Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

ReliefWeb - Updates

older | 1 | .... | 152 | 153 | (Page 154) | 155 | 156 | .... | 728 | newer

    0 0

    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan (Republic of)
    preview


    SUMMARY

    Kenya held its first general elections under the new Constitution in March 2013. The elections were generally peaceful with only isolated incidences of election-related violence. The Government and humanitarian partners had adequately prepared for potential post-election violence through contingency planning and pre-positioning of essential supplies in strategic locations.

    However, there have been periodic incidences of inter-communal violence as the result of competition for resources and political differences. In the latter part of 2012 and early 2013, the inter-ethnic conflict in Tana River County between the Orma and Pokomo communities affected over 2,000 households and led to the disruption of essential services, including health care and education. Mandera County also witnessed clashes between the Garre and Degodia clans which have led to ongoing displacements of more than 2,880 households between late February and end of May and significant loss of livelihood.

    In relation to food and livelihood insecurity in Kenya‘s arid and semi-arid areas (ASAL), the favorable 2012 long rains and short rains led to improvements in most parts of the country.

    Thanks to water and pasture availability in pastoral areas, crop production has increased and livestock body conditions improved. This has reduced the number of Kenyans who are food insecure from 2.1 million to 1.1 million. Nutrition indicators also show an overall improvement in the nutrition status at household level with the reduction of the caseload of children with acute malnutrition.

    The 2013 March-to-May long rains saw enhanced rainfall that led to flooding in western, coast and central regions of Kenya. According to the Kenya Red Cross Society (KRCS), over 140,000 people were displaced as a result. The stocks pre-positioned in preparation for elections were used to support the first-line response—led by the Government of Kenya, the KRCS and other humanitarian partners—to address the immediate needs of the displaced populations through shelter/non-food items (NFIs), water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), health and food.

    The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) reports that the number of refugees in the Dadaab refugee camps has reduced to about 425,000 people. At the same time, the number of refugees from Sudan and South Sudan in Kakuma refugee camp increased by 18,000 since the beginning of the year bringing the total population to more than 119,000. This number is expected to further increase to 130,000 by the end of the year.

    Despite these challenges, Kenya has continued to progress towards its goal of Vision 2030, the country‘s economic and social blueprint. Future coordination between UN agencies and other development and humanitarian partners will centre on institutions at national and county level.

    Partners will continue to support the country‘s transition and resilience agenda through the Government‘s five-year Medium-Term Plan (MTP II).

    As a result of the generous support of donors, the 2013 Emergency Humanitarian Response Plan (EHRP) has received 41% of the US $663 million requested to date which has allowed the continued provision of humanitarian programmes and services in response to drought, floods, displacement and the on-going refugee situation.Improvements in the situation and a reevaluation of projects for the next six months of the year have led to a reduction in the requirements from $744 million to $663 million.

    Despite the continued need for humanitarian assistance in some parts of the country—including the counties of the north-east and the large refugee population—the overall improvement in the situation in the ASALs and the successful completion of elections and the continued strengthening of national disaster response capacities have led the members of the Kenya Humanitarian Partnership Team to expect that there will be no need for an EHRP in 2014.


    0 0

    Source: UN Security Council
    Country: Côte d'Ivoire, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone

    SC/11057

    Security Council
    6995th Meeting (AM)

    West Africa had continued to face multiple political and security challenges, including elections-related tensions, transnational organized crime, piracy and terrorism, the United Nations envoy for the region told the Security Council today.

    Said Djinnit, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for West Africa and Head of the United Nations Office for the region (UNOWA), also noted that the humanitarian situation there continued to be characterized by food insecurity and malnutrition as funding dwindled.

    His 20-minute briefing, following up the Secretary-General’s 28 June report on activities in the areas of preventive diplomacy, early warning and capacity building to address the emerging challenges to regional peace and stability (document S/2013/384), covered a wide range of issues, whereas his last presentation, on 25 January, had highlighted the situation in Mali.

    First, offering an update on Mali, Mr. Djinnit recalled that the 18 June agreement obliged the signatories to dialogue and negotiation as a means of resolving the conflict there. It also provided for the presidential election to take place this month, followed by an inclusive political process for a comprehensive and durable settlement. His office would continue to assist the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) and other stakeholders to mobilize regional support for Mali’s stabilization.

    UNOWA would also extend similar support to the United Nations Integrated Peacebuilding Office in Guinea-Bissau (UNIOGBIS), he said, acknowledging recent encouraging efforts towards inclusive governance and the holding of a presidential election.

    Turning to Guinea, he noted that the 3 July agreement ended months of differences between the presidential coalition and the opposition on electoral issues. The accord provided a timetable for the holding of the legislative election in September 2013, which would allow the Government and its people to, at last, focus their energies on socioeconomic transformation and development. To ensure the rule of law and the fight against impunity, he looked forward to the outcome of the investigations into the violent demonstrations by the opposition, which had resulted in casualties, property damage and loss of livelihood.

    Persistent tensions along the borders between Liberia and Côte d’Ivoire, as well as other trans-border threats continued to undermine stability and long-term development efforts in the Mano River nations, despite their great potential for economic development. On 29 June, his office, along with the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and the Mano River Union, had convened a high-level meeting to launch the process of developing a security strategy for that region. Through existing regional initiatives, the blueprint should address cross-border threats based on a comprehensive approach, taking into account the nexus between security and development, he added.

    Piracy and armed robbery in the Gulf of Guinea was another regional security threat, which negatively affected international maritime trade routes transiting through the area and had a significant potential to undermine economic progress in both coastal and landlocked countries, he noted. At a regional summit in June, the resolve of leaders to establish an effective framework to combat those maritime incidents had crystallized with the adoption of key strategic documents — a code of conduct, a memorandum of understanding and a political declaration.

    Mr. Djinnit described the Sahel as the third area of West Africa’s fragility presenting a high number of indicators of vulnerability, ranging from environmental degradation, desertification and food insecurity to terrorism and illicit trafficking of arms and drugs. Those underscored the need for a United Nations integrated strategy for the Sahel, which complemented efforts by the countries and organizations of the region to address the root causes and consequences of instability in the Sahel-Sahara belt.

    On terrorism and other transnational threats, he welcomed the recent adoption by the ECOWAS Summit of their counter-terrorism strategy and the extension of their Regional Plan of Action against drug trafficking and organized crime, but added that those needed to be effectively implemented. Citing recent terrorist attacks in Niger and Nigeria, he warned that extremists groups were taking advantage of the porous borders and the limited State capacities.

    Generally, West Africa was preoccupied with the challenge of election-related tensions and the negative impact of unregulated security sectors, he said. His office, in liaison with the relevant United Nations country teams, remained committed to assist in election processes. Security sector reform was making progress in Guinea and under way in Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali and Sierra Leone.

    Significant progress had been made in the boundary demarcation between Cameroon and Nigeria, he said. A follow-up process launched in 2006 regarding the Green Tree Agreement would finally come to an end with the holding of its last meeting on the margins of the General Assembly session in September.

    The meeting began at 10:15 a.m. and ended at 10:35 a.m.

    For information media • not an official record


    0 0

    Source: UN Security Council
    Country: Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Niger, Nigeria

    Conseil de sécurité CS/11057

    Le Représentant spécial du Secrétaire général pour l’Afrique de l’Ouest, M. Said Djinnit, a affirmé, ce matin devant le Conseil de sécurité, que la sous-région continuait de faire face à de multiples défis politiques et sécuritaires liés principalement à la criminalité transnationale organisée, aux actes de piraterie et de terrorisme ainsi qu’aux tensions résultant d’élections dans certains pays.

    « L’Afrique de l’Ouest qui est, plus que jamais, à la croisée des chemins dans sa quête de paix et de sécurité, mérite une attention accrue des Nations Unies », a déclaré M. Djinnit, qui présentait le rapport du Secrétaire général, M. Ban Ki-moon, sur les activités du Bureau des Nations Unies pour l’Afrique de l’Ouest (UNOWA) au cours des six derniers mois.

    Le Chef du Bureau s’est dit encouragé par l’engagement manifesté par la Communauté économique des États de l’Afrique de l’Ouest (CEDEAO) en vue de renforcer l’architecture collective de paix et de sécurité, tirant ainsi les leçons des défis rencontrés dans la réponse régionale à la crise au Mali.

    Pour M. Djinnit, les dirigeants des pays de l’Afrique de l’Ouest et de leurs institutions régionales, telle la CEDEAO, comptent sur « l’attention et le soutien continus » de l’ONU et de son Conseil de sécurité aux efforts qu’ils déploient en vue de promouvoir la paix, la stabilité et le développement à long terme dans la sous-région.

    Le Bureau des Nations Unies pour l’Afrique de l’Ouest, dont le mandat expire le 31 décembre 2013, est engagé à « consolider le précieux partenariat » forgé avec les autres entités de l’ONU présentes dans la sous-région, la CEDEAO et d’autres organisations continentales et régionales, notamment l’Union africaine et l’Union du fleuve Mano, « afin de promouvoir et consolider la paix et la stabilité en Afrique de l’Ouest », a-t-il ajouté.

    « Dans ce contexte, nous continuerons à encourager les processus de dialogue comme la voie la mieux indiquée pour résoudre les conflits et les différends. »

    Dans son exposé, le Représentant spécial a souligné que depuis sa dernière intervention devant le Conseil de sécurité, le 25 janvier 2013, la situation humanitaire dans la sous-région continuait d’être caractérisée par l’insécurité alimentaire et la malnutrition, face à une diminution des ressources financières.

    Le Chef du Bureau a également fait part de ses graves préoccupations concernant le caractère complexe et transfrontalier des défis posés par les groupes extrémistes et des organisations terroristes.

    Pour relever ces défis, a poursuivi M. Djinnit, les dirigeants de la sous-région ont fait preuve d’un grand engagement collectif en vue d’améliorer la sécurité et promouvoir la paix et la stabilité dans le cadre de la CEDEAO et d’autres organisations régionales telles que l’Union du fleuve Mano.

    Outre les efforts louables déployés par la CEDEAO et ses dirigeants pour répondre aux crises au Mali et en Guinée-Bissau, l’organisation régionale a poursuivi ses efforts visant à promouvoir des solutions pacifiques aux différends entre ses États membres, a-t-il dit, en précisant qu’un certain nombre de différends frontaliers avaient ainsi pu être résolus ou sont soumis à des procédures de règlement pacifique.

    En ce qui concerne la Guinée, M. Djinnit a souligné qu’un accord avait été conclu le 3 juillet, prévoyant un calendrier consensuel pour la tenue de l’élection législative en septembre 2013. Cet accord, a-t-il dit, a « ouvert la voie à la tenue d’élections législatives libres, transparentes et inclusives susceptibles, enfin, d’orienter toute l’énergie du Gouvernement et du peuple guinéen vers la transformation socioéconomique et le développement du pays ».

    Il a remercié le Conseil de sécurité, la formation Guinée de la Commission de consolidation de la paix (CCP) et d’autres partenaires internationaux, régionaux et bilatéraux pour leur soutien aux efforts qu’il a déployés, avec les facilitateurs nationaux, afin de rétablir le dialogue et de promouvoir un accord entre les parties.

    La piraterie et les vols à main armée en mer dans le golfe de Guinée constituent une autre menace régionale à la sécurité des pays d’Afrique de l’Ouest, a d’autre part expliqué M. Djinnit. C’est un phénomène qui, a-t-il dit, « affecte négativement le transport et le commerce international par voies maritimes dans cette région, et risque de compromettre durablement le développement économique des pays du littoral et des pays enclavés ».

    Il a souligné que la détermination des dirigeants de la sous-région à mettre en place un cadre de lutte contre la piraterie et le vol à main armée en mer s’était concrétisée lors du Sommet des chefs d’État et de gouvernement de la Communauté économique des États de l’Afrique centrale (CEEAC), de la CEDEAO et de la Commission du golfe de Guinée (CGG) qui s’est tenu à Yaoundé, au Cameroun, les 24 et 25 juin derniers.

    Le Sommet a adopté trois documents stratégiques clefs, à savoir le Code de conduite relatif à la prévention et à la répression des actes de piraterie, des vols à main armée à l’encontre des navires, et des activités maritimes illicites en Afrique de l’Ouest et centrale; le Mémorandum d’entente entre la CEEAC, la CEDEAO et la CGG sur la sûreté et la sécurité dans l’espace maritime de l’Afrique de l’Ouest et du Centre; et une déclaration politique.

    Il a par ailleurs été décidé que la CEEAC, la CEDEAO, la CGG, le Bureau régional des Nations Unies pour l’Afrique centrale (BRENUAC) et le Gouvernement du Cameroun œuvreraient conjointement au développement d’un programme d’action sur la sécurité maritime.

    La région du Sahel représente la troisième zone de vulnérabilité en Afrique de l’Ouest, comme cela s’est manifesté à travers la crise du Mali, a poursuivi le Chef du Bureau. Cette région, a-t-il fait observer, « enregistre une concentration importante d’indicateurs de vulnérabilité qui se traduisent, notamment, par la dégradation de l’environnement, la désertification, l’insécurité alimentaire, les trafics d’armes et de drogues et le terrorisme ».

    Cette fragilité de la région du Sahel souligne, a-t-il estimé, « toute la pertinence de la stratégie intégrée des Nations Unies pour le Sahel qui vise à compléter les efforts des pays de la région et des organisations régionales afin de remédier aux causes profondes de l’instabilité le long de la bande sahélo-saharienne et ses conséquences ».

    De même, le Représentant spécial a rappelé que la récente adoption par le Sommet de la CEDEAO de la stratégie sur la lutte contre le terrorisme et le renouvellement du Plan d’action régional contre le trafic de drogues, la criminalité transnationale organisée et l’abus de drogues représentaient des « développements encourageants qui doivent désormais être traduits en actions concrètes, avec le soutien de la communauté internationale ».

    Évoquant notamment l’attaque terroriste du 6 juillet dernier perpétrée contre une école dans l’État de Yobe, qui a causé la mort de 42 personnes innocentes, dont des étudiants, alors que l’état d’urgence était encore en vigueur dans cette région, M. Djinnit a souligné « la détermination des groupes terroristes à semer la terreur et la désolation », tout en relevant la « complexité du problème ».

    « Les relations avérées entre les groupes terroristes opérant dans la sous-région exigent une action concertée et d’ampleur régionale face à cette menace », a-t-il déclaré, en précisant qu’une telle action « doit également se pencher sur les causes profondes de l’instabilité et inclure naturellement la dimension des droits de l’homme ».

    Pour le Représentant spécial, « le défi que posent les tensions liées aux élections et l’impact négatif du manque de gouvernance et de régulation des forces de défense et de sécurité dans certains pays demeurent également une source de préoccupation en Afrique de l’Ouest ».

    Il a indiqué que, dans le cadre de la prévention des tensions électorales, l’UNOWA, en relation avec les équipes de pays des Nations Unies dans les pays concernés, continuait d’intervenir « par le biais de missions de bons offices, en vue de créer des conditions propices à la tenue d’élections apaisées, comme c’est le cas en Guinée ».

    Par ailleurs, en sa qualité de Président de la Commission mixte Cameroun-Nigéria (CMCN), M. Djinnit a mis l’accent sur les progrès significatifs enregistrés dans l’abornement de la frontière entre les deux paysà la suite des bons offices et du processus de renforcement de la confiance dirigé par les Nations Unies.

    Le Représentant spécial a annoncé que la dernière réunion du Comité de suivi, qui marque la fin de la période de transition avant le transfert de souveraineté sur la péninsule de Bakassi au Cameroun, sera convoquée en septembre prochain à New York, en marge de la soixante-huitième session de l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies.

    CONSOLIDATION DE LA PAIX EN AFRIQUE DE L’OUEST

    Rapport du Secrétaire général sur les activités du Bureau des Nations Unies pour l’Afrique de l’Ouest ( S/2013/384)

    Le Secrétaire général de l’ONU, M. Ban Ki-moon, dans ce rapport, qui couvre la période du 1er janvier au 30 juin 2013, donne un aperçu d’ensemble de l’évolution des faits dans chaque pays, dans l’ensemble de la région et à travers les frontières, en Afrique de l’Ouest.

    Il présente les activités menées par le Bureau des Nations Unies pour l’Afrique de l’Ouest dans les domaines de la diplomatie préventive, de l’alerte rapide et de la création de capacités face aux menaces et aux difficultés émergentes qui compromettent la paix et la stabilité de la région.

    Son rapport présente également le travail accompli par le Bureau pour mettre en valeur les synergies, notamment avec la Communauté économique des États de l’Afrique de l’Ouest (CEDEAO), l’Union du fleuve Mano et l’Union africaine, pour servir la paix et la stabilité dans la sous-région.

    Le Secrétaire général observe que l’Afrique de l’Ouest continue d’être confrontée à de nombreux problèmes sur le plan de la paix et de la sécurité, principalement en raison de l’instabilité dans la région du Sahel, qui s’est tout récemment manifestée au Mali, ainsi qu’en raison des effets de la criminalité transnationale organisée et des problèmes transfrontières affectant les pays du bassin du fleuve Mano et du golfe de Guinée.

    Les dirigeants de la CEDEAO et de l’Union du fleuve Mano ont fait preuve d’une volonté fort louable de renforcer les capacités régionales de prévention des conflits et de mettre en place une structure de sécurité collective, écrit-il, en encourageant les partenaires internationaux à apporter à ces efforts l’aide diversifiée nécessaire.

    Les tentatives récentes faites par des groupes terroristes pour déstabiliser le Niger montrent assez le risque d’un débordement de la crise malienne sur les pays voisins du Mali. Ces tentatives rappellent aussi la nécessité de demeurer vigilants au sujet du Sahel et d’aider les pays de la région à éliminer les causes profondes de l’instabilité.

    La mise en œuvre de la stratégie intégrée des Nations Unies pour le Sahel suppose l’engagement soutenu des organismes des Nations Unies au cours de plusieurs années. Pour maximiser son impact sur la région, cette mise en œuvre devra s’appuyer sur un engagement solide du Bureau des Nations Unies pour l’Afrique de l’Ouest et du système des Nations Unies dans la région en vue de la création d’un mécanisme bien maîtrisé au niveau régional.

    Les capacités régionales d’alerte rapide, dans l’ensemble du Sahel, seront renforcées sous l’impulsion du Bureau des Nations Unies pour l’Afrique de l’Ouest avec l’aide de tous les organismes des Nations Unies qui appliqueront la stratégie.

    M. Ban se dit en outre préoccupé par l’impact de plus en plus lourd du terrorisme sur les pays de la sous-région, comme le montrent les prises d’otages et les attentats terroristes perpétrés durant la période considérée.

    Il se réjouit cependant de l’adoption par la CEDEAO d’une stratégie sous-régionale de lutte contre le terrorisme et appelle la communauté internationale à faciliter sa mise en œuvre. Il demande instamment aux pays de la sous-région de travailler, par des réponses soigneusement adaptées, à l’élimination des facteurs qui engendrent le terrorisme et à la prévention de diverses menaces, parmi lesquelles figurent les discours incendiaires qui incitent à la violence et au terrorisme.

    Le Secrétaire général se réjouit en outre des efforts du Gouvernement nigérian pour résoudre la crise déclenchée par le mouvement Boko Haram dans le nord-est du pays. Alors que les Nations Unies soutiennent pleinement le Nigéria dans les efforts qu’il fait pour lutter contre les actes de terrorisme, elles encouragent les autorités de ce pays à respecter les droits de l’homme et les normes internationales dans la conduite de leurs opérations militaires.

    Il salue également les efforts récemment accomplis par les principaux acteurs en Guinée, en particulier le Président guinéen, pour créer l’espace d’un dialogue politique avec l’opposition, avec l’aide de l’équipe de facilitateurs dirigée par son Représentant spécial pour l’Afrique de l’Ouest. Il appelle tous les acteurs guinéens à progresser rapidement et réellement dans leur dialogue afin de surmonter les obstacles techniques et politiques à l’organisation des élections législatives, trop longuement différées.

    La criminalité transnationale organisée et le trafic illicite de drogues sont des menaces qui pèsent de plus en plus sur la stabilité de l’Afrique de l’Ouest. Il se réjouit de la décision de la CEDEAO de prolonger de deux années supplémentaires son plan d’action régional pour la lutte contre la criminalité organisée et le trafic illicite de drogues. Il encourage cette organisation à mettre à jour et réviser ce plan d’action par un processus détaillé et inclusif pour résoudre les questions complexes telles que le blanchiment d’argent et la coopération judiciaire régionale.

    M. Ban trouve encourageants les efforts collectifs de la sous-région pour lutter contre la piraterie maritime, qui est une menace qui pèse de plus en plus sur la sécurité et les activités économiques. Il salue l’engagement de la Communauté économique des États d’Afrique centrale, de la CEDEAO et de la Commission du golfe de Guinée, qui ont décidé de développer une stratégie régionale de lutte contre la piraterie, avec l’aide des Nations Unies, comme le prévoit la résolution 2039 (2012).

    Il salue l’action de la Commission mixte Cameroun-Nigéria qui poursuit l’abornement de la frontière entre les deux pays et encourage les deux gouvernements à continuer à résoudre les derniers points de désaccord afin de mener à son terme le mandat de la Commission conformément à l’arrêt de la Cour internationale de Justice du 10 octobre 2002. La dernière réunion du Comité de suivi, qui marque la fin de la période de transition avant le transfert de souveraineté sur la péninsule de Bakassi au Cameroun, sera convoquée en septembre 2013 à New York, souligne le Secrétaire général.

    • *** * À l’intention des organes d’information • Document non officiel

    0 0

    Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
    Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Haiti, Iraq, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Niger, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tunisia, World, Yemen, Zimbabwe, South Sudan (Republic of)

    Serious food insecurity affects Syria, Central Africa, parts of West Africa

    11 July 2013, Rome - World total cereal production is forecast to increase by about 7 percent in 2013 compared to last year, helping to replenish global inventories and raise expectations for more stable markets in 2013/14, according to the latest issue of FAO's quarterly Crop Prospects and Food Situation report.

    The increase would bring world cereal production to 2 479 million tonnes, a new record level.

    FAO now puts world wheat output in 2013 at 704 million tonnes, an increase of 6.8 percent, which more than recoups the previous year's reduction and represents the highest level in history.

    World production of coarse grains in 2013 is now forecast by FAO at about 1 275 million tonnes, up sharply (9.7 percent) from 2012.

    World rice production in 2013 is forecast to expand by 1.9 percent to 500 million tonnes (milled equivalent) although prospects are still very provisional.

    Import forecasts, cereal prices

    Cereal imports of Low-Income Food-Deficit Countries for 2013/14 are estimated to rise by some 5 percent, compared to 2012/13, to meet growing demand. Egypt, Indonesia and Nigeria, in particular, are forecast to import larger volumes.

    International prices of wheat declined slightly in June with the onset of the 2013 harvests in the Northern Hemisphere. By contrast, maize prices increased, supported by continued tight supplies. Export prices of rice were generally stable.

    Food insecurity situations

    The report focuses on developments affecting the food security situation of developing countries. In its review of food insecurity hotspots, the report highlights the following countries, among others:

    In Syria, 2013 wheat production dropped significantly below average due to the escalating civil conflict leading to disruptions in farming activities. Livestock sector has been severely affected. About 4 million people are estimated to be facing severe food insecurity.

    In Egypt, civil unrest and dwindling foreign exchange reserves raise serious food security concerns.

    In Central Africa, serious food insecurity conditions prevail due to escalating conflict affecting about 8.4 million people in Central African Republic and Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    In West Africa, the overall food situation is favourable in most parts of the Sahel following an above-average 2012 cereal harvest. However, a large number of people are still affected by conflict and the lingering effects of the 2011/12 food crisis.

    In East Africa, although household food security has improved in most countries, serious concerns remain in conflict areas in Somalia, the Sudan, and South Sudan, with 1 million, 4.3 million and 1.2 million food insecure people, respectively.

    In Madagascar, damage caused by locusts and a cyclone is expected to reduce crop production in 2013, causing increased hunger, especially in the southern and western regions of the country.

    In the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, despite improved cereal harvest of the 2012 main season and the near normal outcome of the ongoing harvest of the 2013 early season, chronic food insecurity exists. An estimated 2.8 million vulnerable people require food assistance until the next harvest in October.

    In total, there are 34 countries requiring external food assistance, of which 27 countries are in Africa.


    0 0

    Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
    Country: Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Gambia, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Senegal, Somalia, Syrian Arab Republic, World, South Sudan (Republic of)

    Une grave insécurité alimentaire frappe Syrie, Afrique centrale et partie de l’Afrique de l’Ouest

    11 juillet 2013, Rome - La production céréalière totale mondiale devrait progresser d'environ 7 pour cent en 2013 par rapport à l'an dernier, contribuant ainsi à reconstituer les stocks mondiaux et à relever les perspectives de marchés plus stables en 2013/14, selon le dernier rapport trimestriel de la FAO Perspectives de récoltes et situation alimentaire.

    Avec cette augmentation, la production céréalière totale s'établirait à 2 479 millions de tonnes, un nouveau record.

    La FAO estime désormais la production mondiale de blé de 2013 à 704 millions de tonnes, soit une hausse de 6,8 pour cent qui compense largement la réduction de l'année précédente et représente le plus haut niveau jamais atteint.

    La production mondiale de céréales secondaires en 2013 est désormais estimée par la FAO à quelque 1 275 millions de tonnes, soit une forte progression de 9,7 pour cent par rapport à 2012.

    La production rizicole mondiale de 2013 devrait s'élever à 500 millions de tonnes (en équivalent usiné), soit un accroissement de 1,9 pour cent, même s'il s'agit d'estimations tout à fait provisoires.

    Prévisions d'importations, prix céréaliers

    Les importations céréalières des pays à faible revenu et à déficit vivrier pour 2013/14 devraient augmenter de quelque 5 pour cent par rapport à 2012/13 pour satisfaire la demande croissante. On prévoit notamment de plus gros volumes en Égypte, en Indonésie et au Nigéria.

    Les cours mondiaux du blé ont subi un léger fléchissement en juin avec le début des récoltes de 2013 dans l'hémisphère Nord. En revanche, les prix du maïs ont augmenté, soutenus par la tension persistante de l'offre. Les cours des exportations de riz sont restés généralement stables.

    Situation de l'insécurité alimentaire

    Le rapport, qui se concentre sur la situation des pays en développement, passe en revue les points chauds de l'insécurité alimentaire, et notamment les pays suivants:

    En Syrie, la production de blé de 2013 a considérablement reculé, tombant à un niveau inférieur à la moyenne en raison de l'intensification des troubles intérieurs qui a entraîné le bouleversement des activités agricoles. Le secteur de l'élevage a été très durement frappé et quelque 4 millions de personnes seraient victimes d'une grave insécurité alimentaire.

    En Egypte, les désordres sociaux et la baisse des réserves de devises engendrent de sérieuses inquiétudes pour la sécurité alimentaire.

    En Afrique centrale, il règne une grave insécurité alimentaire due à l'escalade des conflits qui touchent quelque 8,4 millions d'individus en République centrafricaine et en République démocratique du Congo.

    En Afrique de l'Ouest, la situation alimentaire est généralement favorable dans la plupart des régions du Sahel, compte tenu de la récolte céréalière de 2012 supérieure à la moyenne. Toutefois, de grands nombres de personnes sont encore touchées par les conflits et par les effets persistants de la crise alimentaire qui a sévi en 2011/12.

    En Afrique de l'Est, malgré une amélioration de la sécurité alimentaire des ménages dans la majorité des pays, de sérieuses inquiétudes planent sur les zones de conflit en Somalie, au Soudan et au Sud-Soudan, qui déplorent respectivement 1 million, 4,3 millions et 1,2 million de personnes victimes d'insécurité alimentaire.

    A Madagascar, les dégâts provoqués par les invasions de criquets et un cyclone devraient faire reculer la production agricole en 2013, avec pour conséquence une aggravation de la faim, en particulier dans le sud et l'ouest du pays.

    En République démocratique de Corée, en dépit d'une meilleure récolte céréalière de la campagne principale de 2012 et du résultat proche de la normale de la récolte en cours de la première campagne de 2013, l'insécurité alimentaire chronique continue à sévir. On estime à 2,8 millions les personnes vulnérables qui ont besoin d'une aide alimentaire jusqu'à la prochaine récolte d'octobre.

    Au total, 34 pays ont besoin d'une aide alimentaire extérieure, dont 27 pays d'Afrique.

    Contact Peter Lowrey Relations presse (Rome) (+39) 06 570 52762 (+39) 340 6992258peter.lowrey@fao.org


    0 0

    Source: IFRC
    Country: Kenya, Somalia
    preview


    This Revised Emergency Appeal now seeks CHF 21, 427, 140 in cash, kind or services to support the Kenya Red Cross Society (KRCS) assist about 60,000 direct beneficiaries (with health care reaching up to 140 000 beneficiaries including host communities) for an additional 2 months, and will be completed by the end of December 2013. A Final Report will be made available by 31 March 2014.

    Appeal target (current): CHF 21,427,140

    Appeal coverage: 72% (of the now revised budget)

    Appeal history:

    · A preliminary Emergency Appeal was launched on 19 October 2011 for CHF 27 618 017 (plus an estimated CHF 3 050 000 for emergency response units) to assist 60 000 beneficiaries for 12 months.

    · Disaster Relief Emergency Fund (DREF): CHF 500 000 was initially allocated from the Federation’s DREF to support the national society set up the operations in Dadaab.

    · An Emergency Appeal was launched on 29 November 2011 for CHF 26 154 197 to assist 76 000 beneficiaries for 12 months.

    · An operations update n° 1 was published on 25 January 2012 to provide an update on the operation progress since the launch.

    · An 8 months summary update was published on 30 August 2012.

    · An operations update n° 2 was published on 31 December 2012.

    · A 12 months summary update was published on 31 December 2012.

    · A revised Emergency Appeal was launched on 31 December 2012 seeking a reduced CHF 10 439 107 and extending the operation for a further 12 months to October 2013.

    · An operations update n° 3 was published on 27 May 2013.

    · This revision of the appeal highlights activities proposed to be implemented over the coming 2 months of the operation and permits an increase in the number of beneficiaries under the health outcome and adds a lesson learning component to the appeal. The revision also recognises that the previous Emergency appeals only catered for the 2012 proposed budget, while the revised budget now combines both 2012 and 2013 budgets.

    Summary: KRCS began an operational partnership with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), for support of key sector activities in IFO 2 West in October 2011. The camp was established in mid-2011, to accommodate refugees who arrived in Kenya in the second half of 2010 and first half of 2011, following intensified fighting in Somalia, and as a result of the drought that affected the Horn of Africa in 2011. The key sector activities included in the agreement are;

    · Camp Management

    · Health

    · Nutrition and Water, Sanitation and Hygiene.

    The initial duration of the operation was agreed for a period of one year. The revised appeal then extended this to mid-2013 and this revision now extends the agreement and the support until the end of 2013. This appeal highlights activities proposed to be implemented in this additional year as an extension of the agreement and as a revision to the appeal. It also outlines an increased budget and doubling of the health assistance. A lesson learning element has also been added (see outcome 5 below).

    The Key deliverables include:

    Outcome 1: The immediate and medium term water and sanitation needs of 60 000 refugees in IFO 2 West are met through the provision of safe water, adequate sanitation and promotion of hygiene practices.

    Outcome 2: The immediate and medium term health and nutrition needs are met and health risks for 120 000 refugees, 20 000 members of host communities as well as staff and volunteers are reduced.

    Outcome 3: Improved transitional shelter conditions for 150 staff (Interlocking Stabilised Soil Block, ISSB, technology).

    Outcome 4: Effective camp management, community based security and well-coordinated systems are in place to facilitate delivery of high quality assistance to up to 60 000 refugees for a period of a further 12 months.

    Outcome 5: Operational research will be conducted to document best practices in refugee operations

    Project monitoring will be done at two levels; sector specific monitoring will be done by the implementing teams, which are supported by UNHCR and community leaders. UNHCR conducts regular monitoring visits and provides appropriate feedback per sector. The camp leadership, which is often involved during implementation, also provides feedback during sector specific coordination meetings.

    The national level monitoring is conducted by the KRCS Monitoring and Evaluation unit, as well as by the IFRC Programme Monitoring Evaluation and Reporting Team. The two teams will conduct separate monitoring visits and develop field mission reports which are often shared with the project implementing teams.

    The KRCS has successfully implemented this project for the past 20 months (November 2011 to July 2013) and the revision now seeks to provide key sector services for the remainder of this year. KRCS has implemented similar programmes in the past, including camp management and lifesaving services in Health and Nutrition, Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) and child protection services during the 2008 Post Election Violence (PEV) in which 691,530 people were displaced in several parts of the country.

    The IFRC,on behalf of Kenya Red Cross Society, would like to extend thanks to all partners for their generous contributions.

    All operations-related appeals, reports, updates and information are available on the Appeals, plans and updates section of the web site: http://www.ifrc.org/en/publications-and-reports/appeals/


    0 0

    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Mali

    07/11/2013 11:01 GMT

    BAMAKO, July 11, 2013 (AFP) - The governor of the flashpoint Malian town of Kidal returned to his job on Thursday after more than a yearlong absence, ahead of crucial nationwide elections later this month.

    Adama Kamissoko's reinstatement comes at a time of violent protests in the northeastern rebel stronghold.

    Although Tuareg separatists have allowed the Malian army to enter the town as part of a peace deal ahead of the July 28 vote, the situation on the ground is increasingly tense.

    "I am happy to be back in my post," Kamissoko told AFP before boarding a flight at Bamako airport.

    "The priority now is obviously organising the presidential election. I hope everything goes well," he said, flanked by regional government officials.

    Local government has been absent from Kidal for more than a year since the National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad (MNLA) and allied armed factions linked to Al Qaeda seized Mali's vast desert in the north.

    Last week, some 200 Malian soldiers entered Kidal to try and improve security.

    However, in recent days, supporters and opponents of the Malian army have staged daily demonstrations.

    At least two UN peacekeepers and a French soldier were injured by stones thrown during a violent demonstration over the weekend.

    Two Malian civilians were seriously wounded by gunfire, although the circumstances behind the shootings remain unclear.

    The occupation of Kidal by the MNLA has been a major obstacle to organising the election, seen as crucial to reuniting deeply-divided Mali after an 18-month political crisis.

    Malian military officers staged a coup in March last year after being overpowered by an MNLA rebellion that seized key northern cities before being sidelined by its Islamist allies.

    A French-led intervention launched in January drove out the Islamists but the MNLA took control of Kidal, 1,500 kilometres (930 miles) from the capital, which they consider the heart of the desert territory they call Azawad.

    There is widespread scepticism about Mali's ability to stage elections, with the task of distributing more than seven million polling cards in a country where 500,000 people have been displaced viewed by many as an impossibility.

    sd-stb/ft/dh-jz

    © 1994-2013 Agence France-Presse


    0 0

    Source: Armed Conflict Location and Events Dataset
    Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Kenya, Mali, Somalia, Zimbabwe
    preview


    Welcome to the July issue of the Armed Conflict Location & Event Dataset (ACLED) Conflict Trends report. Each issue, ACLED data on conflict patterns and dynamics in Africa from the preceding month are presented and analysed in comparative and historical perspective. Realtime conflict event data is collected and published through our research partners at Climate Change and African Political Stability (CCAPS) where it is updated monthly.

    In addition, historical data from Volume III of the dataset, covering conflict in Africa from January 1997 to December 2012, is available online at acleddata.com, along with previous Conflict Trends reports, country profiles for key conflictaffected states, thematic special features, and information on the data collection and publication process.

    This month, we profile the escalation of unrest in Egypt, where June saw massive and diverse protests and riots, followed by the military intervening to oust the country’s first elected President a year after he had taken office.

    Ongoing violence in DR-Congo’s Katanga Province is also explored, alongside continuing communal violence in Kenya, escalating conflict in Somalia’s cities of Mogadishu and Kismayo, and what to expect in the upcoming elections in the two very different contexts of Mali and Zimbabwe.


    0 0

    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Mali

    07/11/2013 12:28 GMT

    Par Serge DANIEL

    BAMAKO, 11 juillet 2013 (AFP) - Le gouverneur de Kidal, berceau des Touareg dans le nord-est du Mali, a regagné la ville jeudi après un an et demi d'absence, marquant le retour formel de l'administration centrale pour y préparer le premier tour de la présidentielle du 28 juillet.

    "Je suis heureux de regagner mon poste, la priorité est évidemment l'organisation de la présidentielle", a déclaré à l'AFP le colonel Adama Kamissoko, accompagné de plusieurs autres responsables régionaux, avant son départ de l'aéroport de Bamako. "J'espère que tout se passera bien", a-t-il ajouté.

    Ce retour marque celui de l'administration centrale malienne, absente de Kidal (située à 1.500 km de Bamako) depuis le début de l'année 2012.

    L'armée malienne avait alors été mise en déroute par une offensive des rebelles touareg du Mouvement national de libération de l'Azawad (MNLA) alliés à des groupes islamistes armés de la mouvance Al-Qaïda qui avaient occupé tout le nord du Mali, abandonné par les représentants de l'Etat central de Bamako.

    Les groupes jihadistes ont depuis été en grande partie chassés de la zone par une intervention armée internationale initiée par la France, entamée en janvier et toujours en cours, qui permet le retour progressif des fonctionnaires.

    Mais les tensions restent vives à Kidal entre partisans et opposants du retour de l'armée il y a près d'une semaine. Celui-ci s'est fait parallèlement au cantonnement des combattants du MNLA, conformément à un accord de paix signé en juin à Ouagadougou.

    Plusieurs manifestations des deux camps ont eu lieu depuis. Deux soldats de la Minusma, la force de l'ONU au Mali, et un Français, également présents dans la ville, ont été blessés par des jets de pierres et des dizaines d'habitants, affirmant craindre des violences de la part des Touareg, se sont réfugiés dans un camp militaire.

    Deux civils, grièvement blessés par balles mercredi par des hommes armés, ont dû être évacués vers Gao, la grande ville du nord du Mali située à 300 km au sud de Kidal.

    Interrogations sur le vote à Kidal

    Déjà mauvaises avant le début du conflit, les relations entre communautés noires majoritaires au Mali et les "peaux rouges", membres des communautés arabe et touareg, se sont depuis considérablement dégradées, ces derniers étant assimilés aux groupes jihadistes, considérés comme les responsables des malheurs du pays.

    Le premier tour de la présidentielle, censée amorcer la réconciliation et rétablir l'ordre constitutionnel interrompu par un coup d'Etat en mars 2012, doit en principe se tenir à Kidal à la fin du mois comme dans le reste du Mali.

    Mais les tensions actuelles et l'impréparation du scrutin dans la ville font craindre que le scrutin ne puisse avoir lieu comme prévu. Selon un haut responsable malien, "si la situation continue à se dégrader à Kidal, on peut se demander si on peut envisager sur le terrain une campagne électorale, et même des élections".

    L'armée malienne a accusé le MNLA de violer l'accord de paix de Ouagadougou et le MNLA exige la libération de détenus conformément à cet accord et le départ de Kidal des "milices" anti-touareg qui, accuse-t-il, sont entrées dans la ville avec les soldats maliens.

    L'émissaire de l'ONU au Sahel, Romano Prodi, s'est dit inquiet mercredi pour le déroulement de la campagne présidentielle, soulignant en particulier le problème du vote des réfugiés et déplacés - environ 500.000 dont on ne sait pas s'ils pourront voter - et la nécessité de meilleures conditions de sécurité.

    Une délégation de la Commission dialogue et réconciliation (CDR), mise en place en mars mais qui n'a pour l'instant pas beaucoup avancé dans ses travaux, est arrivée jeudi matin à Gao, a constaté un journaliste de l'AFP.

    Elle est conduite par son président, Mamadou Salia Sokona, qui a estimé que "le travail de réconciliation est également un travail de terrain et il était normal que je fasse le déplacement avec mon équipe".

    Les membres de la CDR iront ensuite à Tombouctou (nord) et Mopti (centre), mais il n'est pas prévu qu'ils aillent à Kidal, signe supplémentaire que, dans cette ville, la réconciliation n'est pas encore à l'ordre du jour.

    sd-stb/jlb


    0 0

    Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
    Country: Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Gambia, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Senegal, Somalia, Syrian Arab Republic, World, South Sudan (Republic of)

    Siria, África central y una parte de África occidental sufren una grave inseguridad alimentaria

    11 de julio de 2013, Roma – Las previsiones indican que la producción mundial total de cereales aumentará un 7 por ciento en 2013 en comparación con el año pasado, ayudando a reponer los inventarios mundiales y haciendo aumentar las esperanzas de mercados más estables en 2013/14, según la última edición del informe trimestral de la FAO Perspectivas de cosechas y situación alimentaria.

    Este aumento podría elevar la producción mundial de cereales hasta 2 479 millones de toneladas, alcanzando así un nuevo récord.

    La FAO sitúa ahora la producción mundial de trigo en 2013 en 704 millones de toneladas, con un aumento del 6,8 por ciento, lo que supone recuperar con creces la disminución del año anterior y el nivel más alto de la historia.

    La producción mundial de cereales secundarios en 2013 se calcula por su parte en alrededor de 1 275 millones de toneladas, con un fuerte ascenso (9,7 por ciento) respecto a 2012.

    La previsión para la producción mundial de arroz en 2013 indica un aumento del 1,9 por ciento, para llegar a los 500 millones de toneladas (en equivalente de arroz elaborado), aunque se trata de una estimación todavía muy provisional.

    Previsión de importaciones y precios de cereales

    Se estima que las importaciones de cereales de los países de bajos ingresos con déficit de alimentos (PBIDA) en 2013/14 aumentarán en un 5 por ciento respecto a 2012/13, para satisfacer la creciente demanda. Egipto, Indonesia y Nigeria, importarán en particular grandes cantidades.

    Los precios internacionales del trigo se redujeron ligeramente en junio con el inicio de la temporada de recolección de 2013 en el hemisferio norte. Por el contrario, los precios del maíz aumentaron, apoyados por la continua escasez de suministros. Los precios de exportación de arroz fueron en general estables.

    Inseguridad alimentaria

    El informe de la FAO se centra en los acontecimientos que afectan a la situación de la seguridad alimentaria de los países en desarrollo. En su repaso a los puntos críticos de inseguridad alimentaria, destaca los siguientes países:

    En Siria, la producción de trigo de 2013 se redujo en forma significativa por debajo de la media debido a la escalada del conflicto civil y la interrupción de las actividades agrícolas. El sector ganadero se ha visto también muy afectado. Se calcula que cerca de 4 millones de personas se enfrentan a una situación de grave inseguridad alimentaria.

    En Egipto, los disturbios sociales y el descenso de las reservas de divisas han creado preocupación sobre la seguridad alimentaria.

    En África central prevalecen graves condiciones de inseguridad alimentaria debido a la escalada de conflicto que afecta a alrededor de 8,4 millones de personas en la República Centroafricana y la República Democrática del Congo.

    En África occidental, la situación alimentaria es en general favorable en la mayoría de las zonas del Sahel tras una cosecha de cereales en 2012 superior a la media. Sin embargo, un gran número de personas siguen aún afectadas por los conflictos y los efectos persistentes de la crisis alimentaria de 2011/12.

    En África oriental, a pesar de que la seguridad alimentaria de los hogares ha mejorado en la mayoría de los países, persisten una grave preocupación por los conflictos en Somalia, Sudán y Sudán del Sur, con 1 millón, 4,3 millones y 1,2 millones de personas padeciendo inseguridad alimentaria, respectivamente.

    En Madagascar, se espera que los daños causados ​​por la plaga de langostas y un ciclón lleven a un descenso de la producción agrícola en 2013, provocando un aumento del hambre, en especial en las regiones del sur y el oeste del país.

    En la República Popular Democrática de Corea, a pesar una mejor cosecha de cereales en la temporada principal de 2012 y una producción casi normal de la cosecha en curso de la temporada temprana de 2013, persiste la inseguridad alimentaria crónica. Se estima que unos 2,8 millones de personas vulnerables requerirán ayuda alimentaria hasta la próxima cosecha en octubre.

    En total, hay 34 países que necesitan ayuda alimentaria externa, de los cuales 27 se encuentran en África.

    Contacto

    Peter Lowrey
    Oficina de prensa (Roma)
    (+39) 06 570 52762
    (+39) 340 6992258
    peter.lowrey@fao.org


    0 0

    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger
    preview


    1. SUMMARY

    Despite the improved agricultural season of 2012-2013 which yielded greater cereal production (33.6% higher than the 2011/2012 yield), 1.8 million people in Burkina Faso remain food- insecure2 and are yet to recover from the 2012 food and nutrition crisis. Many families are putting any surplus from this year’s harvest towards paying back debts incurred the previous year. Furthermore, households face difficulties in food access due to low purchasing power, low household agricultural production and the isolation of many parts of the country.

    In response, the Comité Technique du Conseil National de Sécurité Alimentaire (CT-CNSA) has elaborated in May 2013 an operational plan on resilience and support to vulnerable populations that outlines the groups in need of assistance and focuses on minimizing the effects of food insecurity on vulnerable populations and livestock, while implementing resilience-building activities for households affected by last year’s food crisis, with a focus on early action.

    On the epidemiological situation, by the 22nd week of this year 2,586 suspected cases of measles were registered, including 35% notified by the Sahel Health Region. Out of the 35% Sahel cases, 40% come from the refugee camps. A measles vaccination campaign targeting the refugee populations aged six months and older was conducted from 5 to 11 February 2013 by health authorities in collaboration with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and other partners, which for various reasons covered only 35% of the target. The epidemiologic surveillance is still in progress across the country.

    After reviewing the situation and in the light of the national response plan, the Burkina Faso Humanitarian Country Team (HCT) maintains the four strategic objectives identified for humanitarian action this year. Looking forward, however, the humanitarian community is deeply concerned with the insufficiency of funding for humanitarian resilience-sensitive activities in 2013. If this trend is not reversed, it will be hard to consolidate the gains made this year with the good harvests and there may be no noticeable improvement in the humanitarian caseload in 2014.


    0 0

    Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
    Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Haiti, Iraq, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Niger, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tunisia, World, Yemen, Zimbabwe, South Sudan (Republic of)

    World cereal production set to reach historic high in 2013

    Serious food insecurity affects Syria, Central Africa, parts of West Africa

    11 July 2013, Rome - World total cereal production is forecast to increase by about 7 percent in 2013 compared to last year, helping to replenish global inventories and raise expectations for more stable markets in 2013/14, according to the latest issue of FAO's quarterly Crop Prospects and Food Situation report.

    The increase would bring world cereal production to 2 479 million tonnes, a new record level.

    FAO now puts world wheat output in 2013 at 704 million tonnes, an increase of 6.8 percent, which more than recoups the previous year's reduction and represents the highest level in history.

    World production of coarse grains in 2013 is now forecast by FAO at about 1 275 million tonnes, up sharply (9.7 percent) from 2012.

    World rice production in 2013 is forecast to expand by 1.9 percent to 500 million tonnes (milled equivalent) although prospects are still very provisional.

    Import forecasts, cereal prices

    Cereal imports of Low-Income Food-Deficit Countries for 2013/14 are estimated to rise by some 5 percent, compared to 2012/13, to meet growing demand. Egypt, Indonesia and Nigeria, in particular, are forecast to import larger volumes.

    International prices of wheat declined slightly in June with the onset of the 2013 harvests in the Northern Hemisphere. By contrast, maize prices increased, supported by continued tight supplies. Export prices of rice were generally stable.

    Food insecurity situations

    The report focuses on developments affecting the food security situation of developing countries. In its review of food insecurity hotspots, the report highlights the following countries, among others:

    In Syria, 2013 wheat production dropped significantly below average due to the escalating civil conflict leading to disruptions in farming activities. Livestock sector has been severely affected. About 4 million people are estimated to be facing severe food insecurity.

    In Egypt, civil unrest and dwindling foreign exchange reserves raise serious food security concerns.

    In Central Africa, serious food insecurity conditions prevail due to escalating conflict affecting about 8.4 million people in Central African Republic and Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    In West Africa, the overall food situation is favourable in most parts of the Sahel following an above-average 2012 cereal harvest. However, a large number of people are still affected by conflict and the lingering effects of the 2011/12 food crisis.

    In East Africa, although household food security has improved in most countries, serious concerns remain in conflict areas in Somalia, the Sudan, and South Sudan, with 1 million, 4.3 million and 1.2 million food insecure people, respectively.

    In Madagascar, damage caused by locusts and a cyclone is expected to reduce crop production in 2013, causing increased hunger, especially in the southern and western regions of the country.

    In the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, despite improved cereal harvest of the 2012 main season and the near normal outcome of the ongoing harvest of the 2013 early season, chronic food insecurity exists. An estimated 2.8 million vulnerable people require food assistance until the next harvest in October.

    In total, there are 34 countries requiring external food assistance, of which 27 countries are in Africa.


    0 0

    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Mali

    07/11/2013 20:54 GMT

    BAMAKO, July 11, 2013 (AFP) - The governor of the flashpoint Malian town of Kidal returned to his city on Thursday after more than a yearlong absence but left after a brief visit, as the country prepares for crucial nationwide elections later this month, security sources said..

    "The governor of Kidal, who arrived today, left late afternoon by the plane that brought him" from Bamako, a Malian military source said without explaining the "strategic reasons" for his departure.

    The departure back to Bamako of the governor, Adama Kamissoko, was confirmed by a source in the UN's African force in Mali, who said that when he arrived in Kidal there was "really some tension."

    Questioned shortly after his arrival, Kamissoko said that the buildings of the governor's administration were "occupied by armed groups" which he did not name. He did not rule out returning to Bamako "before coming back", he said.

    His visit comes at a time of violent protests in the northeastern rebel stronghold.

    Although Tuareg separatists have allowed the Malian army to enter Kidal as part of a peace deal ahead of the July 28 vote, the situation on the ground is increasingly tense.

    Earlier Kamissoko told AFP before boarding a flight at Bamako airport: "I am happy to be back in my post."

    "The priority now is obviously organising the presidential election. I hope everything goes well," he said, flanked by regional government officials.

    Local government has been absent from Kidal for more than a year since the National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad (MNLA) and allied armed factions linked to Al Qaeda seized Mali's vast desert in the north.

    Last week, some 200 Malian soldiers entered Kidal to try and improve security.

    However, in recent days, supporters and opponents of the Malian army have staged daily demonstrations.

    At least two UN peacekeepers and a French soldier were injured by stones thrown during a violent demonstration over the weekend.

    Two Malian civilians were seriously wounded by gunfire, although the circumstances behind the shootings remain unclear.

    The occupation of Kidal by the MNLA has been a major obstacle to organising the election, seen as crucial to reuniting deeply-divided Mali after an 18-month political crisis.

    Malian military officers staged a coup in March last year after being overpowered by an MNLA rebellion that seized key northern cities before being sidelined by its Islamist allies.

    A French-led intervention launched in January drove out the Islamists but the MNLA took control of Kidal, 1,500 kilometres (930 miles) from the capital, which they consider the heart of the desert territory they call Azawad.

    There is widespread scepticism about Mali's ability to stage elections, with the task of distributing more than seven million polling cards in a country where 500,000 people have been displaced viewed by many as an impossibility.

    sd-stb/ft/boc

    © 1994-2013 Agence France-Presse


    0 0

    Source: Agence France-Presse
    Country: Mali

    07/11/2013 20:12 GMT

    BAMAKO, 11 juillet 2013 (AFP) - Le gouverneur de Kidal, ville du nord du Mali soumise à de vives tensions entre l'armée malienne et la rébellion touareg, en est reparti jeudi soir après quelques heures sur place alors qu'il devait y rester pour préparer l'élection présidentielle du 28 juillet, a appris l'AFP de sources militaires malienne et africaine.

    "Le gouverneur de Kidal, qui est arrivé aujourd'hui, est reparti en fin d'après-midi par l'avion qui l'a amené" de Bamako, a affirmé la source malienne, en parlant, sans les donner, de "raisons stratégiques"à ce départ. Un retour à Bamako était "une des hypothèses arrêtées avant son arrivée", a-t-elle ajouté.

    Le retour à Bamako du gouverneur, le colonel Adama Kamissoko, a été confirmé par une source africaine de la force de l'ONU au Mali (Minusma), qui a dit qu'à son arrivée il y avait "vraiment de la tension".

    Interrogé peu après son arrivée à Kidal, le gouverneur, accompagné de plusieurs autres responsables régionaux, avait déclaré que "les locaux du gouvernorat"étaient "occupés par des groupes armés" qu'il n'avait pas nommés. Il n'avait pas exclu un retour à Bamako "avant de revenir".

    Ce retour du gouverneur pour préparer le premier tour de la présidentielle du 28 juillet, devait marquer celui de l'administration centrale malienne, absente de Kidal (située à 1.500 km de Bamako) depuis le début de l'année 2012.

    L'armée malienne avait alors été mise en déroute par une offensive des rebelles touareg du Mouvement national de libération de l'Azawad (MNLA) alliés à des groupes islamistes armés de la mouvance Al-Qaïda qui avaient occupé tout le nord du Mali, abandonné par les représentants de l'Etat central de Bamako.

    Mais les tensions restent vives à Kidal entre partisans et opposants du retour de l'armée il y a près d'une semaine. Celui-ci s'est fait parallèlement au cantonnement des combattants du MNLA, conformément à un accord de paix signé en juin à Ouagadougou.

    Plusieurs manifestations des deux camps ont eu lieu depuis. Deux soldats de la Minusma, et un Français, également présents dans la ville, ont été blessés par des jets de pierres et des dizaines d'habitants, affirmant craindre des violences de la part des Touareg, se sont réfugiés dans un camp militaire.

    sd-stb/plh

    © 1994-2013 Agence France-Presse


    0 0

    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Togo
    preview


    During the second quarter, CERF allocates over US$ 19.8 million for Life saving programs

    The United Nations Cenral Emergency Response Fund (CERF) has allocated over the last three months a total of US$19.8 million to Central African Republic (CAR), Chad, Congo, Mali and Senegal. This brings to $47.9 million the total amount allocated so far in 2013 to West and Central Africa.

    During the second quarter, more than $7 million has been disbursed for conflict-affected populations in CAR, while Chad has received $4.8 million for CAR and Sudanese refugees, returnees and host communities. Mali received a total of US$4 million for health, nutrition and protection programs. Over $750,000 was injected in Congo to address the cholera oubreak. A total of $5.3 million has been directed in the Sahel food and security emergency : Senegal ($3 million), Mali ($1.7 million) and Chad (600,000) for mainly nutrition, food and agriculture programs.


    0 0

    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Togo
    preview


    Le CERF alloue plus de 19,8 millions de dollars pour des programmes d’urgence au second trimestre

    Le Fonds Central d’Intervention d’Urgence des Nations Unies (CERF) a alloué au cours des trois derniers mois un total de 19,8 millions de dollars au Congo, au Mali, à la République Centrafricaine (RCA), au Sénégal et au Tchad. Cette dotation porte à 47,9 millions de dollars le montant total alloué en 2013 à l’Afrique de l’Ouest et du Centre.

    Au cours du deuxième trimestre, plus de 7 millions de dollars ont été déboursés pour les populations touchées par le conflit en RCA, tandis que le Tchad a reçu 4,8 millions de dollars pour les réfugiés soudanais et centrafricains, les retour- nés tchadiens et les communautés hôtes. Le Mali a reçu un total de 4 millions de dollars pour les programmes de santé, de nutrition et de protection. Plus de 750.000 dollars ont été injectés au Congo pour faire face à l’épidémie de choléra. Un total de 5,3 millions de dollars a été injecté dans l'urgence alimentaire au Sahel : Sénégal (3 millions de dollars), Mali (1,7 millions de dollars) et Tchad (600.000 dollars) pour principalement des programmes de nutrition, d’assistance ali- mentaire et d'agriculture.


    0 0

    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Chad, Senegal, Sudan

    Au menu:

    · La FAO forme les humanitaires sur la « redevabilité » (Le Progrès n° 3670, 11/07/13)

    · Chad: Sudanese Refugees in Chad Face Bleak Ramadan (All Africa, 09/07/13)

    · Greater funding needed for Chad and other countries of the Sahel (SOS Children’s Villages, 09/07/13)

    · VIH-SIDA: Une formation à la prise en charge mère-enfant (Le Progrès 3670 11/07/13)

    · Europ Assistance-Global Corporate Solutions (GCS) hosts Malaria Awareness & Prevention event in Chad (Europ Assistant, 08/07/13)

    · Tchad: une marche pour célébrer le procès Habré (RFI, 06/07/13)


    0 0

    Source: Department for International Development
    Country: Malawi, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Zimbabwe

    International Development Minister Lynne Featherstone announces support to help millions facing food crisis in Malawi and Zimbabwe.

    Britain will provide up to £35 million to help millions of the world’s poorest people survive a looming food crisis that is set to grip Southern Africa, International Development Minister Lynne Featherstone announced in Malawi today.

    Rising food prices have combined with unpredictable weather to leave food stocks dangerously low across the region.

    Malawi, which was a net exporter of maize just a few years ago, has now seen stocks depleted to a quarter of its annual average after the worst harvest in 7 years. Meanwhile maize prices have more than doubled over the past year.

    In Zimbabwe, early indications show that the harvest will be significantly worse than last year, when 1 in 5 people in rural areas – 1.6 million people – did not have enough to eat before British support was dispersed.

    International Development Minister Lynne Featherstone said:

    “Countries across Southern Africa are facing disaster as a looming food crisis threatens to leave millions hungry.

    “British support will save countless lives in 2 of the worst-affected countries in the region, ensuring the most vulnerable people in Malawi and Zimbabwe are not forgotten as the crisis worsens.”

    Britain will provide up to £20 million in food assistance to Malawi over the next 12 months. The humanitarian package will support the World Food Programme (WFP) and international NGOs, and will provide:

    • Nearly half a million vulnerable people with food and cash transfers;
    • school meals to over 800,000 school children; and
    • treatment for 18,000 malnourished children and pregnant women.

    Malawi’s President, Joyce Banda said:

    “My government has always cherished the UK government’s responsiveness to our request for support and grateful for this assistance. This support will go a long way in protecting the livelihoods of vulnerable Malawians who are likely going to miss their food entitlements due to food insecurity at household level. This support complements my government’s efforts to combat hunger and malnutrition in Malawi.”

    Britain will also provide £15 million to the WFP and the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) in Zimbabwe. This package will provide:

    • food to over 600,000 people; and
    • enough cattle feed and vaccinations to protect the livestock and livelihoods of over 300,000 people.

    0 0

    Source: Refugees International
    Country: Burkina Faso

    In the shade of a tree, a group of girls crush rocks, pounding away relentlessly with heavy stone clubs. It is the middle of the day here in Boulyiba, Burkina Faso. The dry season is almost at an end, and the temperature hovers above 100°F, yet these girls have a great deal of hard work ahead of them. Their father, Assane, has brought a whole pile of rocks back from a gold mine 15 kilometers from their village.

    Assane and his daughters walk us through the backbreaking process. After crushing the rocks, they sift them and mix the fine powder in a pan with water. The heavier gold particles then drop to the bottom. Assane brings us one of the pans and points out a few sparkling specks, barely visible to the naked eye. He then disappears into his hut and returns with a gold lump the size of a walnut: the treasure he has accumulated over the course of seven months. He will sell this in the capital, Ouagadougou, for about $1,000.

    Here in Burkina Faso, it is estimated that more than 600,000 children are working in about 600 informal mines spread across the country. But even these disturbing figures do not account for these girls (and many other children like them) who are working in their own villages away from the mining sites.

    Burkina Faso is experiencing something of a gold rush, with many new mines opening in the last 30 years. But it is not the promise of dizzying wealth that has led farmers and herders to pick up spades and start digging; rather, it is the erosion of their traditional livelihoods.

    Climate change has brought extreme weather events to this region, which have slashed the incomes of people here. Low rainfall alternating with flooding has destroyed crops and reduced harvests to the point where they can no longer sustain a family for more than a few months. This has forced villagers to find other sources of income. Some sell their cattle or try their hand at petty trading. Some migrate to urban centers or neighboring countries like Côte d’Ivoire. But more than anything else, people are reluctantly going into the mines.

    As we spoke with other villagers in Boulyiba, some men said that they did not allow anyone under 20 to go to the larger mines nearby –not because of the poor labor conditions and serious safety issues there, but because they will never leave the mines once they get a taste of “quick” and “easy” money.

    Life in Boulyiba is hard, the men say, and if all the young people head to the mines then there will be no one left to fix all the problems at home. They say the youth lack the maturity to understand that gold mining is not a permanent solution to their income problems; it will not rehabilitate their degraded lands or restore the livelihoods they once enjoyed. And yet the village girls continued to pound away at their rocks, few of which will yield any precious metal.

    The Burkinabé government must provide incentives for these vulnerable communities to remain in their homes, rehabilitate their farms and livestock, and avoid distress migration to the mines. Without a focus on resiliency and capacity building, the people of this region will increasingly be forced to move in order to survive.

    In the short term, however, it is imperative that the government provide rigorous oversight of artisanal mining sites, enforce laws against child labor, and improve safety conditions. It must strike a balance between depriving these communities of sorely needed income on the one hand, and risking their lives and their children’s futures on the other.


    0 0

    Source: Save the Children
    Country: Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mali, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Syrian Arab Republic, World
    preview


    Children's Futures at Risk

    On July 12, 2013, youth delegates from around the globe will meet at the United Nations in New York City to fight for a quality education for all children, even those living in areas of war and conflict. They will be joined by children like Malala, a Pakistani school girl and education activist whose only ‘crime’ was a desire to learn when she was shot and gravely wounded by armed men on her way back from school.

    Sadly, attacks on education are not uncommon. The United Nations defines an attack as any intentional threat or use of force directed against students, teachers, education personnel and/or education institutions, carried out for political, religious or criminal reasons.[i] Nearly 50 million children and young people in conflict zones face these unnerving barriers to education every day, keeping them out of school and preventing them from reaching their true potential.

    The number of recorded attacks on education has increased in recent years. Global reports show these confrontations and acts of violence are widespread in a number of on-going conflicts. Based on UN data, Save the Children estimates that there were more than 3,600 separate, documented attacks on education in 2012.[ii]

    Protect, Prohibit, Preserve

    Save the Children is calling on world leaders to tackle this crisis and commit to the following:

    Protect education by criminalizing attacks on education, prohibiting the use of schools by armed groups, and working with schools and communities to adopt local measures to preserve schools as centers for learning.

    Cover the funding gap by increasing the current levels of humanitarian funding to education and progressively work towards reaching a minimum of 4 percent of global humanitarian funding.

    [i] See Global Coalition to Protect Education from Attack (GCPEA), What Is an Attack on Education?; UNESCO, Education Under Attack 2010, Paris, 2010, see pg 23-28

    [ii] UNESCO, Institute of Statistics and Education for All Global Monitoring Report (EFA-GMR), Schooling for millions of children jeopardised by reductions in aid, UIS Factsheet No. 25, June 2013


older | 1 | .... | 152 | 153 | (Page 154) | 155 | 156 | .... | 728 | newer