs-phz/mfp

    © 1994-2015 Agence France-Presse


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    Source: International Committee of the Red Cross
    Country: Mali

    Geneva / Bamako (ICRC) – The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) is profoundly dismayed by the death of one of its staff in Mali. An ICRC aid truck was attacked this morning near Gao, leaving one ICRC staff member dead and a member of the Mali Red Cross injured.

    The ICRC strongly condemns the attack and calls on all parties to the conflict to respect and protect humanitarian workers.

    "It is with great shock that we learnt of the death of our colleague and friend Hamadoun," said Yasmine Praz Dessimoz, head of operations for North and West Africa. "He was driving a truck from Gao to Niamey, in neighbouring Niger, to collect much-needed medical equipment for Gao hospital. His death is not only a tragedy for his family and for the ICRC, it will affect the life and well-being of tens of thousands of people."

    Hamadoun was accompanied by a member of the Mali Red Cross at the time of the attack. The latter was injured but is in a stable condition. The exact circumstances of the incident remain unclear at this stage, but the ICRC truck was clearly marked with the red cross emblem.

    "The humanitarian situation in northern Mali is worrying and our teams are working hard to support the local communities affected," said Yasmine Praz Dessimoz. "But the ICRC is concerned about the rise in violence against humanitarian workers, which is preventing them from coming to the aid of individuals and communities in dire need."

    The ICRC calls on all those involved in the conflict to protect the civilian population and ensure that humanitarian workers can perform their duties. The red cross emblem must be respected.

    The ICRC extends its deepest condolences to Hamadoun's wife and four children, and to all his relatives and friends.

    For further information, please contact: Valery Mbaoh Nana, ICRC Bamako, tel: +223 20 29 72 14 / 15 or +223 76 99 63 75 Claire Kaplun, ICRC Geneva, tel: +41 22 730 3149 or +41 79 244 64 05


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    Source: Qatar Red Crescent Society
    Country: Mali, Niger

    ​Under a memorandum of understanding (MoU) signed recently with the World Food Programme (WFP), Qatar Red Crescent (QRC) has received an in-kind grant including 2.17 ton medical and food items used to control malnutrition, as well as the costs of moving the assistance to the target region, as part of the relief efforts for the Malian refugees who fled to Niger due to political and military events in northern Mali.

    The grant consists of 1,27 ton nutritional items and 0.13 ton natural oils for pregnant and breastfeeding women, 0.77 ton dietary supplements for malnourished children, and 1000 euros to cover the moving and storage costs.

    One Hundred and sixty-six children, mothers, and pregnant women in Tibareybarey Refugee Camp, Tillabéri Region, are expected to receive daily rations of these items for six months.

    QRC is assigned to store and manage the received items, examine the mothers and children for malnutrition cases, follow up with these cases through its camp medical center, and report on the food conditions at the camp.

    This grant was given to QRC upon the recommendation of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), which has several common relief projects with QRC for the Malian refugees in Niger. This reflects the trust of UN agencies in the professionalism of QRC staff working there.

    QRC and UNHCR have already four agreements in effect, under which QRC operates three health centers that provide primary health care inside refugee camps, as well as ambulance services to move serious cases to national hospitals or medical facilities. There are more than 100 well-trained QRC medical and administrative staff. Thanks to the effective relief intervention by these teams, UNHCR chose QRC to be the organization responsible for its health projects.

    QRC's West/Central Africa Office coordinates closely with the Nigerien authorities to provide administrative facilities and secure the camps.

    Every day, QRC's health care workers cover diseased and particularly critical cases, notably pediatric surgeries such as bladder stone removal, Caesarean sections that saved the lives of hundreds of women with the available ambulance vehicles and medical workers, discovery and treatment of several tuberculosis cases, and distribution of medicines to chronic patients.

    These medical teams serve more than 30,000 Malians at refugee camps, as well as over 74,000 people of adjacent local communities.


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria

    Mr. President,
    Distinguished Members of the Security Council,

    Thank you for this opportunity to brief the Council on the humanitarian impact of Boko Haram atrocities in northern Nigeria and the neighbouring countries. On behalf of the Under-Secretary-General and Emergency Relief Coordinator Valerie Amos, I would like to deliver the following statement.

    Mr President Despite several reports of suspected Boko Haram attacks in Yobe, Gombe and Borno States, I can report that no additional humanitarian needs have so far emerged as a result of the election. We will continue to closely monitor the situation on the ground as the likelihood of electoral violence will remain high around the announcement of the results.

    Mr. President,

    Since the State of Emergency was declared in May 2013, the ongoing violent conflict in north-eastern Nigeria and the Lake Chad Basin has forcibly displaced at least 1.5 million people in Nigeria and neighboring countries.

    Throughout 2014, Boko Haram escalated its campaign, and communities in northern Nigeria have increasingly been caught in the crossfire between the insurgents and the National Army. The conflict has caused death and injury on a large scale, destroyed homes and infrastructure.

    More than 7,300 civilians have been killed by Boko Haram since the beginning of 2014 in the three State of Emergency States. This year alone 1,000 people have lost their lives. More than 300 schools have been severely damaged or destroyed. Less than 40 per cent of health facilities in affected areas remain operational. Gross human rights violations, including sexual and gender-based violence and child trafficking, are frequently reported.

    The escalation of Boko Haram related violence in the region continues to hinder access to people in desperate need of humanitarian assistance and is limiting the scope of our response.

    An overwhelming majority of the internally displaced people (IDP) reside within host communities and in ‘camp-like’ conditions clustered around schools, churches and mosques.
    Due to the lack of capacity, according to the International Organization for Migration (IOM), only 10 per cent of the over one million IDPs are staying in identified and accessible Government-run IDP camps in urban areas. The minimum humanitarian standards for shelter, food, water, sanitation, health or education are not being met in these camps due to lack of capacities in camp management and protection. The plight of civilians stranded or hiding in areas which humanitarian organisations are currently unable to reach is deeply concerning, especially those in areas still under the control of Boko Haram.

    Mr. President,

    As many as three million people in northern Nigeria will not be able to meet their basic food needs after July 2015 unless they receive well-targeted humanitarian assistance.
    While the Federal and State authorities have worked hard to provide assistance to many of those fleeing the violence, the humanitarian response in the north-eastern Nigeria remains overall poor and fragmented. Only nine operational partners, mostly international NGOs, are currently active in the three most affected states. In support of the National and State level Emergency Management Agencies’ efforts, these humanitarian partners undertake emergency programmes in Protection, which include the provision of psychological first aid and psychosocial support or the registration and support to unaccompanied children, as well as other lifesaving activities in the sectors of water, sanitation, health or food distribution. These programmes, however, are limited in scope as they mainly target IDPs registered in the Government-run camps.

    In addition to insecurity, lack of donor support is constraining the expansion of the humanitarian footprint. Humanitarian partners are ready to do more and scale up their efforts.
    To do so, donor engagement and continued financial support are critical. In addition, accurate and reliable humanitarian data and effective monitoring systems are needed for informed humanitarian planning, effective advocacy and sustained donor support.

    From 9 to 12 March 2015, twelve Emergency Directors of the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) visited Nigeria to assess the humanitarian situation and identify potential solutions to address the current challenges in north-east Nigeria. As a result of their visit, a three-month inter-agency action plan is being developed to support scale-up of critical protection and lifesaving response efforts and humanitarian presence in conflict-affected areas in the north east.

    Mr. President,

    The expansion of Boko Haram's activities is having a significant regional impact. In Cameroon, according to UNHCR, some 74,000 refugees had sought refuge in the Far North as of 25 March. Boko Haram cross-border attacks from Nigeria into Cameroon have also triggered the internal displacement of between 100,000 to 150,000 Cameroonians. In Niger, 50,000 people have been internally displaced, adding to the 100,000 Nigerian refugees and Nigerien returnees who have sought refuge in the Diffa region of Niger, since May 2014. In Chad the Boko Haram incursion has caused some 33,000 refugees and returnees as well as 14,500 IDPs seeking refuge around Lake Chad.

    In the three affected countries, insecurity and logistical challenges have impeded access, which in addition to significant funding shortfalls, are preventing the scale-up of humanitarian response. The three Governments have requested international assistance to respond to the most pressing needs, which include protection, food assistance, water, non-food items, health and shelters.

    Mr. President,

    The massive displacement caused by Boko Haram cross-border incursions is placing immense strain on the already depleted resources of host communities who, in some areas, are as vulnerable as the displaced themselves. Food is more difficult to find in the market and prices have, in some instances, doubled or tripled. In Diffa, almost a quarter of children aged 6 to 23 months were suffering global acute malnutrition at the end of 2014. In Chad, over 30 per cent of those in host communities were food insecure in 2014. In north-east Nigeria, an estimated 4.6 million people are currently suffering food insecurity and 100,000 children are at risk of severe malnutrition.

    The Boko Haram crisis is likely to have a broader impact on the Sahel region as Nigeria traditionally produces almost half of the region’s cereals. On 15 March, the Emergency Relief Coordinator approved US$28 million from the UN Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) to address the regional humanitarian impact of Boko Haram. We hope that more support from the international community will follow to enable humanitarian actors to continue to reach those in need with lifesaving assistance.

    Mr. President,

    The humanitarian community welcomes the regional political commitment to tackle the ongoing violence in the northeast. In light of the current discussion in this Council, it is critical that the Multi-National Joint Task Force (MNJTF), as a counter-terrorism force, limits its focus to creating conducive security conditions and an enabling environment for nonmilitary related interventions, while adhering to International Humanitarian Law and taking all precautions to avoid civilian casualties. As the MNJTF is a de facto party to conflict, I ask Council Members to ensure that MNJTF operations remain distinct from civilian-led humanitarian operations. Maintaining distinction between the two is crucial in order to safeguard the actual and perceived neutrality and independence of humanitarian organisations. In addition the MNJTF should not be involved in facilitating the returns of refugees and IDPs.
    This must be carried out on a voluntary basis in line with International Humanitarian Law and the Kampala Convention, to which Nigeria is a party.

    Mr. President,

    The humanitarian situation in north-east Nigeria and in the conflict-affected areas in neigbouring countries remains dire. The conflict continues to have a devastating impact on women, children and young people, as well as on many others who have been traumatized by violence. Additional funding to address the acute humanitarian needs of those affected by the conflict is urgently needed. So far, local organisations and communities have carried the weight of this response. The Government of Nigeria has stated its willingness and ability to shoulder a significant portion of the operational and financing needs to respond to the crisis. However support from the international community is also needed to help to respond to the urgent humanitarian situation in north-east Nigeria. An international humanitarian presence is needed to advise and help coordinate a complex and fast-moving operation and to support the provision of the necessary protection measures for the civilians caught up in the conflict.

    Thank you.


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    Source: Deutsche Welle
    Country: Nigeria

    Election observers from the European Union have given Nigeria’s general elections a clean bill of health despite delays caused by the malfunctioning of the biometric card readers.

    According to the head of the EU observer mission, Santiago Fisas, Nigeria's electoral commission (INEC) performed incredibly well in the wake of difficulties.

    "The EU observation mission strongly encourages INEC efforts in difficult circumstances, and in spite of strong tension and criticism to maintain the highest level of impartiality, Fisas told reporters at a press briefing in Lagos.

    The vote of confidence by the EU could undoubtedly serve as a morale booster to the commission which received a back lash from a cross-section of Nigerians for having introduced the biometric voting system without having tested it on a smaller electoral process.

    The winner of the vote in Africa's most populous and biggest nation could be announced late Monday (30.03.2015) or on Tuesday, electoral officials said. The race between President Goodluck Jonathan and former military dictator Muhammadu Buhari was too close to call, according to analysts.

    However the EU observer mission was also quick to add that several lapses were however observed by the mission which Hannah Roberts the deputy head of the observation mission, said there was an overall improvement of the electoral process.

    "Generally the voting process may be characterized as disordered and prolonged. Although polling procedures were insufficiently followed, the EU observation mission saw no evidence of systematic manipulations," she said.

    "The use of the biometric card readers was problematic resulting in manual voter identification being undertaken. We saw some procedural irregularities during voting and counting with procedures not always followed. For example results at polling units were not always publically displayed," Roberts said. Other observers have also described the elections as the best ever held in the past 16 years after the return of democracy.

    Fears of manipulation

    Despite these positive signs by the EU, the United States and Britain have expressed concerns about vote rigging. US Secretary of State John Kerry and his British counterpart Philip Hammond Monday warned over possible political interference in Nigeria's vote count.

    In a joint statement the two said: "We have seen no evidence of systemic manipulation of the process. But there are disturbing indications that the collation process -- where the votes are finally counted -- may be subject to deliberate political interference."

    INEC rejected the claims by the two diplomats saying there was no evidence of party meddling in the count.

    Nigerians are eagerly waiting for the final results from what is described as the most hotlycontest in its political history. They hope that whoever wins the election will give the country a new political direction. And deal with the issue of insecurity caused by the Boko Haram in the north east of the country.


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    Source: International Committee of the Red Cross
    Country: Mali

    Genève / Bamako (CICR) – Le Comité international de la Croix-Rouge (CICR) est consterné par la mort d'un de ses collaborateurs au Mali. L'attaque du camion d'aide du CICR qu'il conduisait a eu lieu ce matin près de Gao, tuant ce collaborateur et blessant un membre de la Croix-Rouge malienne.

    Le CICR condamne avec la plus grande fermeté cette attaque et en appelle à toutes les parties au conflit pour qu'elles respectent et protègent les travailleurs humanitaires.

    « Nous avons été très choqués d'apprendre la mort de notre collègue et ami Hamadoun, a déclaré Yasmine Praz Dessimoz, chef des opérations du CICR en Afrique du Nord et de l'Ouest. Il était parti de Gao au volant du camion qu'il conduisait jusqu'à Niamey, au Niger voisin, d'où il devait rapporter du matériel médical pour l'hôpital de Gao, qui en manque cruellement. Sa mort n'est pas seulement une tragédie pour sa famille et pour le CICR. Elle va avoir un impact sur la vie et la santé de dizaines de milliers de personnes. »

    Au moment de l'attaque, Hamadoun était accompagné d'un membre de la Croix-Rouge malienne. Ce dernier a été blessé mais ses jours ne sont pas en danger. Les circonstances exactes de l'attaque ne sont pas clairement connues au stade actuel, mais le camion était clairement marqué de l'emblème du CICR.

    « La situation humanitaire dans le nord du Mali est préoccupante, affirme Yasmine Praz Dessimoz. Nos équipes mettent tout en œuvre pour soutenir les communautés locales touchées mais le CICR est préoccupé par la violence croissante qui est exercée contre les travailleurs humanitaires et les empêche de venir en aide à des personnes et des communautés complètement démunies. »

    Le CICR demande à tous ceux qui participent au conflit de protéger la population civile et de laisser les humanitaires faire leur travail. Il rappelle que l'emblème de la croix rouge doit être respecté.

    Le CICR adresse ses condoléances les plus sincères à l'épouse d'Hamadoun et à ses quatre enfants, ainsi qu'à toute sa famille et ses amis.

    Informations complémentaires :
    Valery Mbaoh Nana, CICR Bamako, tél. : +223 20 29 72 14 / 15 ou +223 76 99 63 75
    Claire Kaplun, CICR Genève, tél.: +41 22 730 3149 ou +41 79 244 64 05


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    Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
    Country: Senegal

    FOOD SECURITY SNAPSHOT

    • Cereal production estimated to have dropped 38 percent in 2014 due to insufficient rains

    • About 927 000 people estimated to be in need of assistance


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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Chad, Nigeria

    Les récoltes de cultures de contre saison améliorent le niveau des stocks des ménages

    MESSAGES CLÉS

    • Les récoltes de contre-saison (berbéré, maïs et maraichage) en cours améliorent le niveau des stocks des ménages pauvres et très pauvres dans les zones de production (Salamat, Guera, Batha, Sila, Mayo kebbi, Moyen Chari et une partie du Chari Baguirmi). Dans le Kanem, le BEG,
      Hadjer Lamis et Guera les stocks des ménages s’épuisent précocement un à deux mois avant la période normale.

    • L’approvisionnement des marchés céréaliers est normal et les disponibilités en céréales sont globalement suffisantes. Le niveau actuel des prix est inférieur à celui de l’année dernière à la même période. Le prix du berbéré à Amtiman enregistre compte-tenu des nouvelles récoltes, une baisse de 21 pourcent comparé au mois de Février 2015 et 11 pourcent comparé à la moyenne quinquennale.

    • Dans la zone soudanienne, les stocks des ménages sont moyens comparés à 2014 à la même période. Toutes les zones de moyen d’existence sont actuellement en phase Minimale (Phase 1 de l’IPC) et y demeureront jusqu’à juin. Dans la zone sahélienne, les ménages pauvres et très pauvres du Kanem, BEG et Guéra ont une consommation alimentaire réduite et sont en Stress (Phase 2 de l’IPC).

    • Entre avril et juin, la soudure pastorale sera précoce dans le BEG, Kanem, et le Lac. Avec les prix des animaux en dessous du normal, les termes de l’échange vont se détériorer à un moment où la disponibilité laitière va baisser. La situation alimentaire qui est actuellement en phase 2 se détériorait en Crise (Phase 3 de l’IPC) sans l’assistance planifiée pour cette période.


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria

    Early March, the National Emergency Agency (NEMA) accounted for more than 1.2 million internally displaced people in North-East States. In addition, 194,000 Nigerians and stranded migrants have fled to neighbouring countries to seek safety. While the Nigerians armed forces are making progress against the insurgents, living conditions remain difficult for those affected by the current conflict. There is still an urgent needs of humanitarian assistance to sustain voluntary return of IDPs and refugees.

    DISPLACEMENT 1.2 million Estimated internally displaced people by conflict and inter-communal violence as of 10 March 2015

    194,000 People fled to neighbouring countries including refugees, returnees and stranded migrants as 10 March 2015

    ACTORS RESPONDING 21 humanitarian actors, including the United Nations, the Red Cross/Red Crescent Movement and International NGOs and the National Emergency Management Agency are responding to the humanitarian needs in the three states under recurrent Boko Haram attacks and the surrounding states in the North-east.

    CRITICAL NEEDS The most urgent needs of people affected by the conflict include protection, shelter, food and access to education and health services for both displaced persons and host communities remains.


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    Source: Assessment Capacities Project
    Country: Afghanistan, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, Vanuatu, World, Yemen

    Snapshot 25–31 March 2015

    Ukraine: Fears are growing of a new offensive in Mariupol, as non-government troops appear to be gathering nearby. A recent assessment has found that more than 1.6 million people need humanitarian assistance, nearly 1.1 million of whom are in non-government-controlled areas. 20–30% of IDPs are at risk of losing their status and benefits, due to a new mechanism to verify the addresses of IDPs.

    Nigeria: Opposition candidate Buharu has been declared winner of the presidential election, but irregularities have been alleged, and there have already been protests in Rivers state. Boko Haram is suspected of attacks in Gombe state, including on polling stations, which killed seven, and there have been attacks on polling stations in Bauchi.

    Yemen: Saudi-led aerial bombing has reportedly disabled the Houthis’ air force. It has also displaced some 4,500 people to refugee camps in Hajjah. Airstrikes killed 45 people in Mazraq refugee camp, and 25 in Sanaa. The Houthis advance south continued; they and their allies have taken Lahj governorate and Aden airport

    Updated: 31/03/2015. Next update: 08/04/2015

    Global Emergency Overview Web Interface


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    Source: Permanent Interstate Committee for Drought Control in the Sahel, Government of Chad
    Country: Chad

    • Formation sur le Cadre Harmonisé du 23 et 24 octobre 2014

    • Collecte de données Octobre /Novembre 2014 (SMART ENSA, HEA, Evaluation de la campagne agropastorale, SPI, SISAAP, FAO, PAM, UNICEF, ONGs, OCHA, AVIS d’EXPERTS…

    • Disponibilité des données (CA, EME, NUTRITION) corroborés aux facteurs contributifs (dangers/vulnérabilité, disponibilité, accessibilité et utilisation)

    • Expertises mixtes, groupe d’environ 40 participants dont 60% ayant pris connaissance avec CH

    • Grand engouement et expression libre des points de vues souvent contradictoires mais à la fin le consensus a prévalu.

    • Analyse consensuelle, objective et participative malgré les difficultés constatées (capacités d’analyse, déficit en données,)


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    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Chad, Niger, Nigeria

    Niamey, Niger | | mardi 31/03/2015 - 13:49 GMT

    Des combattants de Boko Haram ont mené une incursion lundi dans le sud-est du Niger mais ont été repoussés au Nigeria voisin par les armées tchadienne et nigérienne, qui leur ont infligé de lourdes pertes, a annoncé mardi l'armée tchadienne.

    Les combats ont fait 47 morts "côté ennemi" et zéro "côté ami", a indiqué l'état-major tchadien dans un communiqué.

    Les bilans communiqués par les pays combattant Boko Haram (Nigeria, Tchad, Cameroun et Niger) sont souvent très défavorables aux islamistes, sans qu'il soit généralement possible d'obtenir un état des pertes humaines venant d'autres sources, aucun acteur tiers (ONG, ONU) n'étant présent dans les zones de combat.

    Une source humanitaire a toutefois fait état mardi d'un bilan "de 40 à 47 morts côté Boko Haram" à Bosso - une bourgade nigérienne située à proximité de la frontière entre le Niger et le Nigeria - et dans ses environs.

    "Les terroristes de Boko Haram ont tenté une incursion à Bosso. (...) Ils ont été stoppés par les forces armées tchado-nigériennes qui les ont poursuivis jusqu'à leur poste de commandement", a annoncé l'état-major tchadien.

    Les rebelles, dont plusieurs véhicules et notamment un blindé ont été détruits, ont été "repoussés jusqu'au Nigeria", avait précisé mardi matin une source militaire tchadienne.

    Les islamistes ont "fui", selon un élu du sud-est du Niger, "jusqu'à Malam Fatori", une ville nigériane proche de Bosso que les armées nigérienne et tchadienne disent vouloir reprendre à Boko Haram.

    L'armée nigériane affirme à l'inverse que Malam Fatori est sous son contrôle.

    Des milliers de soldats nigériens et tchadiens, massés depuis près de deux mois dans le sud-est du Niger, mènent depuis le 8 mars une offensive dans le nord-est du Nigeria, frontalier, considéré comme le fief des insurgés.

    L'état-major tchadien a également fait état d'une "opération de ratissage" menée dimanche par les armées tchadienne et nigérienne à Talagam, une commune située entre Damasak, la première ville reprise à Boko Haram, et Malam Fatori.

    Cette opération a fait, selon l'armée tchadienne, 54 morts parmi les islamistes, et 2 morts et 15 blessés dans les rangs de la coalition.

    Une autre source humanitaire avait mentionné lundi à l'AFP le décès de 3 soldats tchadiens dans des combats dimanche.

    La radio privée Anfani, basée à Diffa, la grande ville du sud-est du Niger, a fait état lundi "d'intenses bombardements aériens" dans le lit du lac Tchad, où se trouvent notamment Bosso et Malam Fatori.

    Si elle a également rapporté la destruction par des éléments de Boko Haram d'une antenne-relais pour téléphones cellulaires samedi à Bosso, ces incursions sont désormais plutôt rares en territoire nigérien.

    "La situation est totalement sous contrôle" au Niger, déclarait mi-mars Mohamed Bazoum, un proche du président nigérien Mahamadou Issoufou.

    "Il n'y a plus de chance que Boko Haram prenne une ville, même sur le lit du lac Tchad" où les insurgés avaient commis plusieurs attaques courant février, avait poursuivi cet ancien ministre des Affaires étrangères.

    "Les risques de survenance d'attentats sont même très réduits du fait de l'élimination de tous les acteurs potentiels", avait-il estimé.

    yas-bh-cl/jf-ndy/sba

    © 1994-2015 Agence France-Presse


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